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Julian Middleton "juliancmiddleton"

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The Wicked [DVD]
The Wicked [DVD]
Dvd ~ devon Werkheiser
Offered by skyvo-direct
Price: £7.83

2.0 out of 5 stars PREDICTABLY MEDIOCRE, 25 Mar. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Wicked [DVD] (DVD)
I was on the hunt for a decent low budget horror movie...unfortunately I only fulfilled the 'low budget' aspect of my quest. In actuality The Wicked could probably have been at least semi-decent, if the director had paid attention to such elements as the creation of atmosphere, the building of supense, the evocation of fear and some cinematic style. The script is no great shakes but it offered enough opportunities to bring about an effective movie had it been handled differently. As it is The Wicked is a rather flat, uninvolving and fatally unscary movie that looks like it was shot for tv over a weekend, populated by weak performances, some wobbly digital effects and a large bag of cliches. It all owes a sizeable debt to The Blair Witch project too. The hunt for decent horror continues...


Take Me To The Mountain: Discovering the You That Never Dies
Take Me To The Mountain: Discovering the You That Never Dies
by Moyra Irving
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.50

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading for anyone pursuing spiritual growth and personal healing, 18 Sept. 2013
A remarkable work, conveying many spiritual truths with great simplicity and the authentic ring of personal experience. Guaranteed to prove both healing and redemptive. This is a book that you can put into physical practice, so you can enjoy the benefits of personal reflection and retreat at home, without needing to book on any kind of course. Highly recommended.


Life And Teachings Of The Masters Of The Far East: Vol 1 (Life & Teaching of the Masters of the Far East)
Life And Teachings Of The Masters Of The Far East: Vol 1 (Life & Teaching of the Masters of the Far East)
by Baird T. Spalding
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.51

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A True Classic, 23 Nov. 2010
For any aspiring spiritual seeker, this is surely a true classic and essential reading. Spaulding's extraordinary account of his adventures in the Himalayas in the 1890s brings home the reality of the Masters, their abilities, work and teachings, far more vividly than anything else I have read, including Autobiography of a Yogi. Dismissed as fantasy by some, the truth of these accounts will be perceived by those with eyes more open. Just magic stuff. Buy all six and devour them.


Blood On The Tracks
Blood On The Tracks
Price: £5.34

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars all-time masterpiece, 7 Jan. 2006
This review is from: Blood On The Tracks (Audio CD)
For me this is not only the greatest collection of love-songs popular music has ever produced, but the greatest collection of songs, full-stop. Following years in the wilderness after his extraordinary achievements in the sixties, Dylan returned in the mid-seventies, his prodigious gift rejuvenated by marital discord and a newly mature perspective that allowed for searingly insightful lyrics that he always denied to be self-revelatory (but of course were) and his best singing ever. The effect is just stunning. Hard to summarise in under ten thousand words, the whole thing is just shot through with universal truth. "We always did feel the same, we just saw it from a different point of view" indeed. If Dylan's earlier famous material is at times obscure and certainly bizarre, this album is unpretentious, dealing as it does with love and intimacy in a totally candid and razor-sharp fashion. NO other artist has turned his spotlight on this arena with the same intensity and articulacy - truly an album for all seasons. Perhaps its greatness lies as much as anything in the fact that he manages to bare his heart and soul while remaining supernaturally articulate. The artist himself never again quite scaled these heights, when his hand, his mind and his eye were together.


Magic Time
Magic Time
Offered by Media Vortex
Price: £23.49

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars schizophrenic partial return to form, 7 Jan. 2006
This review is from: Magic Time (Audio CD)
How many Van the Man fans stuck this in their CD player, listened with joy and astonishment to the first two tracks and then groaned out loud when the third came on? My guess is quite a few. Including yours truly. After a decade stuck in a creative downward spiral, Morrison here pens some of his best songs since the eighties; indeed half a dozen could easily have come from the twin masterpieces 'No Guru No Method No Teacher' and 'Poetic Champions Compose'. Unfortunately, interspersing these jewels are another half dozen bog-standard jazz and blues tracks, one of which (yep, the dreaded track 3) is ironically entitled 'Keep Mediocrity At Bay'. The Master can pen such forgettable ditties with his ears closed, and they curdle with the older, 'Celtic' sound. Taking the best two or three tracks from his last few albums and adding them to the new gems would basically create one great record. Surely the days have passed when this particular artist needs to put out a record a year. If he took a leaf out of Dylan's book and just recorded when truly inspired, he might yet generate a bona fide classic. As it is, 'Magic Time' is a flawed jewel.


Out are the Lights
Out are the Lights
by Richard Laymon
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.13

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars leave it!!, 6 Jan. 2006
This review is from: Out are the Lights (Paperback)
Richard Laymon's first two books, "The Cellar" and "The Woods Are Dark" respectively, are a couple of first-rate gut-crunching horror novels which succeed mostly via the author's fondness for going for the jugular at just about every opportunity, in terms of both his characters (functional but convincing) and readers. His prose is serviceable but highly readable and he is refreshing unpretentious. Alas this third book is dull, scattered and entirely lacking in drama or scares. What was he thinking? Several plotlines drift along and intermingle before the sudden ending. One of them concerns the making of snuff movies. Sounds promising! It isn't. Had he focussed on this one strand alone and maintained his earlier approach, the book may have succeeded, although there would probably have been way too many unintentional laughs. As it is, it's third time unlucky. Mute witnesses in wheelchairs? Twin sisters turning up? Obligatory sec scenes? Come off it!


Dylan: Behind Closed Doors - The Recording Sessions, 1960-94
Dylan: Behind Closed Doors - The Recording Sessions, 1960-94
by Clinton Heylin
Edition: Paperback

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential reference for Dylan fans, 7 Oct. 2005
What a cracking book this is! Probably due for an update around now, in fact. Heylin runs though all Dylan's albums documenting the sessions and commenting on the results. Of course such research covers the many outtakes and alternate versions languishing in the vaults, a process which makes it essential reading for anyone interested in the work of the master songwriter. The author doesn't hesitate to make his own views known, which is fair enough given his undoubted knowledge, although sometimes one wishes he could have vented his proverbial spleen elsewhere. And a few of his opinions are pretty eccentric - 'Under The Red Sky' is tosh and that's the end of it! However Heylin writes with erudition, insight and humour and the results are both informative and entertaining. Although one or two others have also ventured into this territory, this is assuredly the most accurate and informed volume. It has also infuriated Dylan's office, which is all the better. A must for fans.


Allhallow's Eve
Allhallow's Eve
by Richard Laymon
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.19

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not so great, 25 Sept. 2005
This review is from: Allhallow's Eve (Paperback)
I'm pretty familiar with Stephen King, Clive Barker and James Herbert, but this is the first Laymon I've checked out. In this case the emphasis is on lame: 'The Shining' it ain't. This is a meandering, superficial and unfocussed novel that wastes way too much time on the central cop character following up wild-goose chases and a bunch of annoying teenagers before suddenly ending in a ludicrous finale involving a bunch of monkey-suits. I've heard good things about some of Laymon's other books, so I'll pursue a few of them. Hopefully I just got off on the wrong foot here.


Let's All Kill Constance
Let's All Kill Constance
by Ray Bradbury
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Old Master In Fine Form, 25 Sept. 2005
This is the third in Bradbury's wonderfully eccentric trilogy of detective novels, which began with 1984's 'Death Is A Lonely Business' and continued with 'A Graveyard For Lunatics' back in 1990. Whereas the second book was for me a bit of a let-down, lacking the rich atmosphere of the first, this new volume is a delight. Shorter and far pacier than either previous book, it kicks off with a dramatic encounter on a stormy night and races on for two hundred and fifty hugely entertaining pages. Our unnamed author (Bradbury, obviously) teams up with his pal, the irascible Detective Crumley, to investigate the disappearance of silent film-star Constance Rattigan, who has received two Death Books filled with the names of the deceased and soon-to-be-deceased...but death keeps beating them to the punch.
Perhaps sensing that the second book lacked pace and drifted, Bradbury dives straight in here and doesn't let up. All three books basically forego much in the way of plot, emphasising quirky character detail instead. This new book is no exception, except that Bradbury has really come up trumps here. Age eighty three, he really has produced his best dialogue - the characters leap into three dimensions and sparkle with wit and humour. Indeed there is a gleeful self-consciousness in the writing that comes through time and again, right from the opening 'It was a dark and stormy night - is that one way to catch your reader?' When a couple of characters from the other books suddenly turn up in unlikely and somewhat surreal fashion, it only confirms Bradbury's knowing camaraderie.
Great characters, memorable set-pieces, Grade-A dialogue and Bradbury's fastest pacing since 'Fahrenheit 451' - the Master marches on. I only hope he produces another one!


Gathering the Bones
Gathering the Bones
by Ramsey Campbell
Edition: Paperback

4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars a mixed bag, 1 July 2005
This review is from: Gathering the Bones (Paperback)
I bought this lengthy collection with high expectations. Thirty five modern horror stories are herein collected, the theme being that they stem from the three editors' home countries - the UK, USA and Australia. The authors range from established professionals to new arrivals on the publishing scene; consequently the volume partially sets out to showcase new talent, always an admirable ambition.They're brought together beneath a suitably spooky cover - actually some human skulls tucked away in a display case. As with many such compilations, however, the results are highly uneven. Perhaps a dozen or so of these tales are absolutely first rate (the best is probably the genuinely disturbing 'Bedfordshire' by Peter Crowther) and some of the more interesting are undoubtedly those written by women, who generally approach horror from a more thoughtful and consequently more frightening angle. A further dozen are worthwhile and a final group is frankly pretty forgettable.
In my opinion this volume would have benefited from a little more judicious editing; whittling it down to around twenty stories and cutting out the obvious deadwood would have done much to improve it. As it is, there are definite high spots but this particular ghost train is a bumpy ride.


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