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Mr. Roberto Sans "columela" (Malaga, Spain)
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The Angel's Game
The Angel's Game
by Carlos Ruiz Zafon
Edition: Hardcover

5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Typical disappointment in a second (or sixth) novel, 2 July 2009
This review is from: The Angel's Game (Hardcover)
I bought this book after enjoying very much the previous novel "the shadow of the Wind". However this book was a disappointment. The plot is uncomprehensible, the characters are dull or confusing and the satanism is quite ridiculous. I would consider this book more succesful if the writer had left some clues to make me think that this was no other than another feuilleton like those described in the first half of the novel. However, even when the epilogue was suggesting this I could not buy it. On the other hand, the description of 1929-30 Barcelona is quite inadequate, as there are other novels by local authors ( La ciudad de los prodigios by Eduardo Mendoza comes to mind)that reflect much more accurately the local atmosphere and the political and social upheval of these years. This is more typical of 1830's London than to 1930's Barcelona. However, some memorable sentences remain in the mind and the book is acceptable for entertainment, but it is far from the moving masterpiece that "The shadow of the Wind" was.
I seriously hope that Mr Ruiz Zafón changes his plans for more novels in this sort of Universe.Do not overkill a beautiful novel just for commercial succes.


Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire: Vols 4-6: Volumes 4,5,6 The Eastern Empire: v. 4-6 (Everyman's Library Classics)
Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire: Vols 4-6: Volumes 4,5,6 The Eastern Empire: v. 4-6 (Everyman's Library Classics)
by Edward Gibbon
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £45.00

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A treasure of wisdom and foresight, 15 Jan. 2008
After more than a year, I finally managed to read the final 3 volumes of the History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. This is one of the few books that have really changed my views not just on the Roman Empire, but on human nature and everything really. It is such a convincing argument regarding how transient and delicate every human entreprise really is. I could not find any other book that was so useful to me to understand what is going on on today's world. We are also in the middle of a great transformation which might turn out for the worse regarding everything from the economy to the environment, and the cautionary tale of how the alliance of religious zeal and increased tyranny did the Romans weaker to withstand the push of the barbarians is fully aplicable to today. I enjoyed the rhythm of the prose, the wonderful descriptions of the sieges and battles, the unforgettable characters like Julian, Hypatia, Constantine, Athanasius, Teodoric, Belisarius, Mohamed, John II, Constantine XI, Bajacet or Cola di Rienzi, just to name a few. This is very serious reading but it is far more enjoyable and easier than I thought taking into account what I have read about this book before starting it.
The last thing that i can say is: more than 4000 pages and I would have enjoyed more.


Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire: Vols 1-3: 3 Volume Set (Everyman's Library Classics)
Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire: Vols 1-3: 3 Volume Set (Everyman's Library Classics)
by Edward Gibbon
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £45.00

26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is how we became what we are now, 23 Jun. 2007
I have just finished the 3 volumes of the first half of "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire" by Gibbon. This is one of the most important books I have ever read. There is nothing superfluous or uninteresting in this huge opus. The description of how a very organised, civilised and rich society came to an end is as passionating as it is frightening in the times in which we live. Much of what Gibbon wrote about is happening now in our society, the rise of intolerant religion, the movement of different peoples from what it was then the third world to the most prosperous society of the Romans, the lack of civil spirit.The book in itself is written in a marvelous witty and grandiose style which is very becoming to this kind of subject. I found the footnotes very ironic or really sarcastic. I am now in the fourth volume and as soon as I finish it I will feel very happy of having had the inmense luck of finding such an extraordinary book which has deeply influenced me.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 20, 2013 8:25 PM BST


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