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A. Stephens "andystep19" (london, UK)
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Remington HC5356 Pro Power Hair Clipper and Detail Trimmer
Remington HC5356 Pro Power Hair Clipper and Detail Trimmer
Offered by No1Brands4You
Price: £28.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Almost useless. The guards just clog up with hair meaning ..., 30 Jun. 2014
Almost useless. The guards just clog up with hair meaning you have to stop to brush it out every few strokes. I use the shortest which is not comparable to other number 3's...

Will ditch and buy something else with proper guards...


Swees 4GB MP3 Player with FM Radio - Blue
Swees 4GB MP3 Player with FM Radio - Blue

2.0 out of 5 stars Pretty useless but you get what you pay for..., 15 Dec. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
No instructions, fiddly to download tracks and it can't handle folders so you have to click through how ever many tracks you have on the device to get to what you want. Doesn't store things in order either. Should just have spent double and got something more user friendly!


Levi's Men's 506 Straight Jeans, Dark Stuff, W30/L30
Levi's Men's 506 Straight Jeans, Dark Stuff, W30/L30

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Returned immediately..., 8 Dec. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I ordered exactly the same style, size and colour as my current pair that sadly need replacing but what arrived was completely different. The quality of material was poor, they felt half as thick and almost like chinos. The 'Dark Stuff' colour was quite a bright blue and the bright golden stitching looked poor. I can't believe these were genuine Levi's...


Americanah
Americanah
by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Edition: Hardcover

5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Americanah" - A story of love & identity across three continents..., 13 April 2013
This review is from: Americanah (Hardcover)
I have waited a long time for Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's third novel and wasn't disappointed. It is quite different from from her first two novels but brilliant in its own way.

It is almost like a modern day 'Love in the Time of Cholera', a love story between Ifemelu and Obinze starting in high school, then on hold as they end up in the US and UK respectively, and ending back in Nigeria. The way that race and identity is dealt with in the novel is fascinating and the issues weave in and out of the story line. Speaking of weaving, there's a lot of talk about hair too.

There is even a reference to horse meat being used in burgers near the end (coincidence?) which made me laugh given the recent scandal across Europe.

Interesting structure that makes it hard to put down. Highly recommended...


1Q84: Book 3
1Q84: Book 3
by Haruki Murakami
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Wish I'd stopped after Books 1 & 2..., 23 May 2012
This review is from: 1Q84: Book 3 (Hardcover)
Hugely repetitive, Book 3 of 1Q84 should have been condensed down into a few chapters and tacked on to the end of the first two books. Nothing really happens for the first half, then it resolves slowly in a fairly predictable manner but leaving many questions unresolved.

Overall, I felt it was trying too hard to be a lengthy 'classic'...


Half of a Yellow Sun
Half of a Yellow Sun
by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Edition: Hardcover

168 of 176 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gripping plot, powerful themes, excellent..., 25 Sept. 2006
This review is from: Half of a Yellow Sun (Hardcover)
`Half of A Yellow Sun' confirms Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie as one of my favourite authors. Following up a very successful first novel is always difficult but this is exceptional writing.

While tackling a difficult subject, the lead up to and the course of Nigeria's Biafra War in the 1960's, it is told in a very readable and accessible way. The events unfold through the eyes of three central characters who are swept along in the chaos of civil war. There is Ugwu, the houseboy of a university lecturer; Olanna, the lecturer's partner; and Richard, an English journalist who lives with Olanna's twin sister. They are forced together and separated in unexpected ways throughout the war, each witnessing events that affect them deeply.

Interwoven in the main plot are other important themes, the necessity (for the innocent people displaced by war) and ineffectiveness (through corruption and misappropriation) of emergency relief aid; the use of child soldiers and horrors they are forced to endure; how the West perceives Africa (a good example being the situation when two American reporters are more interested in the death of one white journalist than one thousand local, black civilians); how religion, tribal loyalties and the political elite can tear a country apart; and how many of these factors can be traced back to the impact that colonialism had on the country. There are significant lessons that can be drawn from this novel, particularly with regards to how the world is dealing with the current crisis in Darfur, for example.

The structure of the novel worked well, creating intrigue and suspense throughout. It was gripping from start to finish but the tension that built in the final section meant it had to be read in one session - there was no way it could be put down.

It is one of those few books that leave you staring at the final page, not wanting to believe that it's all over. Needless to say, given the topic, it is quite a harrowing and distressing account of war. But the author's passion and dedication for her country (especially since she lost a number of her own relatives in the war) shows throughout the book. The way she describes its resilient people, traditional food (except for Harrison's rather amusing obsession with Western food), and local traditions leave you with a feeling that you have been to Nigeria yourself.

It will undoubtedly be a major contribution to African literature and is highly recommended.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 3, 2014 11:35 AM GMT


Restless
Restless
by William Boyd
Edition: Hardcover

24 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Couldn't put it down..., 14 Aug. 2006
This review is from: Restless (Hardcover)
Restless is quite different in style when compared to Boyd's other novels, being more like a John le Carre thriller, but it's gripping stuff.

Alternating between 1976 when Ruth, the daughter of an ex-British spy, is forced to come to terms with her mothers past, and a few decades earlier, when 'Eva' is recruited by the British following her brothers death and is sent on various missions, the novel develops into a highly complex story with a thrilling finale.

Highly recommended.


Q and A (filmed as Slumdog Millionaire)
Q and A (filmed as Slumdog Millionaire)
by Vikas Swarup
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £12.99

16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely stunning!, 16 May 2005
This book had me hooked within a couple of pages and I couldn't put it down until I reached the final page!
Swarup's perception of 'street-life' and the difficulties of surviving in urban India are fantastic, and his style of writing keeps you gripped the whole way through. While the account of Ram's life is tragic, powerful and often very moving, the end of each chapter has you laughing out loud as the wisdom he has gained enables him to answer the 12 questions correctly.
I doubt I will read a better book this year. I cannot recommend it enough!


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