Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 50% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now Shop now
Profile for Gareth M. Duggan > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Gareth M. Duggan
Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,221,607
Helpful Votes: 55

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Gareth M. Duggan "garethduggan" (Birmingham, UK)

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2
pixel
Executive Orders
Executive Orders
by Tom Clancy
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars "What I would do if I was president" by Tom Clancy, 3 Aug. 2007
This review is from: Executive Orders (Paperback)
This book had some of Clancy's characteristic plotting strengths so was fun and engaging, but ultimately it boiled down to Clancy coming up with a way of telling us all of the things he would love to do if he was president. Fair enough, and not badly written either, but not up there with his best.


Red Rabbit
Red Rabbit
by Tom Clancy
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Dross, 3 Aug. 2007
This review is from: Red Rabbit (Mass Market Paperback)
Clancy used to be my guilty pleasure, the guy I read when my brain was tired of deeper material. Crash, bang, wallop, the good guys always win and enough a plot that (mostly) to hide the general shallowness of the characters. But Red Rabbit is astonishingly one-dimensional and poorly written for a man who is capable of much better. I will drop this back at the charity shop where it belongs and re-read Without Remorse and maybe Red Storm Rising to remind myself that this guy can write a decent yarn when he's on form.


Weapons of Choice: World War 2.1 - Alternative History Science Fiction (Axis of Time Trilogy 1)
Weapons of Choice: World War 2.1 - Alternative History Science Fiction (Axis of Time Trilogy 1)
by John Birmingham
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Clever stuff from a man who can really write, 20 July 2007
John Birmingham can write, he does his research and treats the reader with respect. In these three ways he stands head and shoulders above just about everyone else who has written alternative history recently.
As well as the much-commented upon social commentary aspects of this book, I found particular enjoyment in the fact that he was going backwards AND forwards. That is, he first imagined a pretty complex future and then he projected those people and their technology back into history. Doing this took no small amount of skill, and for that I salute him.
I enjoyed the book, loved the image of Lonesome Jones bawling out the racist WWII marine and thought some of the concepts were handled well. The issue of copyrighted material being taken back to a time before it was even conceived let alone produced was very clever, and the logistics issues of fuel and armaments for modern weapons systems was also addressed well.
I'm not sure US armed forces will ever hand over weapons to embeddded journos, but I picked that whole aspect as parody anyway. In fact, the whole trilogy came across as Birmingham thoroughly enjoying himself, with rip-roaring battle scenes interspersed with clever ideas, dialogue and satire. It's not War and Peace, but it's not meant to be. Enjoy!


Dispatches (Picador)
Dispatches (Picador)
by Michael Herr
Edition: Paperback

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Frenetic, flickery-eyed genius, 5 Oct. 2006
This review is from: Dispatches (Picador) (Paperback)
This is the sort of writing that tosses into a mixing bowl the fluid, stream-of-consciousness style of Kerouac and the clear-eyed cynicism of Conrad. The end result is often confusing, garbled, shocking, violent, disconnected, but is an eye-opening account of what it feels like to be fighting an unwinnable war. This is not the strategy, logistics, politics and posturing that often surrounds our modern view of the Viet Nam War. It is what it was really like for the American fighting man on the ground, regardless of how you feel about the morals of the war or those men in the first place. And it also provides some uncomfortable parallels between what happened in Viet Nam then and what is happening in Iraq and Afghanistan now.


Remembranza
Remembranza
Price: £9.31

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Darker, deeper and better, 22 Sept. 2005
This review is from: Remembranza (Audio CD)
Murcof exploded into western musical awareness with Martes, remixed that into the magic of Utopia and now comes at us with a more soulful and more complex vision with Remembranza. From the outset, any fan of the Mexican genius will recognise his trademark classical influences (Henryk Gorecki and Arvo Part are but two) but the he has taken his music a step on from both his previous two albums. Greater diversity and a touch more determination to push his own boundaries combine in an altogether darker, richer work. This may seem unlikely given the powerfully haunting string sounds that marked out both Martes and Utopia, but the secret to Remembranza is the depth of the music. Focus on the quirky but almost unnerving tweaks of noise and suddenly you find yourself diverted by a powerful undercurrent of moody strings. And just when you're being seduced by a soul-searching stanza, he whips you along with a subtle change of pace. Overall this is a man on the move musically, just as he is with his own move from Mexico to Spain. It is unmistakably Murcof but it is just as clearly a new, deeper and even more fascinating Murcof than before. Buy it, love it, but don't play it to get the party going.


Football Manager 2005 (Mac/PC CD)
Football Manager 2005 (Mac/PC CD)

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Please help me, 20 July 2005
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I am trapped in a virtual world in which Tottenham are now English, European and World champions, and I have so much money to spend on players I don't know what to do with it. I spent five minutes raging at the cheek of Middlesborough in demanding £14m for Stewart Downing, then bought him anyway. This world is so utterly convincing I am having trouble dealing with reality.
In short: If you want the most immersive and compelling football management experience short of actually being Jose More-ego then BUY THIS GAME!


Quicksilver: The Baroque Cycle (Baroque Cycle 1)
Quicksilver: The Baroque Cycle (Baroque Cycle 1)
by Neal Stephenson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.68

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Historical whirl, 28 Jun. 2005
First of all, I take my hat off to Mr Stephenson for maintaining the astonishing level of concentration that must have been required to produce a work of this length and depth. It swings between high science and low morals, bounces from boudoir to battelfield and gleefully tosses vagabonds and thugs into league with nobles, gentleladies and savants. In Jack Shaftoe, Stephenson has created a rough-edged hero for the ages: a man whose charisma, cunning and joie de vivre are matched only by his ability to find himself in and out of the most outrageous situations. Daniel Waterhouse should be the baseline for any author studying extended character development, as he grows from a geeky, uncertain scholar quivering in the shadow of Sir Isaac Newton into a man of influence and wisdom able to stare down the same Newton years later. Eliza? She's every smart man's dream come true, with her beauty, wit and steely, almost scary intellect.
And as Stephenson stitches these marvellous lead characters into his masterwork he adds the enigmatic Enoch Root, Louis XIV, the Duke of Marlborough and dozens of others with a rich, inventive style.
This is history for sci-fi geeks, science for history buffs and a rattling good read for anyone else. Shaftoe's swaggering adventures provide the ribaldry, Waterhouse's dance on the cuttinig edge of science gives an intellectual depth and the machinations of Eliza are both love story and political thriller.
Read it now, then go get the two sequels and read them as well. Be prepared for occasional heavy going, because you don't get depth without some painstaking and sometimes overhwelming detail, but ultimately this is the most satisfying historical read since Michener was at the peak of his powers.


Page: 1 | 2