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The Unlikely Pilgrimage Of Harold Fry
The Unlikely Pilgrimage Of Harold Fry
Price: £3.66

5.0 out of 5 stars Very touching, 2 Feb. 2014
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I don't know what I expected, but what I found was a very touching story about the raw fragility of life.


Eerie Britain 1 & 2: Twenty of Britain's Most Terrifying and Peculiar Real-Life Stories
Eerie Britain 1 & 2: Twenty of Britain's Most Terrifying and Peculiar Real-Life Stories
by M B Forde
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.30

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A captivating read, 5 Jan. 2014
Imagine the best ghost walk you've ever been on (or heard of) and then imagine that the guide isn't bound by time or distance - able to take you to any year and any place within the British Isles. That is the experience Eerie Britain offers, and I was transfixed from the moment I began.

Forde covers tales that will be familiar to anyone who knows their stuff when it comes to hauntings across Britain - from the McKenzie Poltergeist, Ghosts of the London Underground and Gef the talking Mongoose to the South Bridge vaults, Highgate Cemetery, The Skirrid Mountain Inn and more... but even though I was familiar with most of the stories covered there was something captivating about the way in which Forde explores them. Those who aren't familiar with any of the stories covered will surely find these books a delight.

This is a book that transports you away from where you sit and throws you into the ghost story. The fact that the stories in this book retell real experiences that people have reported to have had is even more intriguing. Another strength of Forde's is his inclusion of the more skeptical conclusions and ideas that surround each case, allowing readers to make their own minds up.


Extra Sensory: The Science and Pseudoscience of Telepathy and Other Powers of the Mind
Extra Sensory: The Science and Pseudoscience of Telepathy and Other Powers of the Mind
Price: £14.69

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thorough, fair and enjoyable!, 30 July 2013
In this book Clegg doesn't simply do what would be easiest and dismiss powers of the mind like remote viewing, ESP or Telekinesis as impossible as so many people would. Instead he really examines the evidence and the historic experiments conducted into these alleged extra senses, getting into the nitty-gritty, to see if there really is anything of worth.

I started the book with some trepidation because although I was told the book took `a balanced skeptical view of psi phenomena, rather than the usual totally-pro or totally-anti approach` I was still skeptical and thought the book would be too pro or too anti - I was proven wrong. There are few books that strike a truly balanced, informed, fair-yet-reasoned approach to the subject being researched, but Clegg has managed just that with Extra Sensory and I have learnt so much while reading it.

The book covers everything you might need to know about the scientific effort to test ESP; the role magicians can and do play in the scientific research of such powers, the fact that we do all have more than Five senses naturally (e.g the ability to sense heat when near the source), and the scientific research conducted - from Joseph Banks Rhine to Ganzfield, Abner Shimoney right through to the very recent trials of one Daryl Bem. Extra Sensory explores all of the research and results, maintaining a fair-yet-rational approach while doing so, and reasonably concludes that positive results in such trials seem to be caused by bad methodology, massaging of statistics or cherry picking, or bad controls being put in place (or not put in place at all!)

The thing I enjoyed most about the book was the way in which Clegg didn't just make these assertions in a dismissive or patronising manner, but actually helped to build up a bigger picture for the reader by laying out all the necessary information. In the end I found I was picking out the flaws in the research being written about before I even reached the criticisms. Also, unlike a lot of skeptical people I have encountered, Clegg points out that past failures are by no means a reason to not continue to test these alleged abilities.

I would recommend this book to anyone with a passing interest is telekinesis, ESP, remote viewing, clairvoyance, precognition, psychokinesis and other powers of the mind. If you're interested in the work of people like James Randi and Derren Brown I think you'll learn a lot from this enjoyable read. Extra Sensory isn't as in depth as other books that cover the work of particular researchers mentioned, but Extra Sensory provides a great overview of a complicated subject while not being too vague or dismissive (though I did find the chapters on Quantum Mechanics to be quite heavy reading). It is a wonderful book that I think will be enjoyed by those who know both a lot or a little about extra sensory abilities... but you probably knew I was going to say that.


UFO's Werewolves & The Pig-Man: Exposing England's Strangest Location - Cannock Chase
UFO's Werewolves & The Pig-Man: Exposing England's Strangest Location - Cannock Chase
by Lee Brickley
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable read, yet slightly biased, 30 July 2013
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There is no doubting the passion the Lee Brickley holds for the paranormal legacy of Cannock Chase.

The book begins with a brief look at some of the weird historic highlights of Cannock Chase and then in the following chapters breaks down the weird happenings in the area into categories such as `Alien encounters', `Wild Beasts', `Legend of the Pig Man', `Ghostly Goings on' and `Top Secret Military Activity'.

However, as soon as I began to read the book any excitement I'd held before turned into slight disappointment because throughout, the quality of the book is often let down by Brickley's biased narrative and irrational leaps of logic.

For example, from the off Brickley states that he believes that the odd things occurring in the area are possibly caused by an inter-dimensional portal and that a series of animal mutilations for which a culprit was never found were possibly the result of Alien visitors - notions that are both irrational conjecture. In another instance Brickley doesn't consider whether it is possible for Werewolves to exist at all, but instead whether it is possible for them to manifest during daylight.

Criticism aside, the accounts in the book are very interesting to read, and the experiences reported are genuinely scary to learn about, and I did feel a bit creeped out by some of the things people reported witnessing. The book is a fun read for anyone who has ever had an interest in the weirder side of Cannock Chase, but it often feels as though Brickley is doing his best to convince you that his beloved Cannock Chase is worthy of your attention. That said, I think it is worthy of our attention. The book has certainly made me want to visit the area and learn more. I hope Brickley will write more in the future, but perhaps work slightly on keeping the narrative a bit more structured.


Where the Ghosts Walk: The Gazetteer of Haunted Britain
Where the Ghosts Walk: The Gazetteer of Haunted Britain
Price: £9.00

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great read for fans of ghost stories, 30 July 2013
There have been Ghost Folklore books in my home for as long as I can remember. It's a symptom (if that's the right word) of growing up with a mother who has always had an interest in the paranormal, which is where I inherited my own fascination from. I mostly read books about the Paranormal folklore of Wiltshire or the West Country, but have on occasion read books about locations all across the UK.

None of them, it has to be said, stand up to `Where the Ghosts Walk' by Peter Underwood. This is the book that anyone with an interest in ghosts need to read. The detail in this book is wonderful, and I found myself unable to put it down on numerous occasions because I was caught up in a story or two. The photos provided by Underwood himself compliment the stories wonderfully, and many are of Underwood himself exploring the grounds of reputedly haunted buildings which bring a lovely personal touch to it. Many paranormal folklore books have a feeling of laziness about them because it seems the author has simply rewritten other peoples experiences, but Where the Ghosts Walk is a bit different because it is obvious that Underwood cares for each of the tales he writes about.

Obviously stories do not make evidence of the existence of ghosts, but I've always felt that Ghost Folklore plays an even bigger role in such research by telling us what people think and how they perceive weird occurrences around them. The number of stories within Where the Ghosts Walk is impressive, and the narrative is often gripping. This is a book that took me back to my days as a teenage ghost hunter and I would recommend it to anyone who has ever found delight in a good old-fashioned ghost story.


The Hunger and the Howling of Killian Lone
The Hunger and the Howling of Killian Lone
by Will Storr
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.74

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Disturbing in a 'can't put down' way, 23 May 2013
Though this book was disturbing in many parts, the way in which it is written meant I found that even though I was recoiling slightly I still couldn't put the book down. It's a dark story, but utterly fascinating too.


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