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Morten Lintrup "morlin" (Frederikssund, Denmark)
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Cryptography (Science of Secret Writing)
Cryptography (Science of Secret Writing)
by Laurence D. Smith
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.86

2.0 out of 5 stars Obsolete, 30 Jan 2014
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Not a bad book per se - but be warned it is an unaltered reprint of a 1943 edition! - Thus there is nothing about modern codes and computing. I think it is an obsolete curiosity today and rate it accordingly.


Professional Access 2013 Programming
Professional Access 2013 Programming
by Teresa Hennig
Edition: Paperback
Price: 29.59

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great book focused on Access 2013 webapps, 29 Jan 2014
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Access webapps - there are scores of books on Access programming (some including a section about webapps). But there is none devoted to the new 2013 flavour of Access webapps. - Correction: As of the time of my writing, there is this book, and none other to my knowledge. Why it does not say so in bold letters on the cover defeats me. I think it is an error of design, but if I am right in that respect, then it is an error that suits me fine.
Access webapps is an awesome concept: To combine the versatility, individuality and decentrality of Access presentation+I/O on the one hand, and the central storage and safe-handling of data by SQL Server on the other hand is simply a concept that rocks. There are still limitations to the implementation by Microsoft, but the principle is super sound. - It is easy and intuitive to get started. You can go a long way by that, but you do get to a point where there are clearly more possibilities, but it becomes a challenge to put the pieces together correctly. Internet resources are still scarce. And now there is this book.
I've only had the books for a few days by now and have only performed selected readings. Still, I have found what I looked for, presented in an easy and logical manner - and without all the inconsistencies too often found in the first and early editions of IT books written on the basis of pre-release editions of the software concerned. Thumbs up, and five stars from me.
(For the record: Final 250 pages, 30% of the book, is about traditional client-server design and development. I have no opinion about that part, but suspect it must be anything but comprehensive.)


Exodus: Immigration and Multiculturalism in the 21st Century
Exodus: Immigration and Multiculturalism in the 21st Century
by Paul Collier
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 13.60

12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An original and solidly reasoned approach, 25 Oct 2013
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An original and solidly reasoned approach to an intractable problem. Having read Bottom Billion and Plundered Planet, my expactations were high, and I was not disappointed. Conceivably the best and most important social sciences book to appear in 2013. Date-of-Issue coincided with my first ever visit to the southern hemisphere. So, it became my first iBook and it was a great inflight read. Before returning home today, I also ordered a hardcover copy, which I am eagerly awaiting to reread and be better able to add my own notes within, as I am used to.

The main merit of the book is that it presents a coherent framework in a fairly simple and accessible manner of an issue where science is usually at least as prejudiced or schewed as politics. While tracing fundamentals of immigration policy issues back to fundamental economic principles, the author still acknowledges that migration should not be taken primarily as an economic issue. In broadening the view to include ethics, the author also backtrace to basic principles instead of just the usual and lazy approach of confusing ethics with current legal interpretations of UN or EU Human Rights declarations in dogmatic form. That leads to some pretty surprising results, convincingly argued, e.g. about host countries' right (even responsibility, perhaps), to halt diaspora chain migration as we know it today.

That being said, while the presented framework is coherent, it is by no means complete - it raises a lot of unanswered questions along the way - and it makes no claims to the contrary. Only, one must hope it will make the basis for such discussion much better informed and constructive than is usual at present - if only prejudiced experts and politicians will bother to read the book and internalize the solid theories and observations presented.

For me the main limitations and loose ends are :
- the author appears to me overly optimistic about "progress", history as a linear development where enlightenment inevitably prevails
- repeated statements that Australia is underpopulated are puzzling to me, considering what I have read about ecology and shortage of water there. (No argument is given, but good references, so it is just for me to look it up!) Still, it is also recognized and solidly argued that any country, Australia included, is morally entitled to be largely selective of immigrants and should not be given to accept desperados and tricksters in leaky boats. Great credits for that.
- likewise it is stated flatly, that e.g. Bangladesh is overpopulated. I can only agree with that, and believe there are several more, perhaps less obvious such examples. However, the book attempts no discussion of what is the appropriate response (realistic and morally defensible) of "the outside world" to a country already overpopulated by people in denial of the situation - and intent on producing yet more people.


SQL Server MVP Deep Dives, Volume 2
SQL Server MVP Deep Dives, Volume 2
by Kalen Delaney
Edition: Paperback
Price: 32.19

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The difficult sequel..., 26 Jan 2012
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Not every success needs a sequel. Compared to the excellent vol. 1 there are several problems with this vol. 2. It is much more fragmented with many more contributors, perhaps all flocking to become part of a success. In other words, vol. 1 had longer articles with all the space needed and wanted by the author to deal with a given subject. The typical vol. 2 article is longer than a "mere" useful tip, but too short to really go anywhere - in other words: empty calories, idling... - This is all not to say the book is worthless, far from it , here and there it definitely has it highs as well the (too many) lows - hence two stars after all.


The Day Michael Collins Was Shot
The Day Michael Collins Was Shot
by Meda Ryan
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.28

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Extremely well researched and well written, 24 Jan 2012
I found the book while on vacation in Ireland but only got to read it a while after and was caught as soon as I picked it up again. There is not much action - even at the point of the fatal event - but one cannot but admire how well the book is researched and how clearly and vividly the facts are presented. It is probably best to have seen and liked the film about Michael Collins, starring Liam Neeson, before reading.


Joyita: Solving the Mystery
Joyita: Solving the Mystery
by David G. Wright
Edition: Paperback
Price: 23.34

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A small gem of a book, 24 Jan 2012
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Not much of a book - yet all it takes to present a gripping story and a mundane but all the more convincing explanation of events, which have puzzled investigators and authors in the past. In the best sense of things, the author is not primarily a writer but someone with a picture to paint in words and a true story to tell from a time and a place of which very little is heard - and the book is all the better for it.


The Plundered Planet: How to Reconcile Prosperity With Nature
The Plundered Planet: How to Reconcile Prosperity With Nature
by Paul Collier
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.99

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Top marks for originality, 24 Jan 2012
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A very original and very well written book. Incredible how a subject treated so often in writing can be given a whole new angle. The best way to help the poorest countries is most likely not the various popular and ubiquitious types of human development projects but perhaps rather e.g. prospecting aid which - unfortunately - has little public appeal and goes up against vested interests of multinational mining conglomerates.
Importantly, also a simple and convincing description of economic theory dealing with socalled "global commons" such as international fisheries and carbon emissions. Yet also a problem in that category: Why not admit that the same theory applies equally well to child birth and population growth? Not even a passing mention. I suspect the author consider the subject too controversial and rather than writing some gobbledygook he knows is false, he choose to ignore it.


Peoplequake: Mass Migration, Ageing Nations and the Coming Population Crash
Peoplequake: Mass Migration, Ageing Nations and the Coming Population Crash
by Fred Pearce
Edition: Paperback
Price: 7.75

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Simplistic Sensation Mongering, 23 Nov 2010
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Well, Fred Pearce can write. No doubt about that. And write fast, I suppose, since this book appears very simplistic. Initially the Irish potato famine is described to set the scene. Pearce tells the story he likes to tell, but please take the trouble to read J S Donnelly (The Great Irish Potato Famine) for the real, balanced story! Pearce's presentation of concepts like biofuel and demographic transition are likewise simplistic and skewed. Downright funny is his dismissal of of Meadows and al., Limits to Growth from a. 1970: The[ir] main model run showed business continuing as usual till about 2010. After that, 'as resource prices rise and mines are depleted, more and more capital must be used for obtaining resources, leaving less to be invested for [...]'. Well, might not Peak Oil fit that prediction remarkably well? No reflection on that by Fred Pearce! - More scary is that Pearce takes for granted that the rest of the world should just give way and surrender the world to the overly fecund. Sure, a demographic collapse in a country with 8 to 12-fold population increase within just a few generations could be Hell on Earth - but need it really be the end of the world? Not living in such a country myself, I could easily see the world live through such events and emerge in better shape eventually. - For a more balanced and not so sensational, but still popular account of modern world demograhics, read 'More' by Robert Engelman instead.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 5, 2011 11:15 AM GMT


Expert Cube Development with Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Analysis Services
Expert Cube Development with Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Analysis Services
by Chris Webb
Edition: Paperback
Price: 30.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No. 2 SSAS Book, 12 Aug 2010
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I - almost - completely agree with the comprehensive review by Rainardi. This is a top SSAS book, and the two other top three books are those by Teo Lachev (SSAS 2005) and by Irina, Edward & Alexander (SSAS 2008). To be a little more precise, however, this should only by your "No. 2 SSAS Book". You need one of the others first, depending on which SSAS version you are using. That'll give you a comprehensive overview, and then this book has the potential to make you a full-blown professional. It should not be your first book, though, since the level required is (in many parts) quite sophisticated, and since coverage is incomplete and "biased" by experience of what has the most practical importance.


Mis-Measuring Our Lives
Mis-Measuring Our Lives
by Joseph E. Stiglitz
Edition: Paperback
Price: 10.37

4 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Loss of Connection, 13 July 2010
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"The Commission regards its report as opening a discussion rather than closing it. The report hints as issues that ought to be addressed in the context of more comprehensive research efforts". Thus reads the opening statement of the last section of the Executive Summary. - Is it just me, or isn't it just a bit tame - given the grand opportunity presented to the authors by pres. Sarkozy?
This is one of those rare occasions where a lengthy preface signed by a politician - French pres. Sarkozy of all persons! - is actually the most engaging and interesting part of a book - and that preface is really worth reading! - It may be unfair to the leaders of the Commission, not knowing what their working conditions has been: Nevertheless, I am left with the impression that this is yet another occasion where politics and science fail to connect, in this case uncharacteristically mainly due to science being wholly unprepared for a sudden political opening. A trifle sad, at least. Much as I would love to like the book, I cannot rate it any higher than three stars.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 13, 2011 10:39 PM BST


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