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Fanzines
Fanzines
by Teal Triggs
Edition: Paperback
Price: £16.56

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a fantastic visual record, 9 Feb. 2012
This review is from: Fanzines (Paperback)
This book is a really valuable visual record and celebration of zines. Although the ethos of zines may well not be to 'enter into history' and become known by those outside of their specific supporters, they are testimony to autonomous self-expression and creativity, which is inspirational and a spirit worth spreading! The book gathers together a fantastic range of examples and puts a useful and historical trajectory together. Its BIG, not very zine like in scale but this facilitates images that do justice to the zines themselves. Lastly, as indicated in some of the comments the book has caused controversy about permissions/copyright for SOME of the publications included. (the claim of 'most' simply historically can't be true!) The passion with which this campaign is being conducted says a lot (as does the use of the internet to conduct it). The dissemination by 'professional researchers' (despite their own background and passions) into 'the mainstream' of an essentially marginal, independant activity always raises some questions and potential charges of exploitation and self-interest. For me the bigger picture here is the commentary I began the review with.


Left Shift: Radical Art in 1970s Britain
Left Shift: Radical Art in 1970s Britain
by John A. Walker
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Useful but a bit uneven, 11 Nov. 2011
This is written like an annotated directory to 1970s radical art activities in the UK. It is divided up by year, each section starting with a list of political events that presumably Walker feels set the context. This doesn't make for very fluid reading and in truth the book feels as though it has been written in a hurry. That said it is a very useful resource and Walker writes knowledgeably about much of the art and context he describes. Certain artists are given considerably more space than others - the reason seemingly being not that what they were doing was necessarily more 'significant' or representative but simply that Walker knew them or is personally more interested, which makes for an uneveness in the book as a whole. However what Walker does well in several places is pick up on the conflicts between different ideas of radical practice -- and issues of reception, again demonstrating an informed, often 'insider' sense of his subject. So overall a lot of useful content and as such recommended, but to my mind this has the makings of much better and more readable book - maybe he or someone else will do a revised edition at some point.


British Social Movements Since 1945: Sex, Colour, Peace and Power (Contemporary History in Context)
British Social Movements Since 1945: Sex, Colour, Peace and Power (Contemporary History in Context)
by Adam Lent
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £88.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Recommended, 26 Sept. 2011
Academic books like this are short runs, presumably mostly published for libraries -- given their extremely hefty cover price. I have been referencing this book for a number of years, reading it in the British Library and finally decided to get my own copy - it is an excellent overview of British social movements of a particular period and the various factors that modified those movements, such as the availability of funding through the municipal socialism and so on of the 1980s. If you are studying a particular social movement from the period the book covers, this is a really useful contextual source, written by someone who from my reading has a nuanced appreciation and understanding of the politics and concerns covered. Highly recommended. Get your library to buy it if possible.


Breaching the Peace: a collection of radical feminist papers
Breaching the Peace: a collection of radical feminist papers
by Various
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Classic critique of womens peace movement, 17 April 2011
This was published by the London based radical feminist publishers Onlywomen Press at a time when the women's peace camp at Greenham Common, (an RAF base in Berkshire, UK, that was to be the site for nuclear cruise missiles) was one of the most visible feminist protests, and one which gathered often unquestioning support from many within the women's movement. The short essays in this pamphlet critique the validity of the Greenham protest, the traditional alignment of women with 'making peace' and the encampment's overall relevance for the women's liberation movement, suggesting instead that 'Greenham and the whole nuclear issue is a diversion for women' (back cover page).


I Used to be Nice: Sexual Affairs (Sexual Politics)
I Used to be Nice: Sexual Affairs (Sexual Politics)
by Sue O'Sullivan
Edition: Hardcover

4.0 out of 5 stars insight into a participant view of UK feminist debates, 17 April 2011
This is a fascinating collection of essays by O'Sullivan (who was to become significantly involved with the feminist magazine Spare Rib, Feminist Review and then Sheba publishers) that charts her own move into the UK womens liberation movement in the late 1960s and tracks a wide range of debates within British feminism from that time onwards. For a personalised, reflexive and engaging historical account, that openly explores the many contradictory and difficult positions within an increasingly fragmented/diversified movement, I strongly recommend this to anyone interested in the history of so called 'second wave' feminism in the UK.


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