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Reviews Written by
D. E. Chukwumerije "Author, The Revolution Has No Tribe: Contemporary Poetry on African History, Culture and Society" (London, U.K)
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SHL BRAND ISOPROPANOL IPA Isopropyl Alcohol 99.9% Pure (250ml)
SHL BRAND ISOPROPANOL IPA Isopropyl Alcohol 99.9% Pure (250ml)
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars spilled!, 11 April 2013
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Ordered this product, it arrived on time but when i opened it part of the liquid had spilled into the packaging. It wasn't a huge amount that spilled, but enough to make the whole package stink even before i has completely opened it. Thank goodness it was in a plastic bag inside the envelope so that helped to contain the spillage. would have given 5 stars if not for the spillage.


MAM Trainer Bottle (Pink)
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5.0 out of 5 stars great transition cup, 11 April 2013
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I ordered this cup for my first daughter when trying to get her to switch from bottles to cups and it made the transition easy. So i just reordered for my second daughter who I am now trying to transition to drinking her milk from a beaker. great product!


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5.0 out of 5 stars Wife very pleased!!, 11 April 2013
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My wife was very pleased with this purchase. This palette arrived very well packaged and within the specified time. None of the shadows were damaged. A wonderfully vibrant array of colours. Definitely a great addition to her makeup artist kit.


Black Experience and the Empire (Oxford History of the British Empire Companion Series)
Black Experience and the Empire (Oxford History of the British Empire Companion Series)
by Philip D Morgan
Edition: Paperback
Price: £25.42

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent resource material, 21 Feb 2009
This book contains 14 detailed essays on the socio-cultural, economic and political experiences of black people within the British Empire. The essays address different time spans, ranging from pre-Empire times to post-Empire times. Specific historical events like the slave trade, emancipation, colonialization and de-colonization are examined from the perspective of how black people would have experienced these events. A lot of focus is given to specific categories of black people- like workers, women, the intelligentsia etc, in these examinations. There is also a regional focus on both Africa and the West Indies, showing how blacks distributed across these locations would have experienced the empire. A lot of details are given about socio-cultural, political and economic developments in the various black communities in the empire over time and how these shaped and were shaped by British imperialism. The essays clearly show how there could have been no empire without "the blacks" and, even more interestingly, how there could have been no "the blacks" without the empire. I found this last point particularly intriguing. If the reader reads nothing else, the last essay by Kwame Anthony Appiah is a must.


Central Africans, Atlantic Creoles, and the Foundation of the Americas, 1585-1660: The First Generation of African Americans in North America and the Caribbean, 1619-1660
Central Africans, Atlantic Creoles, and the Foundation of the Americas, 1585-1660: The First Generation of African Americans in North America and the Caribbean, 1619-1660
by Linda M. Heywood
Edition: Paperback
Price: £18.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars very informative, 11 Sep 2008
Essentially, this book establishes that the first wave of Africans to get to colonial North America and the Caribbeans were taken mostly from West Central Africa (what would today be Angola). What I found most useful about it was the insight provided in Chapters 2,3 and 4 about the history and the nature of society in pre-colonial West Central Africa. I've always believed that Africa could have achieved integration with the Europe and the rest of the world, on its own terms and at its own pace, without the need for colonial intervention, and the early interactions between the kingdom of Kongo and Portugal (as described in this book) amongst other details illustrate this point well. I also found Chaper 6 very interesting in the way that it showed that early Africans in America were not regarded as "slaves" in the way we understand the term today, but that the status of the African was denigrated over time due to both racist and economic factors.


Nzingha: Warrior Queen of Matamba (Royal Diaries)
Nzingha: Warrior Queen of Matamba (Royal Diaries)
by Patricia C. McKissack
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars very readable, enjoyable and informative, 7 Sep 2008
There are very few accounts of pre-colonial African societies. There are very few accounts of indigenous African resistance to the trans-Atlantic slave trade. And there are very few accounts of heroic African men, much less women. For all these reasons, this children's book on Queen Nzingha is a gem. I loved every page of it and it left me wishing there was more to read. It is essentially the fictional dairy of a 13 year old Nzingha, a princess of the Ndongo kingdom of modern Angola, written at a time when the Portuguese were beginning to push inland from the coast. It tries to dramatize the factors that were later to cause Nzingha, when she became Queen, to spend over 40 years of her life fighting the Portuguese.


Black Women in Antiq-2nd Ed (S6#1) (Journal of African civilizations)
Black Women in Antiq-2nd Ed (S6#1) (Journal of African civilizations)
by Ivan Van Sertima
Edition: Paperback

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars very informative, 7 Sep 2008
This is an excellent book. It is a collection of essays on several astounding black women in history. Most of the women are drawn from ancient egypt, and include women who ruled Egypt either as regents or as actual Pharoahs. These include well known figures like Hatshepsut and Nerfetiti, as well as less known women like Queen Tiye and Ahmose. Other great women leaders are drawn from places like Ethiopia, Meroe (the Candaces), Angola (Queen Nzingha), Ghana (Yaa Asantewa) and Mauritania (Queen Kahina). Apart from describing the political, economic and military leadership of women in ancient Africa, the book also describes the contributions of women in other areas (social and religious), a great deal of material is devoted to detailing the influence of the black woman on religion and religious art especially. The impact of black women on European culture and society, as well as the advanced nature of the rights of women in ancient Egyptian society are topics that are also covered. Many of the articles are short and easy to read. I thoroughly recommend this book.


Measuring Time
Measuring Time
by Helon Habila
Edition: Paperback
Price: £15.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars an interesting story, 7 Sep 2008
This review is from: Measuring Time (Paperback)
This novel reads like many stories within a single story. It is principally the story of two twins, Mamo and LaMamo, and the different, but intertwining paths, they take in life. However, through the life experiences of the twins, Habila tells the story of poverty, corruption, love, friendship, war, colonialism and lost youth. It is a very human story, that subtly expounds historical and socio-political themes through the lives of ordinary people. At times, I thought the narrative lacked depth (in that I was being told what was happening, rather than being allowed to experience it directly through the characters themselves) and moved a bit too quickly, but it may just be that the writer chose this style because it made it easier to cover a lot of ground. Overall, I liked this novel. It's a sad story, beautifully written, that ends in hope. I recommend it to anyone looking for a good tale.


Honour in African History (African Studies)
Honour in African History (African Studies)
by John Iliffe
Edition: Paperback
Price: £23.35

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars detailed and informative, 25 Jun 2008
This is a very detailed study of African notions of honour and how these can help to explain behaviour within African societies.

The first half of the book studies pre-colonial concepts of honour and the impacts of christianity (in Ethiopia) and Islam (in West Africa) on traditional concepts of honour and behaviour. Honour traditions in central and southern Africa are also examined, in stateless societies, amongst women, householders and slaves. Different "strains" of honour are analysed- military heroism, moral virtue, fulfilment of civic duty etc.

In the second part of the book, the impact of colonial conquest on these pre-existing notions of honour is examined. The fragmentation of African concepts of honour by colonial conquest is used to explain modern African behaviour, with emphasis on how heroic traditions have survived in such modern concepts as professionalism, respectability and dignity in the face of AIDS.

This is a difficult book to read- mainly because of its subject matter. However, it is a worthwhile read for the insight it provides into a significant element of the African value system. I found it most useful, however, for the historical information littered through its many pages.


The African Origin of Civilization: Myth or Reality?
The African Origin of Civilization: Myth or Reality?
by Cheikh Anta Diop
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.37

20 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars detailed analysis of the racial identity of ancient Egyptians, 23 Jun 2008
One of the most recognized images of our generation is that of the white-skinned ancient Egyptian. This is how ancient Egyptians have been consistently portrayed in movies, documentaries and books. Diop sets out to show that this image of ancient Egyptians as white is a false one, constructed in the racist climate of the early nineteenth century by European scholars.

In the first six chapters of the book, he carefully considers the reasoning and arguments of a selection of Egyptologists and shows why their theories were wrong. He produces clear historical evidence to show that, up till the falsification of egyptian history in the nineteenth century, it was taken for granted that ancient Egyptians were black. He cites noted Greek and Roman historians and also supplies scientific evidence to back his assertion. He goes further to show that the origins of ancient Epypt actually lay in Sudan (Upper Egypt), in the heart of Black Africa, and not in Mesoptamia or Asia as claimed by European scholars.

In the second part of his book, Diop builds a strong argument for the black origins of ancient Egypt by detailing strong similarities in socio-cultural and political institutions between Egypt and the rest of Africa. He argues that all of Africa was, in fact, populated from Egypt and that, up till the coming of Europeans to sub-saharan Africa in the fifteenth century, many features of Egyptian civilization had survived in the interior in places like Ghana, Mali, Songhay, Yatenga, Cayor and Great Zimbabwe (all pre-European contact African civilizations). Therefore, the theory of "black barbarism" was infact a myth. He explains that African civilizations suffered a severe cultural reversion as a result of colonialism, which is why it is hard, today, to link African peoples to the former glories of ancient Egypt.

Diop's book is a radical but objective and very credible interpretation of historical, scientific and sociological facts and a bold attempt to provide a clearer picture of African history. Books like "Black Athena" (by Martin Bernal) and "The Destruction of Black Civilization" (by Chancellor Williams) are a good complement to this book.


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