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Wade Miller Knight "pachiaammos" (London)
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Fair Trade Tibetan Singing Meditation Bowl Gift Box Set
Fair Trade Tibetan Singing Meditation Bowl Gift Box Set
Offered by Llama Fair Trade
Price: £20.95

4.0 out of 5 stars Good for group meditation, 16 Mar 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Simple and effective. I got it to signal an end of a silent technique when leading group meditations, and it's good for this purpose. It makes a pleasing ringing sound with the striker and it's portable.


Yoga of the Bhagavad Gita: An Introduction to India's Universal Science of God-realization
Yoga of the Bhagavad Gita: An Introduction to India's Universal Science of God-realization
by Paramahansa Yogananda
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Lovely and sustaining, 18 Nov 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A valuable, fluent, spiritually nurturing, complete Gita translation into English. This version is accompanied by just a few highlights from Yogananda's much longer commentary in his "God Talks With Arjuna", positioned so they do not obstruct the reading of the Gita verses. Yogananda is a jagadguru (world spiritual teacher) and occasionally interprets words and gives meanings that will be controversial with Sanskrit scholars because he wrote from his deepest intuition; in particular, he interprets passages to show the Gita as advocating yogi meditation in general, and Kriya Yoga (his diksha) in particular. For close study, I use Yogananda's smooth and wise Gita in conjunction with Swami Tapasyananda's "Srimad Bhagavadgita" (from the Ramakrishna Vedanta Centre) which has the Sanskrit in Devanagari script, Sanskrit in Roman letters, word-by-word literal translation, and translation in English sentences.


Maxell 124036.01 - 124036.01 UR-90 5PK Ferric Audio
Maxell 124036.01 - 124036.01 UR-90 5PK Ferric Audio
Offered by Sivitec_Direct
Price: £3.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Smooth, 18 Nov 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Excellent for recording speech or classical music onto - in the room or from the radio - and for copying other cassettes onto.


Pack of 6 Mini Mutki Diwali Diyas filled with Wax 4 x 2.5 cm
Pack of 6 Mini Mutki Diwali Diyas filled with Wax 4 x 2.5 cm
Offered by Gifts and More Gifts
Price: £6.75

3.0 out of 5 stars Good to use once with care., 18 Nov 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The earlier reviewer's advice about their getting hot was invaluable. I took a heatproof board with me to use the diyas on. Pluses: the design is lovely, the material and size are authentic, and they were easy to light and to carry. They avoid the challenge of getting and working with an oil wick. Minuses: they can only be used once, last only 1 1/2 hours, and were still hot to pack away 1/4 hour after blowing out.


Ian Snow Brocade Box Cushion, Purple
Ian Snow Brocade Box Cushion, Purple

5.0 out of 5 stars sustainable sitting, 3 Sep 2013
This is the best cushion I ever bought. Expensive, compared with a 'normal' £12-20 cushion, but far better sitting. It supports me for an hour to make a firm chair feel comfortable. Feels soft yet has stayed firm through 2 1/2 years of daily use.


TDK D90 blank AUDIO tapes - Pack 10
TDK D90 blank AUDIO tapes - Pack 10
Offered by Asantee Soaps Direct UK
Price: £25.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It is what it says on the tin, 28 April 2011
Fine quality audiotapes. TDK as we have come to know them. Excellent for recording onto, copying from another cassette, and taping from the radio.


Britannia Prima: The Romans in the West of Britain
Britannia Prima: The Romans in the West of Britain
by Brian White
Edition: Paperback

6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good on 4th century, bad on 5th, 12 July 2010
This is a beautiful book in feel, and I figure a major contribution to understanding of Britain in the fourth century CE. Both town and villa-based countryside life for the Roman elite are described in depth. The style of writing sustains interest and evokes careful, unhurried reading. The several dozen drawings are precise and informative, and the colour photographs are skilfully selected and evocative. However, for someone primarily interested in the fifth and sixth centuries, the book is in the end utterly unsatisfying. Two words it never uses are kaer and Druid: absences that reveal White's basic non-understanding of Brittonic society at the inception of the mediaeval era.

In his enthusiasm for the unity of Britannia Prima, he does not see that when the colonial power collapsed in 409 the primary cohesive political units immediately became the civitates, that - as often also in recent times after decolonisation in Africa - the tribe (so, here, the civitas) was the natural focus of allegiance; White gives no evidence for the fourth-century province of Prima surviving as a political entity after 409. Rather, it seems that civitates became kingdoms ruled by a king who lived in a kaer (citadel), or in larger kingdoms progressed among several kaers, moving with his teulu (warrior knights pledged to loyalty), with his Druids and bards who were the kingdom's religious and cultural leaders and the keepers of its stories, and with a workforce of servants and craftsmen. White gives archaeological evidence for this, particularly at South Cadbury, Caernarfon and Poundbury, but bypasses it in his eagerness to leap from Roman to Christian power without considering the native religious culture.

Another basic misconception (p205) is that the early-mediaeval church needed towns as their ecclesiastical power-base, when the evidence is that Christian leaders such as Kentigern and Deiniol directly displaced Druids at the kaers of kings such as Rhydderch of Strathclyde and Maelgwn of Gwynedd, and had no status in the societal heirarchy independent of the power of the king. The first acts of seventh-century Roman bishops, such as Augustine at Canterbury and Paulinus at York, were to build or renovate fixed churches, but there is no evidence for similar acts by the earliest mediaeval Brittonic bishops such as David, Dunaut and Dyfrig.

White also passes on unexamined the pro-English propaganda line that the Saxons were innocent of the destruction of Roman Britain. Who does he think was responsible for making the burden of Roman governance untenable in the decades leading up to 409? Who required an entire Legion to be moved in the mid-fourth century from Caerleon to Richborough, Kent? Whom did the Gallic Chronicle of 441 say `the Provinces of Britain', meaning Flavia and parts of Maxima, had by then fallen into the hands of? Whom does Gildas, writing in c548, call `our enemies in the east'? The answer to all four questions is Saxon, i.e. English, warrior raiders and settlers.

White's strength is the interpretation of archaeological evidence. He makes a strong and thorough case for his understanding of the boundaries of Britannia Prima; for Cirencester having been its capital; and for the continuity with a greatly reduced population of many of its civitas capitals in the fifth century as market towns, as also of some ports such as Meols (Chester) and Abona (Bristol). Chapter 8, on Roman towns in the fifth century, is excellent. He also shows a valuable understanding of the fourth-century economy and of the economy of the fifth century with its different trade routes, military needs, elite expressions of wealth, and overwhelming preference for use of wood rather than stone or masonry for building. His attention to detail (a possible church here, a six times reconstructed floor there) means the reader at times needs to make a conscious effort to see the wood for the trees; and I longed for one map of Prima just locating all the modern places the text refers to.

His corresponding weakness is that he gives minimal weight to the thin but important corpus of contemporary and near-contemporary documentary evidence and none at all to the native oral tradition. Several times he falls into the trap of assuming that because the orthography of a text (a poem, for example) shows that it was first written down in, say, the ninth century the content was necessarily composed in the ninth century. In common with many others, he does not realise that Cornwall and Dumnonia are the name in different languages for the same place, the prosperous kingdom in the fifth and sixth centuries known in Welsh as Kernyw.

Finally, I question the purpose of the overwhelm of over six hundred references to other books.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 9, 2011 1:51 PM GMT


Annales Cambriae: A Translation of Harleian 3859; PRO E.164/1; Cottonian Domitian, A 1; Exeter Cathedral Library MS. 3514 and MS Exchequer DB Neath, PRO E
Annales Cambriae: A Translation of Harleian 3859; PRO E.164/1; Cottonian Domitian, A 1; Exeter Cathedral Library MS. 3514 and MS Exchequer DB Neath, PRO E
by Paul Martin Remfry
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful notes, 10 May 2010
Remfry's love of the field shows. His many detailed and sometimes long notes on the entries are a major asset for anyone seriously examining the Annales Cambriae. His discussion of how the Annales came to be in their present form is helpful and well worth reading. This is importantly the first clear source of the C manuscript I have found - it is not available online. It is a great swizz that the D (Exeter) manuscript is not also included.

Be aware that only Remfry's (good) English translation, not the original texts, is given and that the dating used, the conventional one that adds 444 to the figures in the A manuscripto convert them to the CE calendar, is debatable.

One can argue with some of Remfry's assertions (about the entry for 682 for example), but that is the nature of history. The Camlann entry is omitted from the translation of the A version by mistake.


Notes on a Scandal
Notes on a Scandal
by ZoŽ Heller
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.19

4 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good read, but ethically shallow, 22 Feb 2007
This review is from: Notes on a Scandal (Paperback)
The strength of this book is the characterisation of the two main people, Barbara and Sheba, and the evolving growth and moodswings of relationship between them. The author's style holds my attention: I kept wanting to know what was coming next. But for me the book is shallow, more an extended short-story than a true novel. In particular, I sorrow that the implicit ethical dilemmas are not addressed. It is one thing for both major characters to be like a person of whom my best friend said, when I asked if he had confronted the truth, "he would never confront anything, let alone the truth". It is quite another for the author to look at "a scandal" without doing so. What Sheba does is described in arguably needless detail; why is only vaguely implied rather than deeply explored; the meaning and implications of both Sheba's and Barbara's choices are barely contemplated.

Also, I was left discontented by the lack of clue as to how Richard (Sheba's husband) transforms from the benevolent and contented, if complacent, mature man he is before the dam breaks to the ogre he manifests as afterwards.

As a Londoner I gained extra pleasure from accompanying the story on my street map, and on my mental social map, of London. But as a Londoner I also know someone a stone's throw from Connolly's house who could help Sheba sell her sculptures during the 'scandal', and it seems strange that no-one in the book thinks to suggest doing so to Sheba. This to me is another example of the book being not texturally dense enough.


The Highly Sensitive Person: How to Thrive When the World Overwhelms You
The Highly Sensitive Person: How to Thrive When the World Overwhelms You
by Elaine N. Aron
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.69

125 of 128 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Un-puttable-downable, 8 July 2006
One of the three truly sustaining, and 'un-puttable-downable' books I have read this century.

Aron says a lot of "highly sensitive" people don't appreciate this quality in themselves. The core idea is that some of us are in tune with the subtle, the spiritual, the gentle, loving and kind, and enjoy quiet .... and the flip side is that we are easily overwhelmed (and maybe flare up) by excess stimulus. Whereas most of humanity, in the West anyhow (and especially Americans), appreciate lots of stimulus -- as can be seen from the restless noise everywhere in our cities and the cultural enthusiam for what is "new", "exciting" and an "adventure".

If you are "highly sensitive" (you can find and use Aron's test online to find out) and don't know it, or if you know it but don't love it in you, you may find warmth, comfort and encouragement to be yourself through this book. If someone you love is "highly sensitive", perhaps you will come to understand them better.

Valuable for counsellors too for the same reason: helpful for understanding people.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 16, 2011 3:20 PM BST


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