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Marigold

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Dotter of Her Father's Eyes
Dotter of Her Father's Eyes
by Bryan Talbot
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £11.29

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lovely book, 4 April 2013
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Read this book in one sitting and thoroughly enjoyed it. The story is moving and subtle and has interesting shifts in time. The drawings are clear and warm. Highly recommended - as a story about Joyce and his children and as a parallel story about the author. Lovely piece of work.


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lovely straight forwardly written book, 4 April 2013
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Really recommend this book. Erudite without being pompous, straight forwardly, warmly written. A little gem and full of interesting information.


Set of 3 Ribbed Microfibre Tea Towels Assorted Colours Pink Blue Green
Set of 3 Ribbed Microfibre Tea Towels Assorted Colours Pink Blue Green
Offered by One Click Wonder
Price: £5.32

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars OK Teatowels, 4 April 2013
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They seem to be OK but I got them for presents for people and when they arrived they were a bit marked - stuff that would rub off and not anything I would mind for myself - but as they were presents, I wasn't too pleased about it.


The Quest for Meaning: Developing a Philosophy of Pluralism
The Quest for Meaning: Developing a Philosophy of Pluralism
by Tariq Ramadan
Edition: Paperback

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Ramadan and pluralism, 30 Sept. 2010
If you enjoy Ramadan's thinking, then this is another excellent book in which he develops his theory of pluralism. Easy and a pleasure to read. I found that I wanted to dip into it at random rather than to work my way through from beginning to end and that this was a rewarding way to read the book. It is very broad-ranging, and Ramadan tackles diverse approaches to his subject. Inevitably there are parts of his argument I don't agree with, but I found this added to the richness of the book as a whole. Ramadan takes his mission very seriously and sometimes the language gets a little flowery and ponderous. But I think the most impressive - and moving - element is his attempt to combine erudition and politics with a sense of poetry and the divine.


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