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Rosie "rosiemee" (Scotland)

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Wallace & Gromit and the Lost Slipper
Wallace & Gromit and the Lost Slipper
by Tristan Davies
Edition: Hardcover

4.0 out of 5 stars More pleasure from the Yorkshire Two, 20 April 2011
If you like the Wallace and Gromit films then you'll love this book. Nick Newman's illustrations are a joy to behold - they are witty and colourful, revealing something new each time you look at them. The text by Tristan Davies is subtly funny and never underestimates the intelligence of his audience e.g. "Jaw-jaw is just as good as saw-saw" (Spot the Churchillian reference...)

Wallace and Gromit: The Lost Slipper (Wallace & Gromit)


Mighty Subjects: The Dunbar Earls in Scotland 1072- 1289
Mighty Subjects: The Dunbar Earls in Scotland 1072- 1289
by Elas Hamilton
Edition: Paperback
Price: £25.00

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Light in the Darkness, 12 Aug. 2010
This marvellous book throws a lot of light into a hitherto rather dark corner of Scottish history. Although I am passonately interested in Scottish history, the Dunbar Earls had rather escaped my notice in the melee which is Scottish medieval history. Gospatric and his descendants are fascinating characters and Elsa Hamilton unfolds their story in an interesting yet disciplined narrative.


Celtic Knots With & Beyond J Romilly Allen
Celtic Knots With & Beyond J Romilly Allen

5.0 out of 5 stars Celtic Knots, 12 Aug. 2010
This large, well-illustrated paperback is a marvellous resource for anybody interested in that most mysterious of all Celtic symbols - the knot. Knots appear on stones throughout the Celtic countries of Western Europe. It used to be thought that the Celtic knot was just a poor imitation of Roman latticework. Brett Yazee's reconsideration of the work done by Romily Allen in the late 19th century demonstrates convincingly that the Celtic artists who inscribed these interlaces in stone were not mere copyists but considerable artists in their own right. These Celts were "past masters of form and composition".
The book is beautifully produced and very well illustrated in black and white. It is a "must buy" for anybody interested in Celtic art and the Celtic world in general.
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Auld Scots Fare and Other Poems
Auld Scots Fare and Other Poems
by Peter Brown
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Modern Scottish Poetry, 10 May 2009
This is a collection of 31 poems written in modern Scots and English by Peter Brown. He covers the usual topics - Burns, Scottish food, bonnie lasses, Scotland the imagined country - in a charming but melancholic manner. The influence of Burns is obvious. Like Burns, his poems in Standard English are stiffer and less successful e.g. "Christmas Morn". The short poems in Scots are delightful - "A Sweetie" is delicious as is "The Fule o Atholbogie". This is a collection of poems to be read aloud and savoured - and returned to time and again.
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Chapman 59 : Including Special Feature on Kenneth White
Chapman 59 : Including Special Feature on Kenneth White
by Joy Hendry
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars A Pict in Roman Gaul, 11 Sept. 2008
This edition of "Chapman" contains an excellent collection of articles by and about Kenneth White who could be termed one of Scotland's greatest gifts to France.


Churches to Visit in Scotland
Churches to Visit in Scotland
by John R. Hume
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars The Church Visiting Companion, 19 Dec. 2007
This is a very good paperback to keep in your glove compartment if you are keen on Scottish churches - ancient and modern - and like to visit Christian churches of all denominations. The symbols are particularly useful - they tell you if you can expect a guide, a loo or a cup of tea - and there is a very brief potted history of the church and any outstanding architectural features. Charming little black and white sketches accompany many of the entries.


Scotland's Books: The Penguin History of Scottish Literature
Scotland's Books: The Penguin History of Scottish Literature
by Robert Crawford
Edition: Paperback
Price: £15.99

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More than just a History of Scot Lit, 18 Dec. 2007
Very often, the history of a country's literature is a dutiful, chronological trawl through a list of the usual suspects. This book is much, much more. Robert Crawford relates the literature to the history of Scotland. When you read this book you are also witnessing the making of Scotland as a country. Extracts are given(often in the original Latin or Gaelic)and then you can read the text for yourself. The effect is to make you want to read on.
Crawford's style is wonderfully engaging. Discusing Covenanting times in the 17th century, Crawford notes:
"Then as now, though, not everyone liked God."
On Burns, his observations are acute:
" He was happy to introduce himself in print as a local 'obscure, nameless Bard'. But he made sure his name was on the title page of his first book".
This is a book to be savoured, to be sipped like a good wine. It is a vintage which can only improve.


Wee Macgreegor
Wee Macgreegor
by J.J. Bell
Edition: Paperback

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Classic Glaswegian Novel, 6 Dec. 2007
This review is from: Wee Macgreegor (Paperback)
This novel tells the story of a wee Glaswegian boy in episodic form. The novel first started life as a series of newspaper sketches. The dialogue is rich and authentically Glaswegian of the period. It is set at the turn of the 20th century and we are introduced to a whole host of characters - Magreegor's father and mother, wee sister Jeannie and other relatives both nice and nasty.
There are visits to the Zoo, the church social and the annual trip Doon the Watter to a Clydeside resort.
A glossary is provided at the back of the book if the dialect occasionally becomes too much.
This is a book to be read, re-read, read aloud and savoured at length.


Catholicism For Dummies
Catholicism For Dummies
by Rev. John Triglio
Edition: Paperback

30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Catholicism with a Light Touch, 2 Nov. 2006
This is essentially an introduction to Catholicism for people who aren't Catholic. It covers all the main points of belief and gives a certain flavour of what being a Catholic in the 21st century is all about. Above all, it captures the humour of the Catholic world. The cartoons are worth the price of the book alone. If you have ever wondered what it is like being a Catholic, then this book is a great starting-point.


Ann and Peter in Scotland (Kennedys abroad series)
Ann and Peter in Scotland (Kennedys abroad series)
by Hazel Greenham
Edition: Unknown Binding

4.0 out of 5 stars Abroad in Scotland, 7 Nov. 2005
This is a lovely story for children which effortlessly combines Scottish history, mystery and adventure into a real Scotch broth of a book. This book - like the others in the series -was deliberately written as an adventure story rather than a tourist guide.


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