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Headhunter "g-zero" (London, United Kingdom)

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The Social Animal: A Story of How Success Happens
The Social Animal: A Story of How Success Happens
by David Brooks
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.29

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting science book, a very poor novel, 16 Feb. 2012
It's a strange thing, this book. The author has copious amounts of very interesting research to share with us on many aspects of human development and interaction, but for some reason chooses the jarring method of shoehorning those facts into a novel. The science parts of the book are fascinating, clearly written, and thought-provoking, but sometimes these are then let down by the perfunctory attempts at creating a narrative in order to convey them. It's not necessary and reminds me of when bad thriller writers are desperate to share their research with is on the minutiae of everything ("Brad removed the Austrian made Glock from the glove compartment, thinking of how far the pistol had come from the town of its manufacture 15 kilometres north east of Vienna" etc).

Books like 59 Seconds, Freakonomics and The Survivors Club show that you don't need to hide science in fiction to get your point across. So it's five stars for the facts, reduced to four by the format.


Watermelons: How Environmentalists are Killing the Planet, Destroying the Economy and Stealing Your Children's Future
Watermelons: How Environmentalists are Killing the Planet, Destroying the Economy and Stealing Your Children's Future
by James Delingpole
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.99

42 of 62 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exposing widespread myths and deliberate frauds, 15 Feb. 2012
It seems everyone is banging on about manmade climate change these days (the scientific theory formerly known as Global Warming). Well, whether you are a realist or Warmist you must read this book.

Is our climate is changing? Yes. And it always has. But the real question is are humans exacerbating it and if not why are poeple promoting the anthropomorphic theory? Cui bono?

There will be those who moan and gripe that the author is not a scientist, which is true, but his copious footnotes show he roots his work in scientific research. As such his argument labelling Warmist Theory as "the fastest growing religion of the modern age" is hard to refute.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 18, 2012 3:24 PM GMT


Guilty: Liberal "Victims" and Their Assault on America
Guilty: Liberal "Victims" and Their Assault on America
by Ann Coulter
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £18.15

21 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Here she goes again!, 7 Jan. 2009
Nobody can say you don't know what you're going to get with an Ann Coulter book, though this is an interesting one because it is being published in the dying days of Bush's administration. The last book was dissapointing, it was merely a collection of quotes taken out of context from her books, columns and speeches, a lazy job which might put people off buying this one.

Well don't let it. I've read an advance copy of this from a colleague in America and she's back to her best. Of course, if you're a lily-livered type who can't bear to hear criticism of Obama and his Democrats this isn't for you.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 24, 2009 3:18 PM BST


Boris V. Ken: How Boris Johnson Won London
Boris V. Ken: How Boris Johnson Won London
by Giles Edwards
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent narrative history of Boris beating the incumbent, 10 Sept. 2008
This book is a very quick read and doesn't break much new ground for anyone who took more than a passing interest in the 2008 London Mayoral Election. It is, however, the first book to bring the whole story into one volume and in that sense is pretty exhaustive yet entertainingly written (Isaby's gossip column skills help on this front). Perhaps another book will be written with more analysis of events or in depth accounts of one or other campaign, but for now this is a pretty definitve history lf the election.


Cameron on Cameron: Conversations with Dylan Jones
Cameron on Cameron: Conversations with Dylan Jones
by David Cameron
Edition: Hardcover

5 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Much needed light shone on the Cameron enigma, 10 Sept. 2008
Up until now all we have seen of David Cameron has been through the filter of the party's publicists and their attempts to 'decontaminate' the Tory brand. This is the first opportunity for real in depth analysis of the man who would like to succeed Gordon Brown. It is relatively policy light (that's what manifestos are for and if you print that now with an election still likely to be over a year away you open yourself to being wedded to out of date dogma or having you good ideas pinched) but gives a fascinating account of his motivations and character. If only someone had done this with Gordon Brown before he took power!


Mike's Election Guide 2008
Mike's Election Guide 2008
by Michael Moore
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Poor attempt at election season cash in, 21 Aug. 2008
I've no problem with a well-targetted cash in. It's American Presidential Election season so why not try to link your product to that and see if it boosts sales? So far so good. A topically funny guide to current affairs is no bad thing. This, on the other hand, is a very bad thing. A lightweight and hastily written mish-mash of rants and lame humour, this is a waste of your money. If you want to learn something about American politics then read P.J. O'Rourke's "Parliament of Whores" and see how the grown-ups do it.


Term Limits: A Novel
Term Limits: A Novel
by Vince Flynn
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An American Frederick Forsyth, 18 Feb. 2006
This review is from: Term Limits: A Novel (Paperback)
I loved this book which I picked up on a trip to Washington DC a few years back. I've since read all of Flynn's novels and if you enjoy Frederick Forsyth's work (especially the likes of "The Fourth Protocol" and "Fist of God") then I'm sure you'll take to them as readily as I did. I guess that devotees of The Guardian will not enjoy his brand of political thriller but then who cares, he sells plenty without their help!


Playing Hard Ball: County Cricket and Big League Baseball: A Kent County Cricketer's Journey into Big League Baseball
Playing Hard Ball: County Cricket and Big League Baseball: A Kent County Cricketer's Journey into Big League Baseball
by E.T. Smith
Edition: Hardcover

3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best introduction to baseball for an Englishman, 7 Nov. 2002
First off I must declare a personal interest in this book. Ed Smith's father taught me English at A-level (a B grade, but I don't hold it against him) and Ed himself was a couple of years below me at school. Nevertheless I assure you this book is well worth the read, even from an impartial point of view.
I read it before a recent trip to California which happily coincided with the 2002 World Series - a rare all-Californian affair. Ed's descriptions of being in a World Series team's hometown during the event are very accurate (although sadly I never got to attend a Giants home game I did watch them with some fiercely partisan Giants supporters), not least in conveying quite what baseball means to Americans. Unlike one of the other reviewers I think Ed captured the human ties of the Special Relationship post-September 11 very well - the most evocative moment being when he tells of how the Star Spangled Banner had an unexpectedly emotional impact on him. The book is not just about cricket and baseball, early on Ed admits he bought into European anti-Americanism but as he spends more time understanding Americans through their national game he realises the error of his youthful ways!
Ed manages to bring baseball to life for those of us brought up believing cricket is a man's game whereas baseball is just glorified rounders. By drawing the many parallels between the two national games he achieves this in a way that makes it more accessible to an Englishman.


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