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Clive Harlow (Hereford, United Kingdom)

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"The Times" Atlas of the Second World War
"The Times" Atlas of the Second World War
by John Keegan
Edition: Hardcover

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Where's Narvik?, 10 April 2011
I started reading Churchill's 6 volumes on the war, and realised soon after starting volume one that I hadn't a clue where Narvik was. I found it in my old school atlas, but it was difficult to work out why on earth it was so important, and rather laborious to follow the action. So I bought this atlas, and not only does it clearly show all the campaigns I'm reading about, but also has concise textual summaries of each of the campaigns (and a few photos too). The maps show the opposing forces, movements and battles quite clearly. My only reservation is that many of the maps abandon the 'north-up' convention and instead show an 'advancing forces perspective'. For example, the Malaya invasion maps are all 'upside-down'. But overall, an excellent and invaluable atlas.


Timex Expedition Men's Quartz Watch with Black Dial Analogue Display and Grey Textile Strap - T425714E
Timex Expedition Men's Quartz Watch with Black Dial Analogue Display and Grey Textile Strap - T425714E
Offered by Watches2U
Price: £27.00

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Had to send it back., 25 Nov. 2010
When I opened it, I tried to re-set the time and date, but the winder knob fell off. So I had to send it back. Shame, because it looked quite nice.


No Title Available

26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Logitech vs. Microsoft, 7 Nov. 2005
I wanted a couple of mice for laptops, and couldn't decide between the Microsoft and Logitech, both about the same price on Amazon. So I bought one of each, which means I can now give you a comparison, in case you have the same dilemma! First of all, if you're irritated by mice which don't work properly, and, like me, you have to work in a variety of locations on some horrid desks, you really, really need one of these mice. They both do the job, perfectly. The Logitech is slightly more sensitive. It works OK on a 2mm thick transparent PVC desk protector, whereas the Mictosoft doesn't. I also prefer the look of the Logitech, which is black, more rounded and fractionally smaller. The Microsoft is more lit up, with red light coming from all of the base and the little red logo on the front, whereas the Logitech has a small aperture. The Microsoft has a 'waisted' shape, which some people might find a better fit in the hand, Whereas the Logitech is oval. My vote? Spend a few pennies more for the Logitech.


Microsoft Blue Optical Mouse
Microsoft Blue Optical Mouse

25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Microsoft vs. Logitech, 7 Nov. 2005
I wanted a couple of mice for laptops, and couldn't decide between the Microsoft and Logitech, both about the same price on Amazon. So I bought one of each, which means I can now give you a comparison, in case you have the same dilemma! First of all, if you're irritated by mice which don't work properly, and, like me, you have to work in a variety of locations on some horrid desks, you really, really need one of these mice. They both do the job, perfectly. The Logitech is slightly more sensitive. It works OK on a 2mm thick transparent PVC desk protector, whereas the Mictosoft doesn't. I also prefer the look of the Logitech, which is black, more rounded and fractionally smaller. The Microsoft is more lit up, with red light coming from all of the base and the little red logo on the front, whereas the Logitech has a small aperture. The Microsoft has a 'waisted' shape, which some people might find a better fit in the hand, Whereas the Logitech is oval. My vote? Spend a few pennies more for the Logitech.


Step-by-Step Guide to Everything You Need to Know About Being a Sax Player: Stress-Free Introduction to Saxophone Playing (Beginners)
Step-by-Step Guide to Everything You Need to Know About Being a Sax Player: Stress-Free Introduction to Saxophone Playing (Beginners)
by David 'Baps' Baptiste
Edition: Paperback

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A different book about Sax playing, 19 Sept. 2004
I bought this book because I was not finding it easy to stay motivated while trying to teach myself by following tutorial books. I wanted something so that I could read more about what I was learning. And I have found it fascinating.
There is more detail than most tutorials on setting up, breathing and embouchure. Then there is a bit about how to blow a note or two and on musical notation, time, rhythm, and a diagram of all then notes on the sax. Then it gets into scales, chords and what you need to learn to practice. By the end of this relatively short book (40 A4 pages), you are told about transposition, joining a band, and playing in a studio!! By the way, it covers all types of Sax.
I'm very pleased with this book, and often pick it up to read a bit to renew my enthusiasm. I have no previous musical education, so I also find it useful as it provides a 'road map', and a flavour of what lies ahead.
I still need the tutorial books, to guide my actual day-to-day practising. This one is a good-value addition.


Restoring and Tuning Classic Motor Cycles
Restoring and Tuning Classic Motor Cycles
by Phil E. Irving
Edition: Paperback

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Motorcycling in the forties, 30 Oct. 2002
This is my favourite motorcycle book. The title's actually not quite accurate; it's a collection of articles written by Phil Irving for "Motor Cycling" magazine from 1944 to 1947 on preparing a standard motorcycle for performance. This is not aimed at professional workshops, rather at the amateur enthusiast working in his garage at home. The style is very readable and interesting, and there are plenty of illustrations, especially on how to do things without expensive tools. Various motorcycles are used as examples, and there are beautiful cutaway drawings of some engines. It's not a coffee-table glossy, and contains no colour photos of restored machines. It's a faithful reproduction of the magazine articles, with some modern advertisements included.
The author is best known as the designer of Vincent motorcycles, including the legendary "Black Shadow".
This book will give you many contented hours of reading (and re-reading), and some wonderful insights into motorcycling in the forties.


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