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Galápagos
Galápagos
Price: £6.34

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Galapogo, 15 Oct. 2013
This review is from: Galápagos (Kindle Edition)
It's really difficult to see what someone not already familiar with Vonnegut will get out of this novel.

The characters are weak, cliched and very mono faceted. Every character exists only to advance a part of the narrative, with barely believable reasons for existing.

The plot is badly contrived and not even remotely developed. Very little exploration of the narrator's experience is detailed and he seems stuck on as a pure story telling device rather than a supposedly experienced observer.

This reads like someone found the author's notes and stuck them together as a book.

Thoroughly disappointing and a sad way for a genius to waste the chance to explore a rich topic.


Kirigami: Flowers Bk. 3: Fun with Paper Folding and Cutting
Kirigami: Flowers Bk. 3: Fun with Paper Folding and Cutting
by Joyce Hwang
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Paper folding paradise, 17 Aug. 2007
This kirigami pack provides you with pictures of the finished project and the basic templates, as well as some paper to start. The book initially seems limited and brief, but can actually be adapted to suit the strengths of the client.

This art is often pitched as being harder than origami or tissue-art, but the designs at this level have an element of simplicity itself. This book is set at level 3, with designs that can be followed and adapted quite easily. Once a client can achieve a basic 'sandwich' fold, they can be directed to copy a design or do the cutting free hand and see what comes out.

This art can look stunning on cards and montages, but you must be careful not to overload clients that have issues with confusion or cognition. Thankfully, the simplicity of designs at this level means that one can demonstrate and assist in the making of a project even if you are not very experienced yourself, unlike many other art activities which can require a deft hand or knowledge of materials.

Clients with motor-deficits will find the cutting quite hard, but may still be engaged with the mounting of finished designs onto montages/cards.

Overall: brief at first, but with potential to be adapted for the group type and client base.


The God Delusion
The God Delusion
by Richard Dawkins
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.29

13 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Reviewer Delusion, 17 Aug. 2007
This review is from: The God Delusion (Paperback)
Dawkins once again writes a highly informative book in an accessible and relevant manner. He presents each rebuttal to the main arguements of theism in a logical and ordered manner, taking care each time to not lose the unbiased and interested reader. Each arguement is comprehensively destroyed with heartfelt engagement and skill.

Unfortunetly for Dawkins, he presumes that his reader-base has at least some knowledge of the main modern theistic arguements. There is not a single arguement here that is not repeatedly and widely used amongst people such as Dembski, Haggard, Johnson and Hovind. He neither invents strawman arguements or distorts any.

As evidenced by many negative reviews, far too many people think that if he's not arguing against their particular brand of theism, then he's ignorant and making it up. Make no mistake, these arguements are out there and people do believe them. Ignorance of these arguements is the fault of the reviewer, not of Dawkins.


Tales of Hellbrandt Grimm (Warhammer)
Tales of Hellbrandt Grimm (Warhammer)
by Mitchel Scanlon
Edition: Paperback

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hellbrandt nice-but-grimm, 13 Dec. 2002
Hellbrandt Grimm is a hard-as-nails head-hunter from Games Workshops Warhammer world.
Written and drawn by a series of individuals with thier own styles , TLoHG can seem to be a confusing muddle of ink and letters to those not used to the sectioned style of GW's monthly comics.
However , once you settle into the fact that the stories are told from various perspectives (such as victim , employer , gossip-monger, witness and scribe) the cacophony of styles settles down into much more harmonised read.
The artwork itself is varied , with each artist having thier own strength and weaknesses , such as perspective or consistancy. Several fables are similar in style , giving the book a more consistant feel , but unfortunetly making the more individual styles stick out uncomfortably.
Overall , it's very hard to reccommend to anyone not into WH , but should count as a definate for fanatics and hobbyists alike.


Titan ("Warhammer Monthly" Presents)
Titan ("Warhammer Monthly" Presents)
by Dan Abnett
Edition: Paperback

3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not quite a Titan amongst comics., 11 Aug. 2002
Taken from the pages of the award winning Warhammer Monthly , Titan book I introduces us to the two main stars of the series - Princeps Cadet Ervin Hekate - a wet behind the implant final year student forced into the Princeps (Captains) Chair during his first observational tour - and Imperious Dictatio - a collosus of metal and malice , with gun barrels you can drive a tank down and its own plasma reactor.
Written by the versatile Dan Abnett (amongst others , he has written for the Punisher and Batman as well as the Mr Men and Rupert the Bear!!) Titan offers an interesting look into these devestating war machines of the Warhammer 40,000 universe ; dealing with neural links , empathic wounding and even the possibility of such complex machines developing souls.
Unfortunetly , as good as the storyline is , the artwork stops me from giving the book 5 stars. The work by former Batman artists Anthony Williams and Andy Lanning falls somewhere between the smoothness of Bloodquest II and the forced angular nature of Inquisitor and is excellent throughout most parts , with each scene chock-a-block with detail and nice touches , but the facial expressions in some parts are just too ridiculous for my taste.
Still, this book is a definite recommendation for fans of WH40k and may also suit many Battletech fans , as well as lovers of walking metal maelstroms in general , but may prove confusing for newbies to the 40k universe.


Inquisitor Ascendant Book 1 ("Warhammer Monthly" Presents)
Inquisitor Ascendant Book 1 ("Warhammer Monthly" Presents)
by Dan Abnett
Edition: Paperback

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Inquizzical?? Then read this...., 4 July 2002
Culled from the pages of Warhammer Monthly , the deliberately angular style and heavy lining nicely conveys the dark and gothic nature of the future human empire of Games Workshops Warhammer 40,000 (AD) universe.
Rain swept landscapes , fetid jungles and medieval style manors and castles provide an excellent backdrop to the story of Inquisitor Defay (Witch-hunter style Imperial officer with the authourity to execute those found to have 'incorrect' beliefs) and his student, Gravier.
The story follows the personal account of Gravier, in a series of memories. The story begins with Defay and Gravier being sent to a backwater planet to investigate reports of corruption , however , pretty soon it becomes apparent that the rot goes deeper with Defay and Gravier finding that those they considered thier allies - and even themselves - have dark secrets to hide.


Bloodquest: Bk.1 ("Warhammer Monthly" Presents)
Bloodquest: Bk.1 ("Warhammer Monthly" Presents)
by Gordon Rennie
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good , but not as good as BQII, 4 July 2002
Although graphically inferior to the line-and-wash style of the second book - and the bonus 'Blood Secrets' background story included in the back of the book - Bloodquest I still proves to be an atmospheric tale of the exiled Blood Angel Captain Leonatos and his quest to find a lost Chapter relic.
The storline follows - Leo was a excellent Blood Angels captain - hotly tipped to become Chapter Master after Dante - until he became exiled after losing a Chapter relic. Upon exile , he decides to reclaim this Relic and embarks on a search which takes him to several planets and into the path of corrupt monks and decidely green Orks , as well as the nefarious beings of Chaos.
Throughout the book , it touches on almost all the aspects of the Imperium and WH40K, from Leo and his fellow Exiles helping a backwater Imperial Guard regiment fight off an Ork Waaagh, to Spacehulks and Chaos Marines from The Eye of Terror.
For Space Marines or Imperium fans , this presents a get-it-or-be-Horus-lover buy. For other WH40K fans it still presents an important buy , even if only for it prestige value as one of the first 40k Graphic Novels to come from GW.
If , on the other hand , this is all Imperial Gothic to you , then you might be well advised to avoid unless you love the idea of large muscle men going hammer and tongs with anyone that gets into their path - it requires quite a bit of prior knowledge to really get into and the plotline can easily lose those that have little or no knowledge of WH40K.


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