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TJ Hill (UK)

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Advancing Physics: AS Student Book Second Edition: Student Text Book
Advancing Physics: AS Student Book Second Edition: Student Text Book
by Jon Ogborn
Edition: Paperback
Price: £24.41

0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Advancing Physics versus traditional Physics, 24 Mar. 2012
The comments here on this text book are generalised. There were over 400 physics teachers who contributed to this book so it's unlikely that they all fouled up. Yes there are many mistakes but the book was rushed out in 2000 when numbers pursuing physics A level in this country were falling alarmingly. I have taught Nuffield Physics, Advancing Physics, and virtually all traditional courses, currently AQA A. The book and course is for the more able student and probably the more experienced physics teacher. The Nuffield course shared similar criticisms. The course is ideally aimed at students who will go on to study physics and/or engineering at University. All others, perhaps the majority group, will require a different approach and course. The stark traditional course offered by AQA (Physics A) with its superb support texts, questions and other resources would suit this latter group. You can't lambast this book, anyone doing so should have researched the course and then made the right decision for their students. Comments should be directed at the nature of the course and not the book. Metaphorically, you can't buy a German book for a French course and then complain it's useless.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 4, 2014 3:38 PM BST


The 4-Percent Universe: Dark Matter, Dark Energy, and the Race to Discover the Rest of Reality
The 4-Percent Universe: Dark Matter, Dark Energy, and the Race to Discover the Rest of Reality
by Richard Panek
Edition: Paperback

6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The title is misleading, 18 July 2011
The book takes a look at the competition facing astronomers and physicists in achieving recognition for their research in areas of cosmology. There is a strong bias towards work in the USA and contributions from elsewhere in our understanding of the Universe are glibly passed over. The title implies that the physics of dark matter and dark energy will be explored but the amount of physics detailing these issues is minimal. I wonder what audience the book is aimed at?


Listen Up!: Laboratory Exercises for Introductory Radio Astronomy with a Small Radio Telescope
Listen Up!: Laboratory Exercises for Introductory Radio Astronomy with a Small Radio Telescope
by Kiley Pulliam
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.95

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Misleading title, 3 Aug. 2010
The book should be called/imply Lab Exercises for Introductory Radio Astronomy at 1420 MHz with the MIT Haystack Small Radio Telescope. It assumes you own the latter instrument and the book has little potential if you don't. Pitched at UK post-16 study otherwise.


Vango Banshee 200 2012 - 2 Person Backpacking Tent
Vango Banshee 200 2012 - 2 Person Backpacking Tent

16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Vango Banshee 200, 15 April 2010
A good lightweight tent. Can be packed with inner fitted so that when pitching in bad weather, whole tent goes up in seconds. You lay it out, put the two poles through (even with cold wet hands its OK) and tension it with four pegs and you're ready to get your kit inside. Easiest tent I've owned to pitch. Groundsheet feels a tad thin but its waterproof. Room for one plus kit in comfort. Lacks cooking space in bad weather. I'm six foot exactly and can sit up to get dressed, but only just. Performs well in wet weather and high wind but it's not a mountain tent, more for lower level lightweight backpacking. I've always used the infamous Pro Action Tiger Paws one man tent but this is definitely a step up with a better groundsheet and more room.


The Master and His Emissary: The Divided Brain and the Making of the Western World
The Master and His Emissary: The Divided Brain and the Making of the Western World
by Iain Mcgilchrist
Edition: Hardcover

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A physicist's view......., 28 Feb. 2010
This book will undoubtedly be of great interest to psychologists, neuro-philosophers and generalists. However, as the author makes clear, it will be of limited value to physicists, mathematicians, logisticians and most scientists. The book at first reading seems to be an original interpretation of the argument between dualism and materialism, though the author makes it clear from the start that he is not a dualist. Here, rather than between good and evil, the argument is between the left and right brain. The author resorts mainly to a philosophical approach to an explanation of how the brain functions and takes the interpretation one stage further by inferring that the brain is further divided.

Science is more or less dismissed as reductionist. There is virtually no reference to the science beyond the early 20th century classical scientific theories, such as the modern quantum philosophies and the interpretations of space and time. These latter approaches extend well beyond the fundamental materialistic reductionisms. Modern science can be holistic and anthropic and physicists are the first to accept that their model (or metaphor?) may be incomplete. The author does however generously acknowledge that science may in the end be an alternative way of expressing the metaphor of the ultimate truth.

The book is divided into five parts really. The introduction is clear and sets the stage, the second and third larger parts are aptly described elsewhere. The penultimate part, master betrayed, could be read independently and is an excellent criticism and summary of the impact that computers, technology and speed of communication has had on modern society, though probably no less an impact than the Gutenberg's printing press which helped accelerate the Renaissance across Europe. The final part of the tome is a large notes section, characteristic of subject areas which do not have the luxury of a small number of explicit governing laws and principles, that make the life of a physicist happy and content.

In essence, a superb and thought-provoking book which gives me reassurance that I'm not the only one exhausted and dismayed by a bureaucratic, administrative, paper orientated, minutiae obsessed, ruled and regulated, anti-altruistic society.


The Quantum Frontier: The Large Hadron Collider
The Quantum Frontier: The Large Hadron Collider
by Don Lincoln
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £13.50

25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential general reading, 1 April 2009
This is a good read generally. It is well written, easy to follow and quite amusing in places. It is appropriate to someone familiar with physics, say GCSE, A level or maybe even undergraduate level who want a quick review of the LHC and particle physics. The first two sections on the Standard Model, the forces of nature and what we hope to find out are interesting but could have contained more detail about the Big Bang, though the author does excuse himself for not covering this aspect in detail. The section on the accelerator itself is probably the best part of the book though it would have helped to have had a few more actual pictures rather than artist impressions. However this would have pushed the cost of the book up and at just over a tenner for a hardback, this book is excellent value for money and should be in every library. The section on detectors is a bit heavy going; better illustrations or pictures may have once more helped. The final section on a review of the future, 'where are we going', seemed a bit rushed and lacking in detail. All said and done, this book was an enjoyable read and suitable for anyone wanting to know a bit more about what the Large Hadron Collider is all about. I'm glad the author didn't make too much of a fuss about the risks involved as this is an area attracting unnecessary interest and media hype. Particle Physics, and physics generally, is the subject area to be in. The world wide web concept evolved from work at CERN, and it makes you wonder what new discoveries are around the corner. Physicists solve problems, and there's a few of them around at the moment!


PROACTION TIGERPAWS 1 MAN TENT
PROACTION TIGERPAWS 1 MAN TENT

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Tigerpaws pro action 1 man tent, 19 July 2008
This review is from: PROACTION TIGERPAWS 1 MAN TENT
I've gone through four of these tents over many years and given them a hard time. The green version from Argos finished about 2 years ago but recently, they have released a slightly more expensive, but identical in design, orange fly sheet version. It's the only tent I can find in which I can sit up without my head hitting the inner tent (I'm 6ft). It's over a metre at its apex. Few 1 man tents can boast this. The big problem with this tent is that the groundsheet leaks at pressure points. I've overcome this by packing a polythene ground sheet cut to fit. On one version, the main zip on the flysheet door failed but that's because the tent is under tension when pitched correctly. There's plenty of room for one man and his kit and an area by the door for cooking in bad weather. It's well ventilated too, never had a problem with condensation. I can pitch it in under 3 minutes. It's a relatively low weight tent too. Leaving out bags etc, you can get the weight down to under 4 lbs with a spare groundsheet. It's stood force ten on Dartmoor and Snowdonia and torrential rain many times. It's an amazing little tent. The design is second to none. I've tried many different tent designs, but this one is the bee's knees and incredible value for money


Random Acts Of Heroic Love
Random Acts Of Heroic Love
by Danny Scheinmann
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quantum Entanglement and random acts of heroic love, 12 April 2008
The author has combined two diametrically opposed situations. A gap year romance and travel, which in some ways is the zenith or a young person's dreams, and the antithesis of this situation; conditions during the First World War. The two are brought together by exploring the drive of the two lead characters' passionate love, and finally, not wishing to spoil the story, by another link. The authors underlying link of the story with modern quantum physics is original and clever. The quantum world, inaccessible to most, has strong rules and relationships which the author attempts to link to the concept of love. The quantum world is random and subject to the rules of chance. I am convinced that the author has incorporated the word random in the title to emphasise the chance aspect of love and relationships, though the drive of a man's love for a woman can shape his destiny, which is where the analogy with the quantum world ends.


The Little Book of the Big Bang: A Cosmic Primer (Little Book Series)
The Little Book of the Big Bang: A Cosmic Primer (Little Book Series)
by Craig J. Hogan
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £13.29

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A thought provoking review of the big bang, 24 July 2007
This little volume is actually a treasure. The book in a sense requires a grounding in physics and actually gives access to some original interpretations of difficult concepts in cosmology. The chapter detailing repulsive gravity and how it could be responsible for inflation is brilliant, and actually links into Guth's original work involving general relativity, with a small footnote explaining how pressure is important and how a tension can lead to negative pressure. The discussion showing how black holes are the reverse of the big bang is amongst the best literative and pedagogic physics I have come across. The relationship between repulsive aspects of quantum physics and attractive nature of exchange forces is a fascinating introduction to quantum physics and should be encouraged in all advanced texts. The aspect of scale, the physics of forces and the size of things, is well explained. I would like to see have seen more detail and reference to the concept of dark energy. I don't think the term dark energy is actually included anywhere. The ordering of the chapters and continuity is lacking in places but this is actually unavoidable since the author has achieved an original and refreshing approach to a very difficult area of theoretical physics. I have read the book several times, and reading the chapters in reverse order proved the more successful. A good read for teachers of cosmology.


An Introduction to the Standard Model of Particle Physics
An Introduction to the Standard Model of Particle Physics
by W. N. Cottingham
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £43.99

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading on the path to understanding the Higgs Boson, 21 April 2007
The Standard Model of Particle Physics is a Quantum Field Theory. Anyone pursuing an interest in QFT will be faced with demanding mathematics, but also rewarded with an unprecedented view of the symmetries (and broken symmetries) in nature. This book is one of the clearest on the market to help someone with a theoretical physics or mathematics degree to an appreciation of the Standard Model of particle physics and an understanding of the unification of the Electromagnetic, Weak and Strong forces in nature. The authors clearly take you step by step through the process of spontaneous symmetry breaking, essential for understanding why the Higgs Field (and its gauge Boson the Higgs particle) can endow particles with mass, and thus hint at the very nature of mass itself. Unless you are a full time professional, it will take many sittings to work through this book. However, it's finest aspect is that the book is unpretentious, and written by university educators with a view to being understood.


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