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K. Manwaring (United Kingdom)
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NEW LAPTOP BATTERY FOR Acer Aspire 5535 5536 5735 AS07A31 5738Z 5738G AS07A75 UK
NEW LAPTOP BATTERY FOR Acer Aspire 5535 5536 5735 AS07A31 5738Z 5738G AS07A75 UK

3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars, 10 Nov. 2014
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fine.


VEDONEIRE 3050-BLACK-L
VEDONEIRE 3050-BLACK-L
Offered by Vedoneire
Price: £99.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, 1 Aug. 2014
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Does what you want a wax jacket to do. Ideal for summer riding on the bike.


New Oxide Black Rider Large Tek leather Motorcycle Panniers bike panniers motorcycle saddlebags travel bag
New Oxide Black Rider Large Tek leather Motorcycle Panniers bike panniers motorcycle saddlebags travel bag
Offered by Oxide Ltd
Price: £79.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars look good, & fit snug on my Triumph Legend, 1 Aug. 2014
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Solid, well-made, look good, & fit snug on my Triumph Legend. Perfect for adventures!


Hadrian's Wall Path (National Trail Guides)
Hadrian's Wall Path (National Trail Guides)
by Anthony Burton
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.09

4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, 1 Aug. 2014
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Has it all covered. Clearly formatted and well illustrated.


Mens Denim Kevlar Linned Biker Motorbike Motorcycle Trousers Pants Jeans (W34 L34)
Mens Denim Kevlar Linned Biker Motorbike Motorcycle Trousers Pants Jeans (W34 L34)
Offered by newfacelook

3.0 out of 5 stars Wearing them often - good for the summer, 1 Aug. 2014
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Decent for the price. Bit tight round the crotch. Kevlar lining is not comprehensive, but all the vital bits covered. Wearing them often - good for the summer.


Songcatcher [DVD] [1999] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
Songcatcher [DVD] [1999] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
Dvd ~ Janet McTeer
Offered by supermart_usa
Price: £5.35

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A charming sortee into the Appalachians, 20 April 2014
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A well-acted fictional portrait of Olive Dame Campbell -
captures the culture of the mountain music well.
Some fine tunes.
McTeer and Quinn deliver the goods.


The Ocean at the End of the Lane
The Ocean at the End of the Lane
by Neil Gaiman
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £13.59

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fluffy Must Die, 29 Nov. 2013
This was a light read - I enjoyed it, but it felt a bit like a Chinese take-away. That's not to say Gaiman's prose isn't polished: he's a natural storyteller (though perhaps not the 'genius' he's made out to be). The problem might lie in the material - which apparently originated at a short story, until the author was persuaded to work it up into a novel. No wonder it feels like a short narrative stretched thin - giving the novel a threadbare quality - but unlike Gaiman's leitmotif, that there is a deeper darker world below the brittle surface of reality, here it feels like there is little beneath. Although Gaiman light touch is a sign of his confidence and experience, it feels like there is a lack of substance at times. The fey, whimsical style is an act - but pull off the mask and there is nothing there (which you don't feel in the case of other prose minimalists such as Hemingway, Carver, and McCarthy). It worked in Stardust, but not here. Certainly Gaiman captures the disturbing world of childhood vividly, as he relates the backstory of the forty-something protagonist, returning home for a parental funeral, world-weary and wondering where the magic has gone. He revisits a curious old farm where he hung out as a kid - the scene of weird and wonderful shennanigans which would make for a good episode of Doctor Who (which of course he writes for, brilliantly - but here, the televisual quality makes for Mcprose at times). The three Hempstock women who dwell on the farm are certainly memorable characters with mythic quality: homely versions of the Triple-aspect Goddess, no less. The villainess of the piece, the nanny from Hell, is sexy and dangerous (and strangely pathetic). Yet the whole affair has a cosy quality (perhaps because his test-audience were initially his wife and children). However 'scary' things seem to get, you know nothing's going to get too bad. It is a nostalgia piece - a midlife crisis fantasy, yet told in a child-like fashion. One hopes Gaiman connects with his adult Muse in his next offering. More American Gods please!


Some Kind of Fairy Tale
Some Kind of Fairy Tale
by Graham Joyce
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Utterly spell-binding, 19 Nov. 2013
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Some Kind of Fairy Tale
Graham Joyce

I have a problem. I am now convinced, having just finished Some Kind of Fairy Tale, that Graham Joyce, is the modern genius of British Fantasy. The realisation didn't impair my enjoyment of the novel (I haven't read a novel which I have enjoyed so much in ages), but it does make me envious. A green-eyed monster, looking on like Grendel in the Fens at Joyce's Heorot-hall of talent. Like I say, a problem. Putting professional envy aside, this modern exploration of the dark world of Faerie is layered with the psychological ambiguity, wit, snappy dialogue, and tense plotting which is becoming something of a trademark of Joyce.
The story is simple enough - after vanishing twenty years ago in mysterious circumstances a woman claiming to be Tara Martin turns up, to the astonishment and dismay of her parents and brother, Peter. She is, beyond a shadow of a doubt, his long-lost sister - except for one troubling detail: she hasn't apparently aged in two decades. When her inexplicable absence is finally explained it doesn't make matters easier: she claims to have been taken by 'Fairies', and has been trapped in their world for, what seemed to her, six months. The story explores the various reactions to this - shock, incredulity, anger, scepticism, acceptance - via a small cast of exquisitely drawn characters: each one a flawed lense; each one memorable and convincing, for example, Richie, the comi-tragic guitarist boyfriend of Tara whose life has been damaged, irredeemably it seems, by his girlfriend's disappearance (he became a suspect). As the pressure of this Flatland-reality dealing with this dimensional incursion builds the cracks begin to show - and the fault-lines are there from the start as the opening line suggests:

In the deepest heart of England there is a place where everything is at fault.

This is a novel with a strong sense of place, evoking the specific genius loci of Joyce's Leicestershire countryside - a territory he is making his own, through his distinctively dark glass of Magic Realism. Joyce's uncanny paradigm is grounded in the all-too-prosaic mundane, and magical events are subtlely layered to give different 'readings'. Here, Tara's abduction claim is deconstructed by a mercurial psychologist, Vivian Underwood, whose notes provide a meta-narrative on the nature of fairy tales and fabulation itself. We have entered Marina Warner-esque woods here, layered with meaning and cross-cultural references. The erudite epigraphs adds to the inter-textuality. And yet each 'authority' is challenged - every heirophantic expert has feet of clay and no paradigm is left inviolate. Borders are continually transgressed - both physical and metaphysical. The nature of truth in Joyce's universe is Morphean and wriggles out of our grasp with each accretion of detail. And yet the reader is left dazzled and sated - for the author is in command of his craft, and has created a tighly-structured and beautifully-rendered story which delivers the magic while simultaneously breaking the spell. Joyce is a literary magician of the first order.

Kevan Manwaring


The Silver Bough
The Silver Bough
by Lisa Tuttle
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Autumnal Comfort Reading, 14 Nov. 2013
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This review is from: The Silver Bough (Paperback)
If you are looking for autumnal comfort reading with a magic sheen – look no further. Tuttle's charming tale of an enchanted Scottish town – the invented near-island of Appleton – has a strong sense of place, some distinctive characters, and a clever blend of Celtic mythology and apple folklore. Tuttle slowly builds up a painstaking level of detail in the town's idiosyncracies – architectural, topographical and human – thus establishing some verisimillitude, before the magic starts to leak in from the Otherworld. The pace is gentle, and the multi-linear narrative is soap opera-esque at times, as we hopscotch from one plot thread to another – creating a tartan weave which conveys the interlacement of the community, and the entangled skein of past and present generations, but somewhat dissipates the tension (except for one taboo-busting kiss which is 'frozen' for a whole intervening chapter). However, there are faults – the odd maggot-hole in the polished facade; a few too many Americans shoe-horned in for my liking – as though this was an episode of Downton Abbey pitched at the US market. And sometimes characters slip into 'download', e.g. ex-rock star Dave Varney, who suddenly seems very knowledgeable about esoteric matters. There is the odd unleavened expositional 'lump' e.g. at one point the narrative needlessly states: 'To ancient Celts, heaven was to be found on an island in the west.' But on the whole Tuttle serves up an appetising harvest supper – revelling in the many associations of apples, orchards, forbidden fruit and temptation. The build up – as a tsunami of magic breaks over the town – is better than the denouement. The depiction of the Fairy Folk – who start to crop up in unexpected ways – is refreshingly unsentimental, unglamourous, and edgy. Fairy tale tropes begin to manifest in this realistic setting – and Tuttle has fun with these. Yet on the whole I felt the main protagonists left me cold – I couldn't really relate or care for any of them. Yet, what redeems the whole tale is the depiction of the library as the heart of the community – and the hub of the narrative – and the use of different kinds of 'found' text, invented and actual, to create a lovely sense of the power of printed matter in building and sustaining an illusion. Worth checking out, but it hardly qualifies for one of the '10 Best British Fantasy Novels' as a Guardian feature earlier this year claimed. Someone has been on the cider.


The Rings Of Saturn
The Rings Of Saturn
by W G Sebald
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Fulfillment of Empty Spaces, 28 May 2013
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This review is from: The Rings Of Saturn (Paperback)
In this astonishing meditation on mortality, transience and the absurdities of civilisation, Sebald performs a circumnavigation of both the forlorn landscape of East Anglia and his own mind. Sebald is endlessly fascinated about everything, and in reading his erudite digressions, the reader feels as though they are accompanying a wise and entertaining travelling companion on a series of eccentric perambulations, in which spontaneous 'strayings from the path' become a lunatic's itinerary. Yet even if one might feel Panchez-like to these Quixotic tilting at windmills, we are never short-changed. Sebald, for all his vast knowledge, is a habitual storyteller, a master anecdotalist. His melancholic ramblings are often leavened by moments of wry humour - comic observations of the crapness of modern life: the entropic edifices of a geriatric empire gazing sadly out to sea. 'Forlorness' is a word he uses to capture this Ozymandian-ambience. And yet, the sheer act of composing this hallucinatory travelogue - beautifully-crafted sentences contained within vast paragraphs which can last several pages - is an act of artistic defiance in the face of inevitable oblivion. One cannot help but feel enriched from reading this masterpiece of psychogeography - in its singular prose style eschewing the chummy reportage of some modern travel books. It makes you want to pull on those walking boots, grab a notebook and head for the empty spaces.


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