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Dagna Gaythorpe (Dovercourt, Essex, United Kingdom)
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The Data Model Resource Book: A Library of Universal Data Models by Industry Types: v. 2
The Data Model Resource Book: A Library of Universal Data Models by Industry Types: v. 2
by Len Silverston
Edition: Paperback
Price: £34.23

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Is it worth buying a book for only one chapter?, 15 Feb. 2005
Yes, it is. Because the other chapters have all sorts of useful content as well. This book covers Manufacturing, Telecommunications, Health Care, Insurance, Financial Services, Professional Services, Travel, and e-Commerce. Most companies, even if they aren't in those sectors, use the services of companies that are (or may do a little bit of them - offer insurance on their products, for example), and if you need to include these areas in your model, in more detail than was covered in volume 1 (the core Universal Data Model book), then this is the place to start. If you are in one of these areas, then the specific chapter has a lot of useful stuff (I have worked in Travel, Telecommunications and Professional Services), but it is well worth checking out the other models for ideas that can be re-used in your area.


The Data Model Resource Book: v. 1: A Library of Universal Data Models for All Enterprises: Vol 1
The Data Model Resource Book: v. 1: A Library of Universal Data Models for All Enterprises: Vol 1
by Len Silverston
Edition: Paperback
Price: £32.71

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars There's more to this than a set of models, 15 Feb. 2005
You might be tempted (as I was, at first) to just dip into this book and use it as a source of patterns for producing data models. And if you do that, then you will find some very useful patterns as well as saving a lot of time. But that would be a shame, because by starting at the beginning and reading the whole book, I found that as well as a very comprehensive, rigourous and coherent set of models, I also got an understanding of the underlying structures and approach. And this approach has proved to be extremely useful when dealing with any new data structures. Someone described this as 'the second data modelling book you should buy', and I agree with that.


Data Modeling Essentials (The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Data Management Systems)
Data Modeling Essentials (The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Data Management Systems)
by Graeme C. Simsion
Edition: Paperback
Price: £44.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Much more than just a new cover, 31 Jan. 2005
Even if you already own the second edition, you should buy the third (or get your employers to buy it for you). (Putting this first for those people who don't want to read the whole review).
I already owned the second edition - it is the most frequently borrowed book from the set that I keep on my desk. So why did I buy the new edition as soon as I could? Because it is new, and covers new stuff - like sixth normal form (which turned out to be very familiar), and the Object Class Hierarchy, which is the answer to a Corporate/Enterprise Data/Information Architect/Administrator's prayer (job title generator - for each pair, pick one - the titles may vary, but the job seems to stay the same!) After years of developing web pages, spreadsheets and documents, and trying to get people to use them, this structure finally brings it all together.
It is tempting to dip into a book like this to look things up, or to explain something to someone else (it is very handy if someone wants to know what, exactly, you mean by 'fifth normal form' - just hand them the book open at the relevent section). But if you don't read the whole thing, then you risk missing all sorts of useful stuff that gets mentioned in passing (sometimes a passing remark, sometimes getting as much as a whole paragraph). For example, there is a very useful question to elicit important information from senior management, in chapter 10. (Go and read the book to find it!)
I think that the chapter on Enterprise Data Management needs expanding. Preferably into a companion volume ('Enterprise Data Management Essentials' - any chance, gentlemen?) But that is just about my only caveat.
The second edition is still the most frequently borrowed book on my desk - but only because I don't let this one out of my sight, and I have been making people buy their own copies.
If you buy the book and disagree with me - feel free to come and tell me why at any DAMA conference!


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