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George Connor (The Remote Parts of, Scotland)

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Sho'Nuff
Sho'Nuff

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A rarer and rarer commodity., 23 Sep 2000
This review is from: Sho'Nuff (Audio CD)
This is a decade's work and, consequently, it's difficult to pin down the best of these five CDs. What should be understood from the beginning is that blues-laden, southern-tinged rock and roll of this quality is becoming rarer and rarer and should be cherished while we have it.
The first two records set the BC stall out in the early nineties as an ultra-acomplished outfit. Their brand of danceable seventies rock earned a number of hits at a time when the misery and woe of grunge was at its height. No mean accomplishment.
However, their subsequent records (Amorica and Three Snakes) were less successful and the band's profile dived. We should look at these records, though, as genuine innovations in blues playing adn Robinson's lyrical contribution is never less than stunning. These records were less immediate, for sure, but the quality on show is undeniable.
Their fifth record By Your Side was a return to more overt rock and roll traditions and their name is now being mixed with those of the Allman Brothers, Aerosmith and, naturally, the Rolling Stones thanks to their recent collaboration with Jimmy Page.
Their earler works, and the extra rare additions to this box set, are essential items for any rock and roll collection. In time they will be apreciated more fully, and more deservingly, as the last great rock and roll band of the twentieth century.


Endless, Nameless
Endless, Nameless
Offered by westworld-
Price: £10.03

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply., 12 July 2000
This review is from: Endless, Nameless (Audio CD)
Quite simply, the Wildhearts were the most inventive rock band to spring from the 1990s.
And, quite simply, this is the best thing they did.
It's unique and abrasive. Lots of fans hated it.
It's an argument against complacent "dad-rock" that came to prominence with Oasis and Paul Weller.
Your parents would hate this.
Bask in it's freakishness.


On Overgrown Paths (Green Integer Books)
On Overgrown Paths (Green Integer Books)
by Knut Hamsun
Edition: Paperback

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A final return., 27 Jun 2000
As Hamsun's final work this apologia is a fitting conclusion. It shows a return to the narrative style of his first novels Hunger, Mysteries and Pan. He shies away from the pic pastoral that made him famous in the twenties and thirties, choosing his most personal, illogical and, ultimately, beautiful voice to explain himself. In the wake of his arrest for nazi sympathies he fights with reason against the judgement that his mental faculties are impaired. The book alone disproves this slipshod ruling. Ultimately, though, for a fan of Hamsun it is amongst his very best. Showing an omnipotence that is at the same time immensely personal he was able to place himself historically, rather than be caught up in the zealous misunderstandings of the immediate postwar.
He remains one of the finest writers of the twentieth century. His refusal to conform makes him an example of the individual who Camus and Kafka were to adore. He was not about nazism, he was about the individual. Nobody has written like him since.


I Got Dem Ol'kozmic Blues
I Got Dem Ol'kozmic Blues
Offered by playanywhere
Price: £11.94

9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Janis-lite?, 15 Jun 2000
Whenever people talk of Janis's three studio albums this one always gets its wrists slapped. It is such a departure from Cheap Thrills that the purists/snobs were never going to give it a chance.
However, this record is packed with great, sassy songs and in the change of style you can hear her transition from the early Janis into the later Pearl.
If Aretha Franklin or Tina Turner had put this record out it would have been hailed as a classic, but because it was straight-ahead funk/soul it's unsurprising that it disappointed the psychedelic crowd who had given her her first break.
Good As You've Been To This World is amongst the best things Joplin ever recorded, and Little Girl Blue is potentially her very finest work.
It's different, yes. But it's a stunning soul record in its own right.


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