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Adam Frankenberg "Kol adam" (Manchester UK)
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Old Testament Parsing Guide
Old Testament Parsing Guide
by Todd S Beall
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Useful, 8 April 2011
This book is a great refereence resource for the study of the Hebrew Text of the Hebrew Bible (here called the Old Testament) it contains a list of all the verbs in the Bilble listed by book, chapter and verse. And then gives a brake down of whch Binyan they belong to (a Binyan is a family of Hebrew verbs so Kal is passive and Hitpael is reflexive-if you don't know what a Binyan is then this book probably wont be of interest to you or needed) the form of the verb (past or future) as well as its temporal meaning, its root and number and gender. In short anything that you could want to know about it.
I found it very useful while studying Biblical Hebrew and Bible and it is one of those books that i wish i had brought with me on my year studying abroad.
I reall recommend this book if you are studying or plan to study Biblical Hebew or Hebrew Bible. It is very useful in both helping gain an understanding of the text and in self-study/cheeking assigned work from classes.


Lonely Man of Faith
Lonely Man of Faith
by Joseph B. Soloveitchik
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A philosophical and theological consideration of solitude, 2 April 2011
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This review is from: Lonely Man of Faith (Paperback)
Rav Soloveitchik, was among the leading halakhic figures of the last century. In addition to his work in this field he was also an improtant philosophic thinker. He had not only been trained in the classical texts of Judaism but also philosophy in Berlin.
This book is based a seris of lectures given at Yeshiva University. Perhaps because this book is based on a sersis of public lectures it is a very accessable. Dispite the fact that it is higly accessable it is a profound work. Rav Soloveitchik uses the first two chapters of Genesis (which tell two similar but different accounts of the creation of the world and of Adam). Rav Soloveitchik encourprates insighties from philosophy from the likes of kant and Kierkegaard as well as Pyscology.

The basic argument of the book is that there are two Adams and therefore two types of characteristics within each of us (both commanded by God and in that sense both nature and necessary) one the out going individualistic Adam of Genesis One who if he does construct communities does so in a utilitrian way and the other Lonely (if not alone) Adam of Genesis two, who needs to construct a (faith)-community in order to draw closer to God. It is this lonely Man of Faith who gives the book its name.

Probably this book will be of most interest to people with some philosophical background and an interest in Judaism. However, it is accessable to almost any reader and i think that anyone will find much of interest in it.

The Lonely Man of Faith was first published in the magazine Tradition in 1965, however it is still as revelent to a postmodernist society as it was to the morderist one it was written for. It is short book, some ten shortish chapters nevertheless it is a profound work that is worth reading and then re-reading.


The Finkler Question
The Finkler Question
by Howard Jacobson
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £18.99

6 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars juvenile, 11 Feb. 2011
This review is from: The Finkler Question (Hardcover)
I have rarely wished that I could give a book a zero star rating until now. There is really no way to say how poor this work is. It does not even manage to transcend itself and become great despite of its awfulness. This is because it is not so much awful as it is awfully mundane.

The story focuses on and around and on the lives of three men. Julian Treslove, Samuel (Sam Finkler) who are old school Friends and their former teacher Libor Sevcik. Sam and Libor are Jewish whereas Julian, the books hero or anti-hero is not.

Jacobson has attempted to robe his narrative in the question of Jewish identity in contemporary Britain as well as Zionism and Anti-Zionism.

I think that the Finkler question may have been meant to be a satire on Anglo-Judaism and on the whole debate on Zionism and Anti-Zionism in leftwing British life. Not content with attempting all that he also tries to satirise Antisemitism. The only problem with this is that the book simple isn't that funny. There are moments and scenes when the use of a lighter touch could have been funny.

However they are so over written that they have lost any life that they might have had.

In addition the `Finkler question' fails as a novel. The three main characters are poorly drawn, never really escaping beyond the page forever confined as two-dimensional.

The secondary characters in the novel are even more thinly drawn (this problem seems especially acute in the case of female characters). This makes it very hard to care about the angst of the central protagonists or what they think or feel about any of the matters that confront them.

I know that one of the concerns of this book are stereotypes however, this does not prevent Jacobson from drawing heavily on the entire range of standard stereotypes of both Jews and non-Jews.

I am living abroad at the moment but even here I couldn't help but notice how much fuss was being coursed by this work, so I bought a copy to see what all the fuss was about. I can see that the way Jacobson has grabbed his work in issues such as Holocaust denial and Zionism anti-Zionism could be seen as offensive but this book is really too poor to course me much offence.

It is best to describe the whole tone and nature of this book as juvenile, or maybe adolescent is a more fitting term, in attempting to be a biting satire and a political critic (albeit a comedic one) all at the same time.


As a Driven Leaf
As a Driven Leaf
by Chaim Potok
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The world of the Talmud jumps off the page, 1 Dec. 2010
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This review is from: As a Driven Leaf (Paperback)
In this novel Milton Steinberg brings the world of the Talmudic sages and the sages themselves to life. I frist read this book around the time of my Bar Mitzvah. (It was one of my presents). It focuses on the life of Elisha ben Abuyah know in the tradition as Acher (The Other). As well as such great rabbis as Akivah and Meir and others. It is set around, or just before the time of Mishnah and in the period of the Bar Kockba revolt. So the book is filled with political intrigue. But it is so much more than a historical novel. I think that it is the fact that i read this book that frist started my interest in Talmud. It is a fun and exciting novel to read, as well as being litereature and not simply fiction. It is also highly informative but manges to wear its scholarship lightly.


The Five: A Novel of Jewish Life in Turn-of-the-century Odessa
The Five: A Novel of Jewish Life in Turn-of-the-century Odessa
by Vladimir Jabotinsky
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars springtime in Odessa, 12 Nov. 2010
Vladimer Jabotinsky is probably best known as the leader of the Revisionist Zionists (non-Soicalists). But he was also a noted public speaker and was fluent in serval languages. The Five is a Russian novel centering on the life of one Jewish family in Odessa in the early part of the nineteeth century. It is beautifuly written and has been rendured in graceful English by Michael R., Katz. The chapters are relativly short as is the novel itself (it did not take me very many sittings to complet it). But for the space of time that I was reading i felt myself drawn into a strange and exciting world. And now saddly one that is lost forever. I found the five main characters the childern of the family at the centre of the novel. And for whom the novel is named, at turns funny and intriging, annoying and familer. However it was the portrait that Jabotinsky draws of the city of Odessa itself that is the most enticing. Just as there are novels whose reallt main centre of attention is Dublin, London, Rome, or New York, in the Five it is Odessa that sands out most prominantly.


In the Beginning
In the Beginning
by Chaim Potok
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.99

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars complex and profound., 10 Nov. 2010
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This review is from: In the Beginning (Paperback)
This is one of Potok's more complex works. Although some of the troops of the book will be familier to those who have read other Potok Novels (The Chosen, the Promise, the Book of Lights, e.c.t.,) they are more subtle in this work than others. The story focuses on the growing up off David Lurie, in a New York Jewish family before and during the great depression. As with many of Potoks work much of the action takes place in a Jewish religious framework (a Jewish School and yeshivah) and another familer Potokian theme is that of what to when confronted with a truth that may challenge ones life-style or belief. The style of the book is more fragmented than some of Potoks other works and is written from the prespective of a man (possible an old man) looking back on his life and remembering what happened. Rather than as a 'real time' novel. I greatly enjoyed this novel. It is, perhaps, not as easy as the Promise. But it is worth the effort. Maybe not the best Potok novel to start with but it will be welcomed by any Potok fans, or indeed others who will give it the time it deserves.


The Double Life Of Veronique [DVD]
The Double Life Of Veronique [DVD]
Dvd ~ Aleksander Bardini
Price: £6.25

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Extraordinary and imbued with longing, 6 Nov. 2010
I should start with a confession. This is my favorite film and has been since I first saw it many years ago.

*possible soiler alter*

It tells the story of two young women who are in some mystious way twins although born to separate parnets. One in Poland and one in France. When one of them feels that something is wrong. She goes on what can only be called a quest.

Music is central to film and the sound track is praticually beautiful. As in all of Kieslowski's films the cinematography is sublime. Producing images that will really stay in the mind. And in a postive way.

This is gem of a film.


Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia
Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia
by Rudolf Kittel
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £57.36

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Bible of Biblical scholarship, 18 Oct. 2010
This is the standard academic work and really is essential for anyone who is serious about the 'critical/academic' study of the Bible. After short but very useful introduction the text itself is printed in clear Hebrew (It is of course the standard Masortetic text) the really improtance of the BHS is the footnotes which give variant readings in other sourses, so for example in Hebrew manuscripts or in the Valugate/Septuagint. Along the outer margins there are Minor Masortic notes. (This are largely copiests notes) and inform the reader for example how many times a certain word is used. (I became very intresested in Masortic notes). The text of the BHS is largely that of the Leningrad codex (which is the oldest complet text of the Hebrew Bible)


Sanatorium Under the Sign of the Hourglass (Writers from the Other Europe)
Sanatorium Under the Sign of the Hourglass (Writers from the Other Europe)
by Bruno Schulz
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars simply prefect., 16 Oct. 2010
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Bruno Schulz is oftern described as being like Kaffka, there is something in this suggestion and indeed he translated Kaffka. The Sanatorium under the sign of the hourglass is one of two collections of short shories, the other is called 'the street of crocodilies' in Engilsh or sometimes as the Cinamon shops. Although his work is limited in volume (he was murdered during the holocaust. His collection of short shories is little short of prefection. Combining a view of the world form a childlike prespective and a discomforting not-quite-rightness that is so remanistant of his age and of Krakka. Schulz was also a graffic artist and the pen and ink illistrations add an extra dimention to what is already a beautiful and deeply complex work. The short stories are interconecting and together form a lose narrative about the life of boy and his family (who run a small shop). The Sanatorium under the sign of the hourglass would be one of the Ten books that I would take with me into exile if I were ever forced to limit myself to just ten titles. I cannot recommend it enough. At times it is a complex read, and it will stand upto multiple re-readings. I now that i have not really said what the stories are about and in someways that is unimportant as the strong elements of surrealism and magical realism lift the work beyond the topics of the stories themselves. (It is also the kind of book which rewards its readers with single lines so prefect that they take you gasp...at least it did for me).


501 Hebrew Verbs: Fully Conjugated in All the Tenses in a New Easy-to-follow Format Alphabetically Arranged by Root (501 Verbs)
501 Hebrew Verbs: Fully Conjugated in All the Tenses in a New Easy-to-follow Format Alphabetically Arranged by Root (501 Verbs)
by S. Bolozky
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Blessing and a Godsend, 13 Oct. 2010
This book is a blessing and a salavation. As its name suggests it is a list of 501 Hebrew verbs that are fully conjugared. In Hebrew verbs are divided into a number of patterns (binyanim) and because it is a numbered and gendered language the form of a verb will be different dependon tense, number and gender. As long as you know the shoresh (the root letters from which the verb is constructed) you can look it up in the index at the back of the book and then find the particular form of the verb that you need. Its helpfullness in writting in Modern Hebrew is beyond measure. It is also useful in the study of classical Hebrew as well


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