Profile for Jeff > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Jeff
Top Reviewer Ranking: 3,081
Helpful Votes: 1246

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Jeff "roadrunner" (uk)
(VINE VOICE)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20
pixel
Mark Hix on Baking
Mark Hix on Baking
by Mark Hix
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £18.95

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bit of a mixture, 7 Dec. 2012
This review is from: Mark Hix on Baking (Hardcover)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
My first thought was what a dull unimaginative cover. Not one to rush off the shelves! And what follows, in terms of presentation, is largely dark, the predominant colour, like said cover, being brown. But having said that, the photography is interesting with the nearest part clear and the rest out of focus. Someone's had the idea of using the font [?] of an old typewriter, partly for the cover and also on each page for added comments to the recipe by the author. Overall, it has a sort of rustic look. Unlike some reviewers, I actually liked the recipes. Not all tried yet of course but there's some interesting takes here on more 'normal' cooking much of it taken from other countries. He has a Pheasant Biryani which looks very different from what you might expect; a Timpano which looks delicious; a baked salmon from an old Russian recipe and Dhal puffs which look exciting! So all-in-all, better in content than in presentation.


Lonely Planet Pocket Paris (Travel Guide)
Lonely Planet Pocket Paris (Travel Guide)
by Lonely Planet
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.98

5.0 out of 5 stars Really useful, 5 Nov. 2012
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I've always been a bit dubious about these small guides but I must admit this one impressed me. It's an excellent mix of colour photos with recommended places to go, which you'd expect but I do like their choice, based on what I know of Paris and what I look forward to finding out! Map at the back is useful as well. It's compact yet functional and expertly produced. All-in-all, I can recommend it highly.


Goldilocks
Goldilocks
by Allan Ahlberg
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £9.74

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Totally brilliant, 28 Oct. 2012
This review is from: Goldilocks (Hardcover)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I don't know who enjoyed this more - me or my 5-yr old grandaughter. Certainly we both had a great laugh and I guess that it's set to run and run. What the Ahlbergs have contributed to children's literature over the years is a joy and something to treasure. The drawings are fun and detailed, the story a twist on the usual and the pop-up play in the middle a gold mine in itself. Totally wonderful. Get it for Christmas and give to anyone you care for between say 4 and 7, but whatever you do, have a sneak read first!!!!


Kitchin Suppers
Kitchin Suppers
by Tom Kitchin
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £20.00

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Proper cooking!, 23 Oct. 2012
This review is from: Kitchin Suppers (Hardcover)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I must say I've always liked Tom Kitchin. I've only ever seen him as an occasional guest on 'Masterchef' but he comes across as down-to-earth unlike many TV chefs who are ever out to bolster their egos. And this book exemplifies that. When I looked yesterday, it wasn't to be found on the supermarket shelf amidst the Nigellas et al and is, I think, much the better for it. There is enough here to keep most cooks going all year and it's far too early for me to comment on practicalities! He has a considerable range, from breads [the Dried Fruit and Walnut looks especially appealing] to main meals. For all that he is a Michelin chef, there's Pot au Feu here and Haggis, Neeps and Tatties as well as Beef Wellington [if you must!]. Unusual, in my experience of recent cookery books, is the quality of photography, which is superb. Clear, colourful and well chosen, they're totally excellent. And there are no photos of him other than the front page and no scenic photos of Scotland. That's what I mean by being a proper cookbook. If you're looking to buy a Christmas present [and hope to benefit from it!!] then look no further. I think it's a brilliant book and recommend it highly.


No Title Available

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent if used properly, 23 Oct. 2012
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Aimed at the small office, this is the smallest of the Rexel Auto+ range. It's quite compact and can fit easily under a desk. The autofeed is really useful - it works efficiently and fairly quietly. Be aware, though, that it isn't a 'diamond' cutter if that's important to you. It's worked well for me so far but too early to comment on reliability except that in my experience shredders reward careful handling. Be too rough on them, expecting them to handle just about anything for about half an hour non-stop and you're going to have problems. This one will take up to 60 sheets and can be safely left to its business. As with many these days, it claims to take credit cards [!] but I've always felt better with a pair of scissors for that task. All-in-all, a fine machine which I can recommend.


Blood Diamond (Pirate Devlin, Book 3)
Blood Diamond (Pirate Devlin, Book 3)
by Mark Keating
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £18.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Could have been better, 11 Oct. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Sorry to spoil the party but I have concerns here. Dandon, about half way through, says, 'Devlin's changed' and I think he has. So has much of the style. This one isn't so much Treasure Island as Ocean's Eleven! I was really annoyed by the number of modern Americanisms in a story set in 1720 - an Anglo-Irish pirate using 'gotten'? 'dove'for 'dived'; 'hung'for 'hanged'; 'barkeep';'September fourth';'he lay a hand on';'the cane had been thieved'. Come on!! Is there no editing these days? And whilst I'm about it, have the publishers correctly quoted the Peterborough Evening News on the back cover? I'd have thought Sharpe and Hornblower had more than two fans?! I just think that, when asking punters to part with £18.99, more care should have been put into the package. It means I won't be back.


A Wanted Man: (Jack Reacher 17)
A Wanted Man: (Jack Reacher 17)
by Lee Child
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £18.14

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Lost in the outback, 22 Sept. 2012
Anyone else notice the guy on the cover is facing the wrong way?
Kind of sums up the novel really.
Would you really warm to someone who could immediately tell you the population of Newcastle or the postcode for everywhere in Wales? I think not.
Yet that's what Reacher seems to have become.
Not your best Lee - by a long way.


Weirdo
Weirdo
by Cathi Unsworth
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.99

7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Social evil, 15 Aug. 2012
This review is from: Weirdo (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I began by enjoying this book then became disillusioned with it and critical so that by the end I had a rather sour taste in my mouth, reflecting the sordid nature of the contents. Its central theme is hardly new to fiction or cinema - a small town, sick with at best social, inbreeding, tries to keep the past under the carpet until in comes an outsider to sort them out. Think of Spencer Tracy, Sidney Poitier or even Jack Reacher. It's an attempt at that vague concept called 'noir'. It has some of the ingredients - bent cop "this is my town" and a seedy fairground owner of highly dubious morals. Much revolves around a group of local youths in 1984, their relationship, dress and music style [it was the punk era] and although redolent of that time it's still a common theme that transcends generations. Every other chapter sees the same characters, in the same town, twenty years later. And maybe that's a point Unsworth's trying to make - no-one's left, the place and its people have grown stale, they've become used to 'forgetting' and not rocking the boat. Set in a [hopefully!!] fictional town on the Norfolk coast, no-one seems to have been further than Norwich. And speaking [sic] of Norfolk, Unsworth has taken a,to me, dangerous decision to reflect local dialect in writing. I've always thought that was best avoided. You have a DCI - "you mean that weren't in all them notes" or a supposedly urbane teacher - "I hope this don't mean what I think it do". That grated, as did the overuse of "where are you now going?". It may well be local idiom but so is "a-goin up Narj" so how far do you go? I'm not convinced. So is it a crime novel? Despite there being crimes in it, no it isn't. Despite there being policemen in it, it's not a police procedural. As I've said, it's a picture of a diseased small community. There are some very unpleasant people in it [both young and old], some woefully inept parenting and a strong sense of claustrophobia. Sadly, I didn't like a single character in this book - not one. Perhaps I wasn't meant to? Neither could I sympathise with any, though others are likely to disagree with me here. Sounds like I'm doing a demolition job but I've given it 3* - the fact that I've bothered to write this much shows it's had an effect on me. Whether I want to repeat the experience is another matter.
Comment Comments (9) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 13, 2013 6:53 PM GMT


Cold Hands
Cold Hands
by John Niven
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £12.99

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A dish best served cold, 2 Aug. 2012
This review is from: Cold Hands (Hardcover)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Difficult book, this - harrowing physically and emotionally but yet rivetting. Ultimately about revenge - don't skip past the Shakespeare quote on the fly leaf. I'm not going to talk about the story as it would spoil it - begins in Canada with a happy and affluent ex-Scot who seems to have landed on his feet. However, even on the first page, it becomes clear he's talking to a doctor, so clearly something's wrong. I found Niven's style excellent - the book is well-written [though teenage boys are given to colourful language!]. More than anything though, I found it asked questions of the reader - predominantly where do your sympathies lie? He appears, to me, to leave the question open as I think a writer should. I think it's a very thought-provoking book and I recommend it highly, though don't buy it as a poolside holiday read!


The Imperial Banner: Agent of Rome 2
The Imperial Banner: Agent of Rome 2
by Nick Brown
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £14.94

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good, but be careful, 31 July 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Having enjoyed The Siege very much I'm glad this sequel avoided the dreaded 'second novel blip'. On the whole, I enjoyed it very much and will be back for more. I rate Brown highly in what's become something of a cut-throat field [pardon pun]. For what it's worth, I don't like Sidebottom, Riches is OK and Scarrow, mmm - certainly used to be excellent. Only other one I rave about is Robert Fabbri [Vespasian]. Certain differences here, I think, from previous novel, hence my caveat above. Story is fine, action moves on well, it's well-written but I was less happy with the characters. Cassius this time , for me, was a rather pompous prig and after a superb introduction, I didn't like Brown's treatment of Indavara as something of a bumbling idiot. Perhaps there's more to come - I certainly hope so, as there's room for development [which is possibly what he has in mind?]. Maybe got a bit complex towards the end [who was doing what to whom] but I did enjoy it. Strange to think that all this was going on in 270 AD in what is modern Syria. Plus ca change..............


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20