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C. Young "Cefer" (UK)
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Anton Can Do Magic
Anton Can Do Magic
by Ole Konnecke
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Adorable and funny!, 13 Mar 2013
This review is from: Anton Can Do Magic (Paperback)
I bought this book for my two-year old daughter. It is a smash hit! Very amusing for parents as well, but not in a smart-alec, too-knowing manner. My daughter loves the pictues (she doesn't like books with textures/buttons, oddly enough).

I have found that Gecko Press produce beautiful books for children, choosing books from around the world, with emphasis on great illustration and production (no, I don't work for them at all!).


I Never Knew That About England
I Never Knew That About England
by Christopher Winn
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 7.69

2.0 out of 5 stars Constrained content - needs more depth, 5 Jan 2012
I thoroughly enjoyed 'I didn't know that about London' (reviewed on Amazon in 2008) and the more recent 'I didn't know that about the River Thames'. However I have found both 'I never knew that about England' and 'I never knew that about Scotland' rather more disappointing volumes, so much so that I cannot be bothered to read the editions about Wales and Ireland (I object to the format - not the topics!). In my opinion the problem is this: they have created volumes on the home nations to fit a format that is almost identical to that of the volumes that cover much smaller areas. Actually these larger areas need more time and pages dedicated to gathering and presenting stuff that readers genuinely, proverbially didn't know. It is disappointing and a little boring to find only a few pages on a particular area and read on to find that well, I did know that, actually! The lack of depth ruins a serendipitous journey of discovery which made other editions in this series so special.

I suspect the author doesn't know as much about the rest of the UK as he does about London and the south-east, and he has not been given the time to go and properly research this to find more interesting information (perhaps pushed by eager publishing/marketing schedules and constrained by a prescribed format). I just feel that this is a missed opportunity: the concept and style is handsome; an eager, post-Christmas audience is there ready to be entertained by a subject they feel strongly about. These could have been bigger and more interesting volumes and the publisher could have sold them for more money. Any smart reader accepts that England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales are bigger undertakings than the south-east corner. Now this feels like a format spread too thinly - what a shame!


I Never Knew That About London
I Never Knew That About London
by Christopher Winn
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 6.99

23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, but let down by a few errors, 25 Oct 2009
I really enjoyed this, and came away with a renewed appreciation of London. It has made a wonderful gift. The illustrations are really beautiful and refreshingly unfaddish - the format is attractive and timeless.

I must have received an early edition - there were a few layout and formatting errors, but it is the very few factual errors which could have actually potentially undermined this concept. IE; I am sure Mick Jagger did not live with Marianne Faithful until 1978; also I query whether Steve Marriott formed the Faces with Ronnie Wood - I thought Ronnie Lane did after Marriott's departure from the Small Faces. However, I feel I little churlish - the rest is so beautifully done and accurate (as far as I can guess), so I concluded the author wasn't a great fan of rock music!
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 9, 2013 5:56 PM GMT


A Steroid Hit The Earth: A Celebration of Misprints, Typos and other Howlers
A Steroid Hit The Earth: A Celebration of Misprints, Typos and other Howlers
by Martin Toseland
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My copy has vanished. Please return, 27 Jun 2009
Editors and writers world over can rejoice: this book proves that someone else, in some other office, has made a bigger print gaff than them. These misprints bristle with an undercurrent of confused leads, pressing deadlines and desperate hacks trying to make tedious topics newsworthy. My copy of this book has been pored over by colleagues and cheered up many a frazzled soul. It disappeared from my shelf 2 months ago, I guess it was too popular.


The National Gallery in Wartime (National Gallery London)
The National Gallery in Wartime (National Gallery London)
by S Bosman
Edition: Paperback
Price: 12.62

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great art and fantastic photography evoke London's finest hour, 29 Oct 2008
Really, truly, you don't need to be an art fan to love this book. It is a fantastic read for people who have an interest in modern history, photography and, dare I say, nostalgia as well.

This book is ripe with beautifully chosen illustrations - these fab pics are allowed to rule. The text, enjoyable and starightforward, guide you through the images - which are always the star.

From secretive trips to north Wales to mesmerising concerts by Myra Hess, this is a rewarding journey!


A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian
A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian
by Marina Lewycka
Edition: Paperback

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Ignore the 'comedy' hype - read and enjoy!, 29 May 2007
I agree the book's publicity as some kind of uproarious giggle-fest are somewhat wide of the mark. However, this was the first book I had read for some time that genuinely drew me in for hours - there are some very funny moments in this book, but more notably I was also eager to find out how this spectacular family predicament was resolved. What this book does really well is keep you reading, keep you interested in the characters and what they will do next.

It is also deeply poignant, and will certainly strike a chord with anyone who is wrestling with the frustrations worrying about for elderly relatives, while trying to be mindful of their right to be independent.


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