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Jongudmund "Jongudmund" (UK)

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"Parentalk" Guide to Your Child and the Internet
"Parentalk" Guide to Your Child and the Internet
by Jonathan Bartley
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Great book - if a bit short, 7 Sep 2007
A great book for non-technical parents. Like most books abotu computers it has already dated a bit.


Your Personal Penguin (Boynton on Board)
Your Personal Penguin (Boynton on Board)
by Sandra Boynton
Edition: Board book
Price: 5.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Read it, then download the song, 8 Jun 2007
This book is amazing. And if you go to the webite you can download it as a song which you'll end up humming to yourself frequently.


Teenagers! What Every Parent Has to Know
Teenagers! What Every Parent Has to Know
by Rob Parsons
Edition: Paperback

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rob Parsons scores again!, 25 May 2007
This is probably Rob's most specific book yet, even more so than The Money Secret and Heart of Success. True, there's the expected number of stories, but in the middle chapters - dealing with the big issues that affect teens and stress out parents - Rob includes an impressive amount of stats to back up the main thrust of the book.

And what is the main thrust of the book? Well, I was quite surprised. If I was asked to sum it up, I'd say: Being a parent of a teenager may be tough, but being a teenager is tough too, and like it or not, you've somehow got to help your kids get through the teenage years and out the other side. And the good news is that you can!

On the whole, Teenagers! What Every Parent Has to Know is incredibly positive. It doesn't shirk from the big issues - the prevalence of drugs, the ubiquity of sex, the dangers of the internet - but it doesn't leave you feeling like everything's hopeless. Most of all, it doesn't demonise teenagers, and it doesn't give parents a huge list of things they have to do. The suggestions Rob does give are sensible and most of all doable.

The section where Rob talks about the physical development of a teenager's brain, and why those changes will affect their social and communication skills will be an immense comfort to parents of sullen and sulky teens everywhere. And, while he does explain some of the dangers lurking out there for teenagers, Rob doesn't play on parents' fears by hyping up the scary side of growing up.

In conclusion, Teenagers! What Every Parent Has to Know is very even-handed - it treated teenagers with respect, and gives parents a fighting chance of surviving the teenage years.


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