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Dr J. C. Lennard (Cambridge, UK)

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For Love and Money: The Literary Art of the Harlequin Mills & Boon Romance (Genre Fiction Monographs)
For Love and Money: The Literary Art of the Harlequin Mills & Boon Romance (Genre Fiction Monographs)
by Laura Vivanco
Edition: Paperback
Price: 15.92

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book is NOT unavailable or out of stock in the usual sense, 4 Jan 2012
I am the editor of this book for Humanities-Ebooks, and the statement that it is "out of stock" is potentially misleading. This is a print-on-demand paperback edition, and will be supplied as soon as an order is placed.

John Lennard


The Sharing Knife: Horizon (The Sharing Knife Series Book 4)
The Sharing Knife: Horizon (The Sharing Knife Series Book 4)
Price: 5.15

5.0 out of 5 stars A marvellous four-decker novel, 5 Oct 2011
I'd endorse what reviewer Paul Durrant says above -- if you like *Beguilement* you'll certainly want to read the other three parts -- but while *The Sharing Knife* does divide into two diptyches (Beguilement + Legacy, Passage + Horizon), it's all one novel : a marvellous four-decker that *seems* simple as you go along but adds up to an extremely subtle and intelligent work that explores romance tropes, in the senses of both adventure and love, but is also a telling critique of many elements in fantasy.

Some of that critique lies in the very subtle web of connections Bujold creates between her protagonists and their respective cultures, and in the nature of the central totemic object, the sharing knife of the general title. But there's also a sustained engagement with Tolkien's *The Lord of the Rings*, a book Bujold rates and values highly but has also, over forty years, come to find religiose in the wrong ways, as well as sexist in predictable ways.

Bujold said in an interview given when the last volume was published that she thought *The Sharing Knife* was her "subtlest work yet*, and it is ; it's also perhaps her best, and as intelligent a fantasy as you can find in print today.


Passage (Sharing Knife)
Passage (Sharing Knife)
by Lois McMaster Bujold
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: 4.69

5.0 out of 5 stars A marvellous four-decker novel, 5 Oct 2011
I'd endorse what reviewer Paul Durrant says in reviewing *Beguilement* on this site -- if you like *Beguilement* you'll certainly want to read the other three parts -- but while *The Sharing Knife* does divide into two diptyches (Beguilement + Legacy, Passage + Horizon), it's all one novel : a marvellous four-decker that *seems* simple as you go along but adds up to an extremely subtle and intelligent work that explores romance tropes, in the senses of both adventure and love, but is also a telling critique of many elements in fantasy.

Some of that critique lies in the very subtle web of connections Bujold creates between her protagonists and their respective cultures, and in the nature of the central totemic object, the sharing knife of the general title. But there's also a sustained engagement with Tolkien's *The Lord of the Rings*, a book Bujold rates and values highly but has also, over forty years, come to find religiose in the wrong ways, as well as sexist in predictable ways.

Bujold said in an interview given when the last volume was published that she thought *The Sharing Knife* was her "subtlest work yet*, and it is ; it's also perhaps her best, and as intelligent a fantasy as you can find in print today.


The Sharing Knife: Beguilement
The Sharing Knife: Beguilement
Price: 5.15

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great four-decker novel, 5 Oct 2011
I'd endorse what reviewer Paul Durrant says above -- if you like *Beguilement* you'll certainly want to read the other three parts -- but while *The Sharing Knife* does divide into two diptyches (Beguilement + Legacy, Passage + Horizon), it's all one novel : a marvellous four-decker that *seems* simple as you go along but adds up to an extremely subtle and intelligent work that explores romance tropes, in the senses of both adventure and love, but is also a telling critique of many elements in fantasy.

Some of that critique lies in the very subtle web of connections Bujold creates between her protagonists and their respective cultures, and in the nature of the central totemic object, the sharing knife of the general title. But there's also a sustained engagement with Tolkien's *The Lord of the Rings*, a book Bujold rates and values highly but has also, over forty years, come to find religiose in the wrong ways, as well as sexist in predictable ways.

Bujold said in an interview given when the last volume was published that she thought *The Sharing Knife* was her "subtlest work yet*, and it is ; it's also perhaps her best, and as intelligent a fantasy as you can find in print today.


Paul Scott: 'The Raj Quartet' and 'Staying on' (Literature Insights.)
Paul Scott: 'The Raj Quartet' and 'Staying on' (Literature Insights.)

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The author replies ..., 14 Feb 2011
I am the author, John Lennard, replying to the criticisms by Lynx and J. Robinson.

I'm sorry they made mistakes and didn't get what they wanted, but to claim the product is misleading is seriously unfair. The term "Literature Insights" is in the title-line, as well as on the cover, and I am listed as the author. Anyone who thinks they're getting a strangely cheap edition of five Scott novels -really- isn't paying attention. Mistakes can happen easily with Kindle, which is why you have 24 hrs to return something -- but that doesn't make it the author's or the publisher's fault.

And then to review a book badly because -you- made a mistake is worse than unfair ; it's flatly unjust, and unjustified. Lynx and J. Robinson were not giving -my work- two stars (and they say nothing about it) but expressing their disappointments with their own mistakes by lashing out at me. Yes, this is a work of criticism, that others have found very helpful in reading and studying Scott ; no it's not Scott's work, and doesn't pretend to be.

There is as far as I know no digital edition of any of Scott's work available. I have tried in the past to find out why, and if any such edition is planned, but without joy. If you'd like to speed the process along, you can try writing to Heinemann in London, Scott's publishers, or to the agent Bruce Hunter, whose address is available online - and I'd like a digital edition as much as anyone.

In the meantime, if you'd like an original guide to Scott's huge work, with background, interpretation, and a substantial bibliography, for a low price, this is exactly what you're looking for.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 3, 2012 6:21 PM GMT


The Nature of Paleolithic Art
The Nature of Paleolithic Art
by R Dale Guthrie
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 38.50

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best kind of revision, 30 July 2010
I found this book through a recommendation by Lois McMaster Bujold in her blog, where she observed that it was one of the few books she'd read that remembered prehistoric women and children as well as men. And reading it has been a delight, revealing much of what I was taught and had picked up about prehistory - the magico-religious thesis, cave-art by adult shamans &c. - as seriously in error. Guthrie understands big-mammal hunting from personal experience, and as a paleobiologist has scientific skills most commentators of paleolithic art have lacked; he also writes very readably and argues very solidly.

He's also taught me a term that is very useful - taphonomic bias. Taphonomy (from Gk, taphos, a grave; cf. epitaph) was coined as the study of processes of fossilisation, and taphonomic bias explains why e.g. almost all fossils are of adult specimens, and most that can be sexed of adult males, primarily because only the most robust bones are likely to be fossilised. Guthrie applies the concept both to what paeleolithic art has survived and to what subjects artists chose to depict; and it can be applied more widely still, as to what events tend to be historically recorded &c..

The book is lavishly illustrated, but the monochrome images of drawings aren't (as so often) made coffee-table-book-ish, nor Dorling Kindersley bright; instead they pack a steady, cumulative punch supporting Guthrie's intensely observed, carefully comparitive, and profoundly persuasive argument that what we find on cave walls isn't religious adult art but largely drawings by young men of 'testosterone events' centred on hunting and sexuality.

An eye-opener and a thought-provoker in more ways than one. Highly recommended.


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