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Helpful votes received on reviews: 100% (97 of 97)
 

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Top Reviewer Ranking: 4,554,572 - Total Helpful Votes: 97 of 97
A Shopkeeper Will Not Appear ~ Heist
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Daydream notions, 8 Jun 2004
Heist is a musical collective founded by Mike Targett and Allison Thomson, two firm believers in the grand tradition of finely crafted British pop that is both lyrically audacious and melodically adventurous.
Heist creates lustrous, symphonic music, a melange of trumpet, strings, synths, bouzouki and zither, with the occasional burst of stinging electric guitar. In less talented hands, such eclecticism might verge on the wilfully exotic, but Targett's brilliant arrangements ensure that the instrumentation always serves the mood of the songs. Their first album, "Friday Night At The Trabi Races" was released in 2000 to critical acclaim, and several European tours won them new converts… Read more
The Sound of the City: New Orleans ~ Various Artists
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Swingin'!, 6 Nov 2003
On his Sound Of The City series of compilation CDs, esteemed writer and broadcaster Charlie Gillett draws together the diverse music of the cities that shaped the course of American music. It's such a simple idea (all the best ones are) and he has executed it brilliantly.
Sound Of The City: New Orleans is a 2CD riot of music from start to finish. To listen to these joyous, jumpin' recordings in this era of branded and airbrushed pop pap feels so great, like a musical restorative. Feeling jaded by the soporific, lumpen grumblings of the likes of Limp Bizkit, Staind and the rest of the therapy rock generation? Then put on.. let's see.. Ronnie And The Delinquents' Bad Neighbourhood. Two… Read more
The North Star Grassman and the Ravens ~ Sandy Denny
38 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bewitching, 4 Nov 2003
This neglected classic was Sandy's first solo album following the demise of the short-lived but superb Fotheringay. The cast of musicians she gathered round her to help make TNSGATR included the members of that group and Richard Thompson, whose contributions to the album are uniformly excellent.
Her decision to work with people who were both great musicians and good friends was a wise one. From the entirely sympathetic backing to the understated production and engineering by old Fairport Convention collaborator John Wood, the sound of the album is one of its strongest points. It is less polished than some of her later solo records, and I think it is all the better for that. It also has… Read more