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Annie (Ireland)

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Where Power Lies: Prime Ministers V the Media
Where Power Lies: Prime Ministers V the Media
by Lance Price
Edition: Hardcover

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Spin doctors and hacks, 22 April 2010
I cannot recommend this book highly enough. This is a perfect read for anyone with the barest interest in: history, journalism, current affairs. A book balanced between recounting past PMs and dissecting the recent past, this will give anyone a thorough grounding in the gaffes and ingenious policies of times gone by. I especially liked Price's forthright comments about the "new" state of play between journos and politicos since the expenses crisis. Fantastic reading altogether.


The Bankers: How the Banks Brought Ireland to Its Knees
The Bankers: How the Banks Brought Ireland to Its Knees
by Shane Ross
Edition: Paperback

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a unique perspective on Ireland's financial crisis, 5 Nov 2009
Ross covers all the bases in this tome on the death knell of Ireland's finances. Written in an engaging and highly readable style that will be familiar to patrons of the Sunday Independent, where Ross is business editor, this book is carefully researched and yet packed with narrative detail. The author, as an Independent senator and financial journalist, seems uniquely placed to comment on the Irish banking crisis. The book particularly shines where Ross includes his own personal asides and recalls conversations (and run-ins) with some of the big names of the crisis.

Along with surveying the mis-deeds of bankers, stockbrokers, developers, politicians (and more), Ross does not omit to include the ever-important global context for the crisis. Whilst never expunging the bankers of their guilt, this does provide useful background and ensures interest can be kept for those more interested in how Ireland's crisis fits in with the rest of the world.

Undoubtedly, this work will chime in well with the sentiments of many who, warily eyeing the forthcoming NAMA legislation, feel cheated by the banks. And yet in his narrative Ross ensures we recognise the culture that fostered such recklessness.

I will be recommending this book to anyone who has any interest in the current state of Irish economics, and slotting it in on the Christmas list for all those 'hard to buy-for' friends.


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