Shop now Shop now Shop now Up to 70% off Fashion Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Amazon Fire TV Subscribe and Save Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now Shop now
Profile for J. Chippindale > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by J. Chippindale
Top Reviewer Ranking: 549
Helpful Votes: 9529

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
J. Chippindale (England)
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20
pixel
Sandstorm (Sigma Force 1) by Rollins. James ( 2010 ) Paperback
Sandstorm (Sigma Force 1) by Rollins. James ( 2010 ) Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Some Secrets are Best Left Alone, 3 Jun. 2014
This is a tale of a lost city, buried beneath the sands of the Arabia desert. A lost city where something astonishing is waiting for the unwary. Lady Kara Kensington's family paid a high price, both financially and also in blood sweat and tears to found the gallery that now lies in ruins after a savage explosion devastates the building and its contents.

Her search for answers to the tragedy leads her along a path to a part of the world she never knew existed while wrapped in her own little cocoon of wealth and luxury. It leads her to the lost city. But she is not alone, a government representative is also drawn there. What lies at the end of the dangerous journey that leads them there. Is it a power that can and will create good for all mankind. Or is it something that will destroy everything that man has worked for through the centuries.

I find James Rollins books totally captivating and in the unputdownable category. He has a penchant for storytelling that few can match. There is never a dull moment in a James Rollins book.


A Murder on the Appian Way (Roma sub Rosa) by Saylor, Steven Re-issue Edition (2005)
A Murder on the Appian Way (Roma sub Rosa) by Saylor, Steven Re-issue Edition (2005)

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fifth in a Captivating Series, 3 Jun. 2014
Steven Saylor's series of books about Ancient Rome and featuring Gordianus the Finder are extremely popular both here in England and also in America. Anyone who is a fan of Lindsey Davis will love these books too. Steven Saylor brings Ancient Rome to life, so much so that the reader can lose himself in the pages of these books. The series started in 1991 with Roman Blood (Gordianus the Finder, Book 1)

Gordianus the Finder, is the investigator of crimes, a man whose skill and integrity have made him much sought after by some of the most important men in Rome. Men who may need a secret to be kept, men who need to know that when Gordianus is working for them he will be discreet and not susceptible to bribery.

In this book Gordianus the Finder is assigned to a case by the great man himself, Pompey. He is now one of the most important, if not the most important man in Rome, although perhaps the Julius Caesar of later times may argue with that. Pompey is determined to find out about the disappearance of the high born politician Publius Clodius. His disappearance has caused a great upheaval in the city of Rome, with riots on the streets and bouts of arson taking place. He needs Gordianus to find out what happened to Clodius and quickly before the mob destroy the city.

I am always waiting in anticipation of the next in the series.


The Devil in the Marshalsea: Thomas Hawkins Book 1
The Devil in the Marshalsea: Thomas Hawkins Book 1
by Antonia Hodgson
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Refreshingly Different Slant on a Murder Mystery, 31 May 2014
This is the author's first book and if it is a taste of things to come I am sure there will be a multitude of readers of historical fiction waiting with baited breath for the next offering, If this is truly how the notorious debtor's prisons of London, the Marshalsea and the Fleet were run, then it is a wonder any of the inmates ever had the good fortune to be released from them.

The Marshalsea is depicted as a prison within a prison. On one side of the wall that divides the prison in two are the more well to do prisoners. They are in the Master's side, though how anyone who is a debtor can be classed as well to do is difficult to comprehend. These "privileged" prisoners are allowed the freedom of their side of the jail, some of them even running businesses, such as the chop house, where food may be purchased by the prisoners, and the Tap Room where drinks are sold to the prison inmates at extortionate prices. If hard drink is not to your liking, there is always Sarah Bradshaw's coffee house where the long hours of the day can be passed more bearably, amid somewhat dubious companionship. On the other side of the wall, the Common side, are the poor wretches, who have no such privileges, and are treated like cattle, or worse. The prisoners who have no means of supporting themselves and no one on the outside who can provide them with the small sums needed to make their lives more bearable suffer unspeakable hardships. Even in death their bodies are not released to relatives without a payment being made to the authorities.

The author has given this murder mystery a new and clever twist by creating a storyline that deviates from the norm. Instead of an inquisitor trying to solve a murder, and put the perpetrator in jail for the crime, the author has created a plot where the murdered person, Captain Roberts was already in jail and the inquisitor, Tom Hawkins who has also recently been put in the Marshalsea for a twenty pounds debt has been given the task of finding the murderer, having been promised that if he succeeds he will be released from the Marshalsea.

The book flowed smoothly and was refreshingly different. The storyline held my attention throughout. The dirt and squalor of eighteenth century London is brilliantly portrayed and made for an interesting and thought provoking novel.


Weihrauch .22 (5.51mm) Field Target Special Pellets FT - 200
Weihrauch .22 (5.51mm) Field Target Special Pellets FT - 200
Offered by Shooting and Scuba
Price: £6.29

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Consistent in Quality, 27 May 2014
Weihrauch is a German manufacturer of target and sporting air rifles and pistols, and have always been up there with the very best manufacturers of air weapons. German engineering skills are among the best available. Do these skills transfer to pellet manufacture. Well, yes, I think they do. Many people who shoot air guns would say a tin of pellets is a tin of pellets, but if you are a little more discerning in your choice of ammunition you begin to look for uniformity in both shape and weight in individual pellets within a batch of pellets.

Whether these pellets are suitable for your particular airgun is to a degree trial and error. I used them in an Air Arms S400 rifle with telescopic sight attached, firing from the prone position, with the rifle supported (necessary to remove as many variable as possible and make each shot as uniform as possible) and found the target groupings to be tight and accurate. You will only find out if they perform in the same way with your own gun by purchasing a tin and testing them. Many people feel that either their gun is inaccurate, or they are not a very good shot. Often it is the fact that the ammunition they use is not ideal for the airgun they are using, or worse the pellets are of inferior quality. The bottom line is some pellets perform better than others in certain airguns. The tin of pellets I bought were good and of a uniform quality, if a little pricey, You will only find out if they are the ones for you by testing some. Shooting at a target, in as favourable conditions as possible, to aid accurate and consistent shooting, will hopefully give you the answer.
A dirty gun barrel can also be detrimental to accuracy. Try putting VFG 177 Cleaning Felt Pellets (box of 100). These can also be purchased in .22 calibre.


Iron and Rust (Throne of the Caesars, Book 1)
Iron and Rust (Throne of the Caesars, Book 1)
by Harry Sidebottom
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £9.00

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Start to a New Series, 27 May 2014
It does not seem two minutes since I was happy in the knowledge that I had found a new author, one who wrote books about a period of history I enjoyed reading about immensely. Harry Sidebottom, is an author whose first book in the Warrior of Rome series Warrior of Rome I: Fire in the East got me hooked, not only on his writing style and storytelling ability, but also his knowledge of the period. I have not missed one of his books since. Fire in the East (2008), held my attention from the first page to the last. The following five books in the series were just as enjoyable and eagerly awaited.

Iron and Rust is the first book in a new series, Throne of the Caesars and initially for me, that showed. Most new things take a little getting used to, and that is how I felt when I began reading this book. For the first few chapters I was not particularly enamoured with the book, but as it progressed I began to enjoy it more and more. The period the book covers contains some of the best known names of the time and could easily be misconstrued as a "Who's Who" of the Roman world. However this feeling of being treated to a history lesson, albeit an interesting one, soon fades as the storytelling prowess of the author begins to shine through.

My initials thoughts were that I was not going to enjoy this book as much as the author's other offerings, but the book grew on me, or I grew into the book and I was left feeling sorry that it had come to an end. I am now looking forward to the next one in the series. If the ones that follow are anything like the author's first series they will just get better and better.


The Twelve Children of Paris
The Twelve Children of Paris
by Tim Willocks
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Awash with Blood and Guts, 26 May 2014
I have to start by saying that this is probably the most bloody, brutal and violent book that I have ever read, and at seventy three years old (me, not the book) and an avid reader all my life, that is an enormous number of books. Just a single chapter covering the rescue of the printer Daniel Malan's daughter's Flore and Pascale from their house, contains more blood and death than the average abattoir sees in a week.

I do not say this to shock the prospective reader, or to give the impression that the book is simply a vehicle for the author to describe as many different ways as possible to kill a human being using a sword, dagger or other implements available to a trained fighting man in the sixteenth century. The book is the second in the series, The Religion being the first. It takes place as the title states in Paris in 1572 and is one man's search (Mattias Tannhauser) for his pregnant wife (Carla) at a time when the city is plunged into turmoil, as the slaying of thousands of Huguenots begins. The book is almost seven hundred and fifty pages long, but the story is confined to a relatively short period of time and follows Mattias's frantic search for his wife. On his travels through the streets of Paris, Mattias begins to accumulate a following of children who for whatever reason cross his path and become embroiled with him in what seems a more and more futile trail around the streets and alleyways of Paris, hoping for some sign, or news of Carla.

The book held my attention from start to finish. The story was well constructed, and the characters believable, with strong personalities. Although the blood and gore I mentioned earlier did not offend me in the slightest, for my own personal taste parts of it seemed a little gratuitous and could safely have been edited out, without spoiling the book in any way. Others may well think more of the same please. I do love my historical novels and this is a good one.


Catilina's Riddle (Gordianus the Finder 3) by Saylor, Steven Published by Robinson (2011)
Catilina's Riddle (Gordianus the Finder 3) by Saylor, Steven Published by Robinson (2011)

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Book Three in the Sub Rosa Series, 25 May 2014
Steven Saylor's Sub Rosa series now numbers over a dozen and their popularity continues to grow and grow. The main character Gordianus the Finder, is an investigator of crimes. His skills are much sought after by some of the most powerful men in Rome. The series started in 1991 with Roman Blood (Gordianus the Finder, Book 1)

The year is 63 BC and Gordianus has been left every Roman's dream, a farm in the Etruscan countryside. He immediately decides to up sticks and get his family out of the city that is becoming more decadent with every passing day. He is more than happy to escape all the politics and intrigue that surround him. But is anything as simple as that?

Cicero, a man he has worked for before wants to hire him to gain evidence against the popular politician Catilina. The politician is a charismatic man, but also a very dangerous one and Gordianus is no longer interested in putting himself and his family at risk, that is until the first headless corpse is found down his well .

These books are a really good read. They tend to be more serious than the Falco novels by Lindsey Davis, but they can be amusing on occasions. If you have not read one before, I recommend them to you.


Dangerous Days in the Roman Empire: Terrors and Torments, Diseases and Deaths (Dangerous Days 1) by Deary, Terry (2013) Hardcover
Dangerous Days in the Roman Empire: Terrors and Torments, Diseases and Deaths (Dangerous Days 1) by Deary, Terry (2013) Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting and Amusing, 23 May 2014
Terry Deary hit upon a winning formula for the children’s series Horrible Histories and he has certainly carried it through to this adult book. The book is both interesting and amusing in equal quantities. The book is full to the brim with true and equally important, interesting facts about Ancient Rome. I know I keep using the word interesting, but that is what shines through in this book these facts are interesting.

If only history had been told in this way at school there would have been a lot less children praying for the end of their history lesson. I would say the book is a terrific read, but it is in fact a compilation of facts rather than a story. It can be read occasionally, picking out the odd fact, but I read it from front to back in quick time and loved it.


Dangerous Days in the Roman Empire: Terrors and Torments, Diseases and Deaths
Dangerous Days in the Roman Empire: Terrors and Torments, Diseases and Deaths
by Terry Deary
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Informative and Amusing, 23 May 2014
Terry Deary hit upon a winning formula for the children’s series Horrible Histories and he has certainly carried it through to this adult book. The book is both interesting and amusing in equal quantities. The book is full to the brim with true and equally important, interesting facts about Ancient Rome. I know I keep using the word interesting, but that is what shines through in this book these facts are interesting.

If only history had been told in this way at school there would have been a lot less children praying for the end of their history lesson. I would say the book is a terrific read, but it is in fact a compilation of facts rather than a story. It can be read occasionally, picking out the odd fact, but I read it from front to back in quick time and loved it.


Anger of God: A Brother Athelstan Medieval Mystery 4
Anger of God: A Brother Athelstan Medieval Mystery 4
Price: £4.79

5.0 out of 5 stars The Fourth Book in the Series, 23 May 2014
This is the fourth book in the Sorrowful Mysteries of Brother Athelstan series. This novel is one of Paul Doherty’s early offerings. Since publishing this novel he has gone on to write one hundred novels and is now an established author of medieval novels He has also added a growing number of novels on Ancient Egypt to his ever growing list of titles. Even though this is one of his early offerings don’t be fooled into thinking that it may be inferior to his current books, quite the contrary. Paul Doherty has found another winner with the Brother Athelstan series.

The year is 1379, England is a seething mass of discontent. John of Gaunt has a hold on the English crown and the English are less than happy with this hard and domineering man who has grabbed at the opportunity to rule as Regent. So much so that the peasants are planning a revolt. The revolt is being organised through a network of go betweens and Brother Athelstan is worried that some of his parishioners may have been ill advised and secretly joined those who wish to bring down John of Gaunt.

When some of Gaunt's plans are foiled by a series of murders, the Regent is incensed and calls on the services of Sir John Cranston and his friend and secretary Brother Athelstan to assist in solving the crimes.

These books are well written and researched and are a joy for anyone interested in the period of history they portray. The characters of Brother Athelstan and Sir John Cranston are likable and more importantly believable.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20