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Bruce Moody (South Carolina, USA)
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Into That Silent Sea: Trailblazers of the Space Era, 1961-1965 (Outward Odyssey: a People's History of Spaceflight)
Into That Silent Sea: Trailblazers of the Space Era, 1961-1965 (Outward Odyssey: a People's History of Spaceflight)
by Francis French
Edition: Hardcover

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating stories about those who flew into that "silent sea" of space!, 18 Oct 2007
A fantastic job, not only in bringing to the fore many otherwise never to be enjoyed stories, but also managing to maintain a keen, intrinsic sense of "wonderment" about the human experience in space. I haven't seen an example of writing like this since Andy Chaikin's "A Man On The Moon" book. I especially enjoyed the present-day comments shared by those who were there when those historical events happened. The cosmonaut chapters were beautifully done as well! This book is just a joy to read!


In the Shadow of the Moon: A Challenging Journey to Tranquility, 1965-1969 (Outward Odyssey: A People's History of Spaceflight)
In the Shadow of the Moon: A Challenging Journey to Tranquility, 1965-1969 (Outward Odyssey: A People's History of Spaceflight)
by Walter Cunningham
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 18.99

26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Outstanding Read!!, 18 Oct 2007
I'm on the last few pages of the book and I must say I hate to see it end!

In particular, I thought the Gemini section was brilliant! Along with quite a few missing links from otherwise well-documented tales, what I really enjoyed were the unique and exclusive comments from some of the astronauts who flew the missions, especially those of Stafford and Cernan. This not only lends credibility to the book, but it also brings the reader to the "inside" of the stories.

I've always felt that Donn Eisele was sort of The Invisible Man on Apollo 7 because so little has been written about him. But now, I have a much more complete picture of his personality, his domestic challenges, his professional aptitude, etc. Donn's a complete member of the crew in my mind now! I thought Walt Cunningham's comments were extremely helpful by providing the reader with an insider's view of key events surrounding the Apollo 7 mission.

This book really goes a long way in quenching the thirst for those of us who are "space literate", but I can see where it would fun to read and informative for those who wouldn't know Neil Armstrong from Lance Armstrong.

Lastly, the authors never let us forget that there were real human beings flying in those spacecraft; not robots programed to perform their tasks until their batteries died. To me, that is probably one of the key things that makes this book special.


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