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naresh1969@aol.com (Northern Ireland)

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Understanding Air France 447
Understanding Air France 447
Price: £4.43

4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent technical treatise, 27 Jun. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
If you are expecting a dramatic non fiction account of what happened to this tragic flight then this isn't for you. If you are an interested amateur or work in the industry or just simply want to know in technical terms what happened this is a brilliantly researched book.


Combat of Shadows
Combat of Shadows
by Manohar Malgonkar
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Mills and Boon meets EM Forster., 12 Mar. 2014
This review is from: Combat of Shadows (Paperback)
This an amazingly entertaining, yet complex novel set in the tea growing area of north east india during the last years of indian rule. Mills and Boon meets EM Forster but in a highly accomplished and well crafted yarn. A tyro tea planter falls for an Anglo indian maiden but the conventions of the time and his own innate snobbishness prevent him from marrying her. Malgonkar immerses you in the world of the tea plantation and restive independence politics in a way which is both gripping, tragic and often funny. The plotting is flawless and the final denouments will leave you reeling. Someone should seriously dramatise this. It's simply brilliant.


A Very Peculiar Practice - The Complete BBC Series - [Network] - [DVD] [1986]
A Very Peculiar Practice - The Complete BBC Series - [Network] - [DVD] [1986]
Dvd ~ Peter Davison
Price: £12.50

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ahead of its time. Predicted the future with hairbreadth accuracy!, 24 Feb. 2014
This amazing satirical series about medicine and university life first aired in the mid eighties. It boasted an accomplished ensemble of British acting talent and a witty script by a young Andrew Davies. The production values are fairly standard for the time but it stands up very well as the real power is in the acting and script. The series accurately predicts (with the thatcher era full flow) the commercialisation of medicine and even more starkly the privatisation of the university sector. This eventually came to pass with lucrative foreign fee paying students bolstering dwindling coffers. Brilliant acting all round not least from a diffident Peter Davidson but the late Graham Crowden and Barbara Flynn also shine.
As a medical student in a red brick at the time the series really struck a chord. I seriously toyed with the idea of a career in a student health centre. Also Amanda Hillwood shared a real chemistry with Peter Davidson and it's a shame we didn't see much more of her after this apart from the doomed stewardess in die hard 2. Really demonstrates the simple genius of the BBC in its heyday


Otovent Glue Ear Treatment Pack
Otovent Glue Ear Treatment Pack
Price: £7.56

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Ear popping good!, 12 Nov. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I have had middle ear effusion following head colds for years. This is often exacerbated by flying leaving me partially deaf for several weeks. I have tried decongestants, olbas oil and the valsalva monoeuvre. This cheap simple idea has worked well and following a recent head cold my hearing has returned in double quick time. Easy to use. Lots of satisfying popping as pressure equalises. Give it a whirl!


The Lowland
The Lowland
Price: £6.02

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Should have won the Booker!, 18 Oct. 2013
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This review is from: The Lowland (Kindle Edition)
Ms Lahiri is not the most prolific of authors but it is better to wait for highly polished gems than swathes of gaudy trinkets. The lowland is only her second novel and fourth major work published in almost fifteen years. Nevertheless, this is a work of considerable depth and is an epic tale of civil and family conflict as well as multi generational in its sweep. Two brothers grow up in humble circumstances in Calcutta. One becomes a bookish intellectual and emigrates to the US; the other follows his socialist ideals but embarks on a path as a Naxalite insurgent. The latter course of action has tragic consequences which then reverberate for decades to come.

Ms Lahiri's spare writing style conveys everything without recourse to metaphor or dictionary. The territory is familiar for Ms Lahiri; Bengali emigres in East Coast, US Universities. There is an enlightening analysis of the Naxalites which as the novel deftly illustrates continue their rumble of insurgency in India to the present day but continue to fail to make any lasting impact or penetrate public consciousness in a meaningful way. She also explores the ambiguity and complexity of civil conflict and allows readers to conclude who are the heroes and villains; victims and protagonists.
The novel provides amazing insights into the human psyche; but somewhat unexpectedly in a section near the end in a few masterful pages describes perfectly the impact of the internet on 21st century society (just astounding)

Any criticisms are minor. Ms Lahiri continues to focus on a small group of the Indian diaspora with whom she is intimately familiar. The central character Subhash is slightly two dimensional; dutiful, studious always doing the right thing. There is a touch of the "Gandhi in London" about him although he does eat meat, drink beer and bed an american woman (although he is consumed by angst). Also, unless I missed something the work is almost entirely lacking in any humour.

Nevertheless this is a significant work and should easily have taken the Booker prize. Well done Ms Lahiri for producing a boook of depth and lasting emotional impact.


U480 CAN-Bus OBDII OBD2 EOBD Trouble Code Read Diagnose Tester Diagnostic Scanner
U480 CAN-Bus OBDII OBD2 EOBD Trouble Code Read Diagnose Tester Diagnostic Scanner
Offered by BV-electronics
Price: £11.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cheap, cheerful effective, 7 Sept. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I had a long running issue with an engine management light on my mazda 6. There was no major issue causing it to trigger but the dealership and head office continued to blame my driving style. Anyway in order to avoid repeated diagnostics and huge bills I came upon this simple device. It arrived the day after ordering and in a few minutes I had reset a recently triggered light. The code was the same benign one which was the recurrent issue. Simply plug in and go through the menus as advised in the manual. Don't worry if it doesn't uplink immediately. Just try again. Years of niggly frustration solved! Also dealerships are just ripping people off for a few minutes of work.


Paddy Indian
Paddy Indian
by Cauvery Madhavan
Edition: Paperback

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A mildly amusing but deeply flawed first novel, 16 Jan. 2002
This review is from: Paddy Indian (Paperback)
As an asian with an Irish background, who also happens to be a Doctor it could be argued that I fit snugly into this books intended market.
The book examines the tangled lovelife of an upper middle class junior indian doctor (Padhman) newly arrived in Dublin.
He wastes no time in falling in love with a young houseman who also happens to be the eminent professor's daughter. There is of course the mandatory parental objection, cross cultural juxtaposition, a smattering of tragedy and a resolution of sorts. A bit like bollywood without the music!
This is a mildly amusing but deeply flawed first novel. Firstly the dialogue is written in that profoundly nauseating, prissy anglo indian style so beloved of Vikram Seth, Arundhati roy et al yet is so jarring and unconvincing if you really know how indians converse (still it perenially dupes the Booker judges so why not give it a try?)
The central protaganists are so two dimensional that to say they are innocuous is probably a bit strong. It is not even at all clear why they are mutually attracted to each other never mind why they should want to get married.
Padhmans extended snobbish family back in Madras again are just a collection of stereotypes with no quirkiness to make any of them stand out or evoke sympathy.
Mrs Chaudhury insists on interspersing the book with pointless, gratuitous, lingering descriptions of indian food. To be fair she describes food more skilfully than sex...
Still it is nice to have a novel which examines the much neglected Irish Indian experience and I suspect that a much stronger sequel will follow.


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