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Mr. Mark Bannerman (Aberdeen, Scotland)
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Neewer 2.4G Hz USB Wireless Blue Optical Streamline Cordless Mouse For Apple Macbook Mac PC
Neewer 2.4G Hz USB Wireless Blue Optical Streamline Cordless Mouse For Apple Macbook Mac PC
Offered by iTekLife Global
Price: £6.98

5.0 out of 5 stars Neat & trim, worked right away, no problems with it at all., 22 May 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A neat, slim mouse that can fit into an ultrabook case without a separate compartment. Worked without fuss. Completely happy with it.


Sony MDR-E 818 LP  Headphones
Sony MDR-E 818 LP Headphones

4.0 out of 5 stars Great Value for Money, 24 Mar. 2010
Not everyone can tell a £60 pair of earphones from a £15 pair. If you are looking for some pretty good ones but don't think you need the very best then I would recommend these. The sound is reasonably rich, very little distortion on sibilants and considerably louder than the ones that came with the pda I use most frequently. I find this type more comfortable than the ones that insert right into the ear canal, so these are just right for me, however they don't block as much extraneous sound. If they had a volume control on the lead I would have given them a five star rating. They are not for the man with a wall of audio equipment but for everyday use they are just right.


Imperial Blandings: "Full Moon"; "Pigs Have Wings"; "Service with a Smile": An Omnibus
Imperial Blandings: "Full Moon"; "Pigs Have Wings"; "Service with a Smile": An Omnibus
by P. G. Wodehouse
Edition: Paperback

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars To be at Blandings..., 4 July 2008
Of all authors, P.G. Wodehouse is perhaps the most guilty of re-cycling his plot devices. Visiting a country house under an alias, writing a scandalous memoir, weaselling out of an engagement or, of course, stealing or nobbling a pig, all occur so frequently in Wodehouse plotlines that stories can seem to merge together. As faults go it isn't the worst. Even Jane Austen wasn't afraid to lift the odd bit of a situation from book to book, though she never managed to work pig-nobbling into any. For an author of the calibre of, say, Jeffrey Archer it would be a crippling flaw but for a P.G. Wodehouse it doesn't matter a jot.
Every Story, no matter how reminiscent the plot, is a joy to read, and every character, from the stream of slightly defective pig-men to the ultimate, dapper, man-about-town Sir Galahad Threepwood, is perfectly crafted and described. Every one has its chuckle-out-loud moment and when not laughing you're smiling.
Wodehouse is the ultimate test of the "Marmite theorem": if you love one of his books you will love them all, dislike one (foul creature that you are) and you need never visit another. If you love P. G. W., buy this book - and then all the others.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 29, 2009 12:01 PM GMT


SnowFox XT105 SD Card MP3 Player
SnowFox XT105 SD Card MP3 Player

54 of 59 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Cheap but a bizarre design., 10 Mar. 2007
As an example of design quirkiness at an affordable price this MP3 SD player is hard to beat, but as your main portable music source - I don't think so. I bought this to play my SD based stuff while my PDA was away being repaired and for this it has sufficed.

The unit's overall sound is pretty good, it plays WMA files and can be used as a memo recorder (do people really do that?), it is compact and reasonably stylish looking, rectangular but rounded, fridge white rather than I-Pod white but light to carry and useable.

Everything else about the device is, well, quirky. Putting in the battery involves solving a sort of Chinese puzzle, requiring great strength combined with watchmaker dexterity. With the battery in place your next surprise it that the display is almost, but not quite, unreadable. Making sure you have good light, outdoors but with high cloud cover is best, you carefully angle the unit until you can see the main body of the text - remember what it said because you will no longer be able to read it when you adjust the angle to check the microscopic row of hieroglyphs in the shadow at the top of the screen.

Next weird design innovation is with the ear bud headphones. These are grey, unlike the rest of the unit, have a round plastic device (which you at first hope might be a remote control but turns out to be a release clip for a tiny piece of cord securing the phones to the player), and has leads which are about a foot long and are mostly made of string. They sound OK, but this is irrelevant as nobody would ever wear them. The loop of string makes it look like you have borrowed Larry Grayson's spectacles and have a naff white medallion bouncing about on your solar plexus (there is no belt clip on the player), or, presumably, in the case of the fuller-figured lady, tucked uncomfortably into the cleavage. You'll quickly replace them with a proper set.

The cardboard box the device is supplied in is superb, sturdy, shiny and with a wonderful magnetic lock. It is way too good for the unit and will quickly be earmarked for collections of small, useful, thingamajigs from around the house.

Finally the pièce de résistance; the instruction manual. This is a surrealist masterpiece. It is as much use as a source of useful information as a BT call centre. Translated word by word from an oriental language it transports you to a Manga-like world where "CD" becomes "Light Dish" and your attention is drawn, with a deep sense of menace and foreboding, to warnings such as: "The in bar of data in the MP3 throws to lose, at connect computer before certainly close the MP3 power supply, if conjunction computer have no any manifestation, please check broadcast the MP3 player or with its conjoint USB connection the line if the conjunction is good". Superb and worth the money alone!
Comment Comments (7) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 14, 2010 11:42 AM BST


Can You Forgive Her? (Wordsworth Classics)
Can You Forgive Her? (Wordsworth Classics)
by Anthony Trollope
Edition: Paperback

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An introduction to the Pallisers, 25 Feb. 2001
The central story of this novel follows the fortunes of Alice Vavasor as she wavers between two men and two lifestyles. The aptly named Mr Grey has the merit of truly caring for Alice rather than her money whereas her cousin George's suit seems based on ambition, freedom from debt and a desire to outdo his rival. The choices seem simple to the reader but Alice's stubborn nature is combined with a fickle moodiness that makes her follow a more complex path. Her attachment to her cousin thus seems harder and harder to understand as it becomes clear she guesses that a spiteful greed and hatred underlies his outer veneer. Later in the story, however, the light from the flawed character of Alice is almost lost in the glare from the vibrant Glencora, wife of the rich and powerful politician Plantagenet Palliser. Lady Glencora has already faced a very similar choice to that of Alice and is now trying to live with that decision. The Pallisers almost steal the show; setting-up the reader to enjoy the series of "Palliser" novels of which this is the first. This tale combines Trollope's excellent use of language with some memorable characters and events, all of which should hold the attention of anyone who enjoys classic satirical fiction.


The Eustace Diamonds (Wordsworth Classics)
The Eustace Diamonds (Wordsworth Classics)
by Anthony Trollope
Edition: Paperback

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Combining beauty with selfishness, pride, greed & deceit, 25 Feb. 2001
The Eustace Diamonds follows the declining fortunes of a beautiful but devious anti-heroine Lady Lizzie Eustace. A young widow of relatively wealthy means, Lizzie becomes entangled, or rather entangles herself in a series of legal muddles as she attempts to hold on to a fabulous necklace from her late husband's family estate. Through her scheming and deceitfulness she manages to reduce her options from many to one and alienate all her would-be friends and lovers. Anthony Trollope again employs all his considerable wit and craft in this the third of the "Palliser" novels. My personal favourite of his literary tricks occurs as he lays down the background history of Lizzie Eustace and with perfect timing, warns us against comparison with Thackeray's Becky Sharpe just at the moment I was doing so. Lizzie is not a likeable protagonist and the main story does not end as decisively as I would have liked but this is still an exceptionally enjoyable read for fans of Anthony Trollope.


Doctor Thorne (Wordsworth Classics)
Doctor Thorne (Wordsworth Classics)
by Anthony Trollope
Edition: Paperback

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Barsetshire novel in Trollopes gently satirical style, 24 Feb. 2001
This is the third of the Barsetshire novels and the first to leave behind the trials and tribulations of Hiram's Hospital. Typical of Trollope's subtle humour the first literary trick of this book is the title since the Doctor himself, though not exactly a minor character, is in many ways almost an overseer of the plot rather than the true hero of the story. That honour goes to his neice Mary, whose strange origin is the event that underlies the plot. So cleverly does Trollope bring us close to Mary and her plight that he has the reader practically wishing for the death of a character so that Mary's happiness might be secured. This book contains an array of interesting characters, as you would expect from Anthony Trollope, but is a little less complex than some of the "Palliser" and other novels.


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