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Maggie (UK)
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Cath Kidston: The Collection (Sew! Stitch! and Patch!)
Cath Kidston: The Collection (Sew! Stitch! and Patch!)
by Cath Kidston
Edition: Paperback
Price: £27.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Really nice set, 5 Dec. 2012
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Good to have three of Cath Kidston's books all in one case, although once you take out the included kit there is obviously a gap in the slip case! The books are what you would expect and have some good ideas for sewing. Would make a good gift for anyone who admires her style and the projects are not really diffcult.


Merry Christmas, Alex Cross: (Alex Cross 19)
Merry Christmas, Alex Cross: (Alex Cross 19)
by James Patterson
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £18.99

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It's Alex Cross but not at his best, 1 Dec. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Having been an Alex Cross fan from day zero, I am always excited when the next book appears but lately have been disappointed, as I do feel that James Patterson is throwing out money-making "product" with little of the care he used to devote to his various character streams. That said, this one is much better than the last two Alex Cross novels. The main story, once you get to it, is almost as good as early Alex Cross, full of suspense and interesting characters. The initial chapters, however, are wasted on a puny sub-plot that bears no relation to the main storyline. Bring back the truly evil characters such as Kyle Craig, Gary Soneji etc. If you are new to Alex Cross do read the earlier books which are so much better.


Moon Underfoot (A Jake Crosby Thriller)
Moon Underfoot (A Jake Crosby Thriller)
by Bobby Cole
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.64

8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars far-fetched maybe but a very good read!, 17 Nov. 2012
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I thoroughly enjoyed Bobby Cole's debut novel featuring Jake Crosby's adventures so was glad to find the sequel. Again it is a really good read, although Jake himself seems somewhat subdued in this book. There is a rather far-fetched and occasionally comic plot centred around four old people which I won't describe so as not to spoil it for others. Suffice to say their actions put them in severe danger of getting tangled up with some very nasty criminals! The writing is clear and pleasingly grammatical, except for one word that seems to crop up in every American novel recently and which really annoys me - "normalcy". What's that about? There is a perfectly good English word "normality". The characters are generally engaging and the southern setting provides an interesting backdrop, although this one is less about the wilderness than the first novel. The final chapter, or epilogue, is a little bit twee but it does close off nicely without leaving any loose ends. I can't imagine a further sequel about this set of characters but would certainly read this author again.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 15, 2013 10:34 AM GMT


Emotional Intelligence in Action: Training and Coaching Activities for Leaders, Managers, and Teams
Emotional Intelligence in Action: Training and Coaching Activities for Leaders, Managers, and Teams
by Marcia Hughes
Edition: Paperback
Price: £35.99

2.0 out of 5 stars Not for the real world, 15 Nov. 2012
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I'll start by saying that as a business consultant for over 20 years I have designed many programmes aimed at improving employee engagement, team working and leadership. However, there is a real world out there where Emotional Intelligence is the last thing on the minds of business managers or their employees. I have always eschewed the soft, "psychobabble" approach (as another reviewer has tagged this)and focused on the real issues and problems that organisations need to deal with. I have also delivered a lot of consultancy to the public sector and in my experience they are the only sector who can afford the luxury of implementing this kind of approach. This may be sad but it's the reality. This does not mean that we all should not strive for empathy and collaboration in the workplace. However, while the principles are worthy the practice, as detailed here, is unrealistic.


Carry the One
Carry the One
by Carol Anshaw
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

2 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Could not get into this, 15 Nov. 2012
This review is from: Carry the One (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Just lately I have come to a point where, if a book cannot engage me in the first few pages, I no longer waste time on it. This may be a pity and it may be that this novel is worth reading, but it failed my test and has therefore been consigned to oblivion. I am a very busy person looking for the occasional easy but gripping distraction and this didn't cut it.


Eye Contact (Inspector Harland 1)
Eye Contact (Inspector Harland 1)
by Fergus McNeill
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting idea and a good read, 15 Nov. 2012
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
A good detective thriller with an interesting premise at its heart - the untraceable murderer who has no connection to his victims. Set in England in recognisable places which I always think is a bonus. Always a driven detective with a tragic back story is deemed necessary, I sometimes wonder if any of them are normal and happy in real life! But I did enjoy the read and would certainly buy further books in this series, of which I believe this is a first.


The Camera Killer
The Camera Killer
by Thomas Glavinic
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.94

3.0 out of 5 stars A clever book but cannot say I like it so three stars only, 19 Oct. 2012
This review is from: The Camera Killer (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
A chilling book, translated masterfully from the original and thus preserving the coldness and detachment that are an essential element of the work. The compelling nature of the story is such that you want to "look away" but find you cannot. And this is the essence of the book: how we cannot look away and hunger for more and more news coverage of tragic events, in a most horribly voyeuristic way. This is taken to the extreme here, with actual video of the wicked torture and murder of two small boys filmed by the killer and then shown on television - hard to believe this could happen and yet are we that far from it? So the author might exaggerate for effect but it fulfils his purpose. The morbid fascination is not far from what compels us to watch 24 hour news of events such as 9/11 and suchlike. The book is dry, impersonal and completely unemotional in style, with no direct speech, and the ending should not come as the surprise that it does - but we are lulled into a state of thinking that it couldn't possibly be that, could it?


The Wowzer
The Wowzer
by Frank Wheeler Jr.
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.64

1.0 out of 5 stars Didn't get very far, 13 Oct. 2012
This review is from: The Wowzer (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
There was a time when I felt guilty if I didn't finish a book. Nowadays I realise that my time is too precious to waste on a book I don't like. I could not bear the affectations of the first person narration and the dialogue. I gave up very quickly on this.


Dangerous Waters (The Barkley Sound Series)
Dangerous Waters (The Barkley Sound Series)
by Toni Anderson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.64

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable - grows on you, 13 Oct. 2012
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
It took me a while to get into this book and I found I could take it or leave it in the early chapters but persevered and the pace does improve considerably. It is badged as a romantic thriller, which seems to be a growing genre, and there's quite a bit of sex in it with, naturally, beautiful people! The Canadian wilderness setting is a little oppressive, it feels as if it's always grey and slightly sinister, although I'm sure if I re-read it I would find plenty of evidence that it's bright and sunny. There's a good twist at the end, which I only half expected, and overall it is a good undemanding read.


Wool (Wool Trilogy 1)
Wool (Wool Trilogy 1)
by Hugh Howey
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £9.98

9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The dystopian novels I've been waiting for, 5 Oct. 2012
This review is from: Wool (Wool Trilogy 1) (Hardcover)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
A genre I cannot resist, but which has often disappointed recently. Not this, however. It appears that this series of five books has been published before but is set for a re-launch in 2013, so it came to my attention through the Vine progamme and I am so glad it did. Presentationally this version was inspired, coming as five separate volumes in stark covers, held together with a paper band. It should have been a gift ribbon! I hope this is the binding that will go on general sale next year as it's impressive. Each volume is progressively thicker, the first just whets the appetite and then you cannot wait to move on through the other four. I do wish though that I hadn't finished yet - it's one of those books (or technically five books) that you don't want to end.

It's a whole world in microcosm, brilliantly imagined and well written. It's the sort of world we probably envisage would develop if one day planet earth became hostile and mankind had time to plan an alternative existence. As in many fictional dystopian existences, humankind is deprived of what many of us think makes life on this planet worthwhile - the sun, the beauties of nature, the open air, freedom. However, being human, these people find a way to live that allows them to learn, work, play, love, mostly in peace and, if not happiness, then contentment. Provided they don't get curious about the outside world or the history of their existence, all is fine. Again though, being human, this lack of curiousity is not going to hold and some will always want to extend the boundaries and explore the truth. That's what this series is built around. There are characters you can care about, fascinating detail about their way of life (although I wasn't too sure about the accuracy of some of the science, particularly around radios)and a gripping tale of courage and ingenuity against the odds. There are echoes, inevitably, of previous science fiction works, but I did not find this distracted from a very accomplished piece of writing. Having now just discovered that there is a prequel, I'm off to read it on my Kindle immediately.


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