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T. Grant "book maven"
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The Four Biggest Mistakes in Options Trading (Trade Secrets Ser)
The Four Biggest Mistakes in Options Trading (Trade Secrets Ser)
by Jay Kaeppel
Edition: Paperback

1.0 out of 5 stars Do not buy this, 2 Feb 2012
Even for a beginner, it would probably be a bad idea to purchase this book.

Its not even a big enough book to enable you to justify your purpose by arguing it will look good on your bookshelf. It won't.

Stay well away.


The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine
The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine
by Michael Lewis
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Almost tragic to think Michael Lewis may have missed his calling, 23 July 2011
Michael Lewis - perhaps more successfully than in this book's predecessor 'Liar's Poker' - shows us how tragic it is to think he may have missed his calling as a writer by fannying about in ignominy on the trading floor of some defunct bank.

Never mind the wit, the humour, the intelligence, and the best (simplest) explanation of the subprime loan debacle that I have ever come across, Lewis proves to be at the top of his game when it comes to the very essence of his craft: exciting, interesting writing. The reader never wants to put this book down for fear of missing what comes next.

A thoroughly enjoyable read.


Taleb on Risk: Dynamic Hedging
Taleb on Risk: Dynamic Hedging
by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 55.25

3.0 out of 5 stars A good book., 30 April 2011
This was probably the first book I ever read that covered options in such depth. A good and interesting read, you can learn a fair amount. As Taleb was an FX options practitioner, beware for most examples to be FX related.


The Street of Crocodiles and Other Stories (Penguin Classics)
The Street of Crocodiles and Other Stories (Penguin Classics)
by Jonathan Safran Foer
Edition: Paperback
Price: 9.49

1 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I really want to like it, 19 Mar 2011
When I found out Safran Foer's new book had something to do with Schulz' 'The Street of Crocodiles', I had to read it. As much as I try to, I don't love it. Full of weird and descriptive passages, with very little human conversation, it can be quite heavy reading.

Perhaps I will return to it in the future and love it as I should.


Information is Beautiful
Information is Beautiful
by David McCandless
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Cool book, 29 Dec 2010
Bought it for girlfriend as xmas present. She didn't love it. Her brother did. Perhaps more of a boys book. Very cool in my opinion (and her brother's).


Booky Wook 2: This time it's personal
Booky Wook 2: This time it's personal
by Russell Brand
Edition: Hardcover

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The sequel comes short..., 26 Nov 2010
Unfortunately, Brand's sophomore effort in the literary cum autobiography world is lacking what his debut book offered: original raw funnyness. While Booky Wooky the first kept me glued to the pages and laughing throughout, Booky Wooky 2 was full of stale old jokes I had seen him perform live or uninteresting celebrity stories. The first book, about a young Essex lad, and his trials and tribulations along the way to fame, was full of interesting stories and gambits we would never have otherwise known, whereas half of this book seemed to be about the Andrew Sachs scandal.

The problem really can be attributed to the slim comedian dilemma. In the recent semi-flop 'Funny Men', Jonah Hill's chubby character tells Seth Rogen's mediocre sized character that the reason he is not having success as a stand-up comic is that he has recently lost a lot of weight and in essence, people prefer to see fat losers on stage and laugh at them/with them. At a recent local stand-up gig I attended, a comedian opened with: 'I was bullied at school. How else do you think I started doing this?' Certainly, Russell's initial stories of awkward and sometimes abject failure - like the one where he chucked that prostitute's phone against the wall and then felt really bad - had a more intrinsically funny base for comedy than stories of how he nailed the most desirable woman in the UK.

And furthermore, the first book was all about a promiscuous junkie essentially, not taking life too seriously. This book, however, had almost every sentence (certainly the end of every chapter) punctuated with the fact that Russell was waiting for 'the one'. Sad as it is to say it because of course he deserves his happiness, but a successful monogamous Russell Brand is simply less funny.


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