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Doctor Who: Silhouette (12th Doctor novel)
Doctor Who: Silhouette (12th Doctor novel)
Price: £4.99

4.0 out of 5 stars A Fun Twelfth Doctor Adventure, 11 July 2015
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One of the first Twelfth Doctor novels, this book sees Peter Capaldi's Doctor and companion Clara head to Victorian London to investigate a mysterious power spike. Inevitably they meet up with the Paternoster Row gang, Madame Vastra, Jenny and Strax as they investigate a series of murders.

I always think a sci-fi story set in the Victorian era works rather well and this is another example. The story is mostly set around a Frost Fair and Carnival of Curiosities, a magical setting which is so perfect for Doctor Who. The villain is rather good, a properly despicable Victorian villain that you really dislike. Although there's no monsters as such there are some interesting characters with special abilities, all of which are fantastic creations, yet somehow not outrageous.

I felt at times that the character of the Twelfth Doctor wasn't particularly accurate, but I suspect the author had little to do on and managed a decent if not entirely successful attempt. Clara is good here which is nice to see although I did feel the Paternoster Row trio weren't needed here. In the TV show there's always been a strong reason for them being in the episode, that they affect the story in some way, but here it feels like the plot would have been pretty much identical without their presence. They are well characterised though and as usual Strax has some really funny moments.

The first set of novels for a new Doctor also suffer from the author only knowing the basics to what the new character is like and how the series will feel but actually Richards gives us a really enjoyable Victorian Doctor Who story.


Doctor Who: The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Time Traveller (Time Trips)
Doctor Who: The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Time Traveller (Time Trips)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Dying Third Doctor..., 11 July 2015
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As with many others in the Time Trips series, this sees a popular author, this time author of "Chocolat" Joanne Harris, write a Doctor Who story. This one features Jon Pertwee's Third Doctor and in terms of continuity is set right before the end of his last story, Planet of the Spiders.

The dying Doctor finds himself in the Village where life is idyllically simple. But when the Doctor meets the Queen he begins to realise this strange world masks a dark secret.

The idea for this is a good one, poignantly focusing on the Doctor dying. Whilst I felt Harris characterised the Third Doctor pretty well it didn't have much in common with his era. It felt like a New Who story which only used the Third Doctor as it was the only one that practically worked with the regeneration.

One of the best of the series and an excellent idea which is well executed. Harris did a decent job of doing a Doctor Who story.


Borrowed Power (Joe Ledger)
Borrowed Power (Joe Ledger)

4.0 out of 5 stars A Short Joe Ledger Story, 11 July 2015
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This short Joe Ledger story bridges the gap between Assassin's Code and Extinction Machine. It is set over two periods in the sewers of Paris.

In the first half we see a pre-DMS Mr. Church being the action hero as he discovers a threat and neutralises it. Then we see our friend Joe Ledger see the aftermath thirty years later and have to deal with a different threat.

Without revealing much, the story creates an interesting parallel between Church and Ledger which I suspect neither character really realises. Ledger also re-meets someone from the books so far. As always, it is set in the DMS sort-of-supernatural universe.

It's by no means essential reading but it was a nice extra and makes me look forward to reading Extinction Machine eventually.


Fahrenheit 451 (Flamingo Modern Classics)
Fahrenheit 451 (Flamingo Modern Classics)
Price: £4.99

5.0 out of 5 stars A Modern Classic, 11 July 2015
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I spent the first part of this book trying to work out what 451 degrees Fahrenheit actually is. As the book tells you, it is the temperature at which paper burns. Although there's a whole debate about that. Anyway, in a scale I understand it's apparently about 232 degrees Celsius. I feel better now. On with the review.

So yes, this is your classic dystopian novel about a miserable vision of the future. This miserable vision is one where no-one reads book and anyone that does is found out and firemen come along and burn the books (and sometimes the person too). Guy Montag is a fireman who loves burning books but suddenly has a change in heart. Cue drama.

The big problem with the book is the flowery style. It's not like your traditional book where you read it and understand what is happening straight away. It's packed full of metaphors and dream sequences and that makes it confusing and frustrating. It took quite a while for me to see past this but fortunately once the plot begins to move on, this frustration begins to wane.

It became clear to me that the concept behind this is actually better than pretty much any dystopian book every written. Usually it is based on a the masses suffering thanks to a nasty regime. Here however, the people have caused there own problems. Whilst the theme is book burning, the dystopian factor is that the people in this world don't have anything that stimulates thought, be that in book, films, TV shows or whatever. The firemen are barely needed because in this world people no longer read books and spend all their time watching unstimulating TV shows in their ultra hi-tech TV parlors. And that's the scary thought because it all sounds so familiar and our real world is terrifyingly close to being like the world in the book.

Oddly written, yes, but this book is based on a wonderful idea which really stimulates thought, something which ironically wouldn't happen in the world the book is set in.


Doctor Who - The Ark [DVD] [1966]
Doctor Who - The Ark [DVD] [1966]
Dvd ~ William Hartnell
Price: £6.00

4.0 out of 5 stars Better Than Expected, 11 July 2015
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I completely missed the fact that this was released on DVD and I suspect that is partly because the Doctor Who community is rather apathetic about the story. It’s not regarded as one of those really dreadful ones but its not liked all that much either.

I was therefore surprised to find I rather like it. There’s something about the Space Ark thing that I think always works really well, the idea of humans going to extraordinary and impossible lengths to survive. The fact the Ark looked so wonderful, especially with the animals in it, really helped the feeling.

Then there’s the really unusual plot line of using time travel to see the consequences of your actions. In 50 years that concept has only been used a few times and it is one that works really well.

William Hartnell, despite a few fluffed lines, is great in this story, being the friendly Doctor he was his latter stories. Peter Purves is really spectacular as Steven, especially in the court scene. He reminds me of the modern Doctors, almost David Tennant like in a way. This is Dodo’s first story after being introduced at the end of The Massacre and she is almost likeable here. Having watched Mel as the companion only recently, Dodo is great in comparison.

I think the thing that decides your enjoyment of this story is the Monoids. There’s no questioning that they look dreadful, certainly from the chin down. Above the rubber suit though is that solo eye and the Beatles haircut which I think looks rather good. Monoids are certainly a long way away from the worst looking Doctor Who monsters we have ever had.

I have been wondering since watching this about the whole virus thing, and why giving diseases to the locals has not been a problem the Doctor has had before or since. Maybe that’s why he kept sending the likes of Nyssa back the TARDIS, knowing she was full of pathogens.

Much better than expected!


A Meditation on Murder (An original Death in Paradise story)
A Meditation on Murder (An original Death in Paradise story)
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4.0 out of 5 stars An extra episode of the brilliant TV show Death in Paradise in book form, 11 July 2015
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An extra episode of the brilliant TV show Death in Paradise in book form. Featuring Ben Miller's character Richard Poole, this sees the Honore Police Force on the Caribbean island of Saint Marie investigate a murder at a spa. It takes place in a locked room and there's a confession from the murderer and four apparent witnesses. So why does Richard feel something is not right?

Like many episodes of Death in Paradise, this contains a great mystery. I was determined I would work it all out but failed miserably. It's typical that every suspect has a secret which might be related to the murder but as we are drip-fed information we seem to get no closer to the truth.

It's difficult for me to review this because there doesn't feel like there is much to say. It exactly matches the tone and feel of the TV series, by which I mean it's a light-hearted, Agatha Christie-style mystery. Perhaps the only different thing here is we get to see some of Richard's thoughts, something we obviously don't get in the TV show, and these are a good addition, although a little drawn out.

It was frustrating that the information on the station whiteboard was constantly repeated to us- it served no real purpose and in the kindle version was hard to read due to poor formatting. Why summarise all the information we learn during the book, a short one at that? It just wastes space and disrupts the flow of the book.

Everything you would expect from a book version of Death in Paradise. A great light-hearted mystery.


Broadchurch: The End Is Where It Begins (Story 1): A Series Two Original Short Story (Broadchurch: Series Two Original Short Story)
Broadchurch: The End Is Where It Begins (Story 1): A Series Two Original Short Story (Broadchurch: Series Two Original Short Story)
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4.0 out of 5 stars More than a cash-in, 11 July 2015
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I was a little worried these Broadchurch short stories would be little more than a cash-in to a popular TV show and that they wouldn't actually anything of value. Actually though this is a decent little story which expands Broadchurch.

Set before S2Ep1, this story focuses on Ellie Miller in her new uniform policing job in Exmoor. It's mainly about how Ellie is coping with the events of series 1, what with husband Joe being the killer, and the answer is obviously not very well. Being a book from an omnipresent narrator we get to properly see into her thoughts, something the TV show obviously can't manage.

There is a plot to the story as we see Miller and her new partner deal with a domestic abuse case- a family man who is threatening the lives of his children. This clearly reflects what has happened in Miller's own life, which is convenient but serves to bring us a bit more emotion.

It's by no means cheery but this short story does a wonderful job at getting inside the head of Broachurch's Ellie Miller. It is packed full of the same emotion as the TV series and that makes it a worthwhile read. Certainly not a must read for Broadchurch fans, it doesn't add anything new but it expands on a great character. Surprisingly enjoyable!


Broadchurch: Old Friends (Story 3): A Series Two Original Short Story (Broadchurch: Series Two Original Short Story)
Broadchurch: Old Friends (Story 3): A Series Two Original Short Story (Broadchurch: Series Two Original Short Story)
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3.0 out of 5 stars Why Jocelyn Wasn't in Broadchurch Series 1, 11 July 2015
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This latest Broadchurch short story focuses on Jocelyn Knight, the prosecution barrister in the big trial of series 2. It is set way before the first series, in 2002, and expands on a the character and her links to Broadchurch.

I personally felt this was a bit weaker than the first stories. For one thing it felt like it only exists to fill in the gap that Jocelyn wasn't in the first series of Broadchurch. It also features a character from series 1 for no apparent reason, and I was skeptical it really worked with the character's age.

It did bring the character of Jocelyn to life a bit more though and we also see a young Latimer family, which is utterly heart-breaking.

A change in style for this story which I don't think worked particularly well. Still a nice little read though.


ZOM-B Bride (Zom B Book 10)
ZOM-B Bride (Zom B Book 10)
Price: £4.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Zom-B goes even more bonkers, 11 July 2015
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(Spoiler free for this book but my review contains spoilers for previous books in the series)

So B has gone off with the crazy clown Mr. Dowling and his hoard of babies. Things are not looking good.

Except things are not as bad as they seem. Mr. Dowling has grand plans for B & they are pretty obvious from the title of the book. But surely B would never agree to such a thing...

This book is all about Mr. Dowling. He's a villain I've not been overly keen on thus far, too absurd & silent. But all that changes here. He's given a voice, although not in the obvious way, and we find out a lot more about him & who he was before he went mad. He is made more real & for the first time we have reason to sympathise with him.

We also learn more about the babies and B's connection to them. The creepy babies become weirdly likeable in this book, which I wouldn't have expected.

A great continuation of the series, less action-packed & more plot-driven but none the worse for it. It has a dramatic end & I already can't wait until the next one!


Broadchurch: The Letter (Story 2): A Series Two Original Short Story (Broadchurch: Series Two Original Short Story)
Broadchurch: The Letter (Story 2): A Series Two Original Short Story (Broadchurch: Series Two Original Short Story)
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5.0 out of 5 stars I thought this was even better than the first one, 11 July 2015
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I thought this was even better than the first one. Set shortly before S2Ep2, it focuses on Maggie Radcliffe, editor of Broadchurch Echo. It's interesting that it focuses on a minor character of the series, one that is fairly minor to the overall plot but it works so well.

There's several elements to this story. On the one hand it delves into the psyche of an interesting character & a dramatically changing industry. It's of course all set around the big trial, extending the story sideways. And the plot of the short story is an epiphany moment for Maggie.

This book contains pretty much everything that makes the TV show so good. It's the big events affecting the ordinary people, here even people not directly connected to events.

Also, these e-books are good fun when watching the show. There was a line from Ellie Miller in episode 2 about working in Devon, which immediately made you think of the first story. It's great to have the extra stuff given to us in these stories.


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