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Jason Muxworthy (Woking, Surrey United Kingdom)

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Detailing and Modifying Ready-to-Run Locomotives in 00 Gauge: British Steam Locomotives, 1948-1968 v. 2
Detailing and Modifying Ready-to-Run Locomotives in 00 Gauge: British Steam Locomotives, 1948-1968 v. 2
by George Dent
Edition: Paperback
Price: £18.99

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Detailing and Modifying Ready-to-Run Locomotives in 00 Gauge: British Steam Locomotives, 1948-1968, 4 Aug. 2010
This book is brilliant, it makes no assuptions that you have a wealth of knowledge about steam engines without being patronising. Plenty of colour photos, it takes you through how to get the best out of your engines in easy step by step stages which will build not only skills but give you the confidence to do these things.

All I'd say is if you want to take the first step into a bigger world that will help you get the most out of your locos then buy this book and make that move up the ladder.


Swansea Pals
Swansea Pals
by Bernard Lewis
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £19.99

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Swansea Pals, 5 Nov. 2004
This review is from: Swansea Pals (Hardcover)
This book should be on the shelves of any student of the Great War. Its is well researched and contains a great many pictures that have never met the public gaze before.
Bernard Lewis' work is first class as he has charted the formation of the battalion from the outset of the war by the mayor of Swansea, it's training prior to being sent overseas and its actions at both Mametz Wood on the Somme, the now infamous first day of the Passendale offensive in 1917 and its part in the much forgotten last 100 days of the war, when the British Army was still advancing when the Armistice was signed in November 1918.
The book portrays superbly what were seemingly ordinary men thrust into an extra-ordinary environment to carry out an unimaginable task and one that they performed exceptionally well.
I myself tried to research this battalion as my great uncle (Sgt David Howell Evans) served with them, but was put off by what seemed like scant information. Fortunatly Bernard Lewis was not but off by such a trifling matter and has left no stone unturned in looking for documentary evidence for this book. He has truly done the memory of these brave men justice.


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