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Julie (London England)

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The Rose of Tibet
The Rose of Tibet
by Lionel Davidson
Edition: Paperback

5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great adventure story, 23 April 2003
This review is from: The Rose of Tibet (Paperback)
A great story, a great setting; you feel the author has been there and researched all the places himself. The first-person narrative Mr Davidson employs for the Prologue is a little tedious, but once past this scene-setting, the story crackles along. The characters are diverse and believeable, and once the Chinese invade Tibet the race is on to escape!
Engrossing commuter reading.


Kolymsky Heights
Kolymsky Heights
by Lionel Davidson
Edition: Paperback

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pacy page-turner, 23 April 2003
This review is from: Kolymsky Heights (Paperback)
WOW! Lionel Davidson's best book yet. Right from the first page you are drawn into the murky world of a secret Siberian laboratory, and what a hero! Johnny Porter is unique - tough, versatile, skilled and linguistically brilliant, the only man for the job. A dangerous job that demands a specialist. Move over James Bond - this guy can run rings around you!
Read it during a howling dark winter's night for full effect.


The Olive Season: Amour, a new life and olives too
The Olive Season: Amour, a new life and olives too
by Carol Drinkwater
Edition: Paperback

7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The show must go on ..., 10 April 2003
If there is one metaphor coming through the two books about Appassionata, it has to be renewal. The house, the land, the search for water, the olive trees, Carol's own faith in love and commitment, her hopes for a baby and dealing with the consequences of loss - all these are part of the cycle of life. I enjoyed reading The Olive Farm and The Olive Season, the mix of biography and snippets of botanical history, meeting the people helping on the farm, and members of her family. I identified with her loss of the baby having recently lost my own, recognising the psychological trauma and withdrawal.
However, the only real niggle I have is with accuracy and representation. Whilst I appreciate the need for privacy, could not the publisher at least provide a consistent image on the front covers of the two books? Obviously it's not even the same house, let alone Appassionata. Also, giving the reader some graphical representation of the locality (as Frances Mayes did in Under the Tuscan Sun) would be nice. And as Carol herself says she has "bent time", it is difficult to judge the number of years the story covers. Ah well, the privilege of the author I suppose. Still, an interesting read, and conveniently available at the airport!


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