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Decision Points
Decision Points
by George W. Bush
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 18.58

12 of 28 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Crocodile tears and What He Does Not Say, 2 Feb 2011
This review is from: Decision Points (Hardcover)
Bush's own actions belie the claim that he felt remorse for sending Americans to war under false pretenses:

"No one was more shocked or angry than I was when we didn't find the weapons. I had a sickening feeling every time I thought about it. I still do," writes Bush.

A sickening feeling every time he thought about it? Really? Let's recall March 24, 2004. Washington's political and media elite had gathered at the Washington Hilton for the annual Radio and Television Correspondents' Association Dinner. As thousands of DC's moneyed establishment swells enjoyed their elegant meal, Bush was the entertainment. Bush displayed a photo of himself looking for something out a window in the Oval Office. His narration: "Those weapons of mass destruction have got to be somewhere." The audience laughed. But the joke wasn't done. After a few more slides, there was a shot of Bush looking under furniture in the Oval Office. "Nope," he said. "No weapons over there." More laughter. Then another picture of Bush searching in his office: "Maybe under here." Laughter again.

In joking about the missing weapons of mass destruction, Bush made fun of the reason he had cited for sending Americans to war and thus to death, traumatic brain injury, post-traumatic stress and maiming, turning his stupid blunder into a running gag.

What He Does Not Say:

Bush was the man in charge the day terrorists attacked the United States on 9/11. He had been warned in Presidential Daily Briefings in August that Bin Laden intended to attack US.
Draw your own conclusions about the effectiveness of Bush in protecting the United States before 9/11.

Bush emphatically assured the American people that the war in Iraq increased national security. Many conservatives believed and still believe that, even though the 9/11 Commission (which the Administration did not want to convene) showed no link between Iraq and al Qaida, and no link between Iraq and 9/11.

Nor does the book discuss the National Intelligence Estimates that showed that the US occupation of Iraq served to recruit and train jihadists, thus decreasing national security.

Bush also, though masquerading as a fiscal conservative, ballooned the national debt by slashing taxes on the rich and the energy industry while increasing defense spending. In fact. he was the first president foolish enough to cut taxes in wartime, the most fiscally foolish thing he could do. in fairness, His fiscal policies benefited the richest two percent.

Don't expect to find anything in this book about how the gap between the incomes of rich and poor has seriously widened in the Reagan and Bush years. And the percentage of poor Americans has seriously increased. This data is available to readers of the national weekly news magazines or even readers of USA Today---but not to readers of this book. Bush favored big business and especially big oil at the expense of the working and middle class, who have to pay interest on his bloated deficit.

Interesting that no conservative groundswell against deficits occurred until Obama became president.

Since his sympathies are always with the rich and wealthy corporations, he provided a drug program for the elderly that has no bulk purchasing for their meds, which would drive down their costs but also drive down the profits of big pharma.

He sponsored an energy bill with no conservation measures. And compromised protections of forests, water, and air quality--cynically calling these anti-conservationist measures Healthy Forests and Clean Air.

Again as an anti-conservative, Bush expanded presidential power at the expense of the US Constitution. For 750 bills he signed, he used the signing statement reservation by which he exempts himself and his Administration from the will of Congress. All previous presidents combined used fewer than 350 signing statements. Bush thus set the all-time record of contempt for Congress as he centralized power in the executive branch, contrary to conservative principles.

All of these facts will greatly offend those suffering from BAD: Bush Adoration Disorder (an all too common affliction in the States, a deeply misled bunch.
Comment Comments (9) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 23, 2013 7:44 AM BST


The Discovery of France
The Discovery of France
by Graham Robb
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.99

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Too much of a good thing, 8 Sep 2010
Much of the book is extraordinarily interesting, but Robb keeps reinforcing points already made with excessive detail. A good editor would have helped. This would be a better book if it were one-third shorter.


Hitch 22: A Memoir
Hitch 22: A Memoir
by Christopher Hitchens
Edition: Hardcover

5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good in parts., 30 Jun 2010
This review is from: Hitch 22: A Memoir (Hardcover)
This is a book to be sampled, not read through. At times H can be quite interesting, but he is never far from sinking into lengthy discussions of his political views and how they have changed. The book is in places, even some entire chapters, entertaining despite the frequent longueurs.


A Genius for War: A Life of General George S. Patton
A Genius for War: A Life of General George S. Patton
by Carlo D' Este
Edition: Paperback

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Exhaustive and finally exhausting, 6 May 2009
D'Este prefers telling all the anecdotes to the telling anecdote. After a while, too many stories were too much for me.


Paths of Glory
Paths of Glory
by Jeffrey Archer
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 18.80

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars John Masters did it better, 4 May 2009
This review is from: Paths of Glory (Hardcover)
in Far, Far the Mountain Peak. Masters is streets ahead of Archer in his depictions of mountain climbing in the Himalaya, the Great War, and the Raj. Archer does a solid job, but Masters is brilliant.


On The Edge
On The Edge
by Edward St Aubyn
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.59

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Style and satire, 6 Nov 2008
This review is from: On The Edge (Paperback)
The book's strengths lie in the brilliance of its style and its acute satire of new age phenomena such as Findhorn and Esalen. Its primary shortcoming is that much of it reads as expository prose rather than as fiction. Satire and style triumph over character development, squelching whatever interest the reader may have had in the people in the novel.


Left in Dark Times
Left in Dark Times
by Bernard-Henri Levy
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A book for Francophiles, 19 Sep 2008
This review is from: Left in Dark Times (Hardcover)
Beginning with a long story about BHL and Sarkozy, this book is clearly intended for an audience greatly interested in French politics and its filiations with French intellectuals. Not all that many outside France are likely to be entranced by pages about Segolene Royal, Chirac, and Mitterand or remarks about other French politicians. Those at universities whose business is theory may find his remarks on anti-Semitism and Islamic fascism of some use. .


The Green Berets [DVD] [1968]
The Green Berets [DVD] [1968]
Dvd ~ John Wayne
Price: 3.58

4 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A silly movie, still good for a laugh, 2 Sep 2008
Wayne avoided military service during World War Two, and it shows in the movie. For example, Wayne repeatedly uses his rifle to gesture toward someone, a flagrant mistake that a recruit with one week of training would not make. Appropriately, at the movie's end the sun sinks in the east as Wayne and a Vietnamese child gaze out to sea. The movie's grasp of the war in Vietnam is as confused as its grasp of geography.


Tolkien: A Biography
Tolkien: A Biography
by Michael White
Edition: Paperback

0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Michael White's misunderstandings, 28 Aug 2008
This review is from: Tolkien: A Biography (Paperback)
White frequently attempts to make vivid and interesting things he knows nothing about. Thus, he describes Tolkien's gruelling introductory training in the British army and the intense preparatory training for trench warfare at Etaples as "idle time." He also writes that at Etaples, soldiers had little to worry about aside from mines and snipers. In fact, Etaples was so far from the front that neither of these endangered the troops there. White, moreover, describes soldiers greasing their bayonets as they moved in trains toward the fighting. In fact, the bayonets were oiled. Some reading of the standard British Great War memoirs by Sassoon and Graves, who served in the trenches, would have kept White from his egregious mistakes.


Surreal Lives: The Surrealists 1917-1945
Surreal Lives: The Surrealists 1917-1945
by Ruth Brandon
Edition: Paperback

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars a fascinating narrative, though rife with errors, 17 July 2008
If the author could be more careful with facts, I for one would welcome a second edition, because I enjoyed the first one so much, despite the howlers.


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