Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 70% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now
Profile for Dr John the Day Tripper > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Dr John the Da...
Top Reviewer Ranking: 54,975
Helpful Votes: 536

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Dr John the Day Tripper "Dr John the Day Tripper" (Reading, Berks, United Kingdom)
(VINE VOICE)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6
pixel
20 Mini Magnets NEODYMIUM 3 x 6 mm (HxD) super strong N45 Brand: HAB & GUT , MC000
20 Mini Magnets NEODYMIUM 3 x 6 mm (HxD) super strong N45 Brand: HAB & GUT , MC000

4.0 out of 5 stars Strong but fiddly, 2 July 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Yes, very strong but also quite fiddly to remove from a surface they are stuck to. I left them in their cardboard packaging and cut it into pieces; this makes it easier to handle them but they're still strong enough to do a useful job.


JJC Automatic Open/Close Lens Cap for Pentax MX-1
JJC Automatic Open/Close Lens Cap for Pentax MX-1
Offered by PowerPlanet
Price: £10.99

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Neat, if a little plasticky for the price. ..., 29 Sept. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Neat, if a little plasticky for the price. However, be careful before buying if you bought the Hozer "Ever Ready" camera case for your MX-1, because this doesn't fit inside it.


Berlin Diary: The Journal of a Foreign Correspondent 1934-1941
Berlin Diary: The Journal of a Foreign Correspondent 1934-1941
Price: £6.79

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating insight, 15 Jan. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Shirer's diaries of his time as a foreign correspondent in Germany are a fascinating insight into not only the rise of the Nazis in Germany, and the early part of the Second World War, but also into the way that journalists work and governments manipulate the way that news is disseminated. Shirer's diaries show his perceptions of the Nazis as dissembling thugs and bullies, and how they manipulated the presentation of circumstances to support their occupations of the Sudetenland, Austria, and subsequently to justify the invasions of Poland, Belgium, the Netherlands and France (all presented by the German press, under Nazi control, as defensive actions, either to support ethnic German populations in those countries, or to prevent the dastardly forces of the Allies from launching counter-attacks against the Germans). However, it's also clear that the continuous flow of Nazi propaganda tended to colour the way he reported from Berlin (because his access to information was controlled by the German government and his reports were subject to censorship even before it was a military necessity) and it's interesting to read his perceptions of what is happening, given the information he has access to, and comparing it with the many other perspectives that are available in all the other histories of the period.

I'm really quite surprised that Shirer got out of Germany without coming to the tender attentions of the SS or the Gestapo, given the content of the diaries - he must either have kept them very well-concealed (and he admits at one point that his attempts to do so were pretty amateurish), or he must have written some of the more discursive reflections on the Nazi state (and the prevailing attitudes of the German in the street) after he left Germany in 1940/1. I am pretty sure that his descriptions of, for instance, the Nazi policy of killing the mentally disabled would have been enough for him to be despatched to a concentration camp, or just to have met with a nasty accident.

One of the things that come out of reading these diaries is how, in the end, the whole era of the Second World War was just part of a transitional period from the monarchic empires of the Victorian and Edwardian era through to the world as we know it today; the transition started with the clash between the totalitarian ideologies of Fascism and Communism, with the post-monarchic democratic states dithering in the middle and the United States standing in isolation on the sidelines. Policies like appeasement can be seen from the perspective of trying (unsuccessfully) to play the totalitarians off against each other, motivated by the desire never to get drawn into another pointless slaughter like the Great War. The great diplomatic manouevres like the anti-Comintern pact, the Nazi/Soviet non-aggression pact, and the subsequent slide into the Cold War, were reflected on an intra-national scale (Shirer has some interesting observations after the fall of France on how the French actually failed to resist the German advance, and attributes it to both Fascist sympathisers at the top of the French Army and Communist sympathisers at the bottom). The Second World War pretty much put paid to the Fascist ideology, the Cold War to Communism, but you can't help but feel that things are still in a state of flux.


Le Dīner De Cons [DVD] [1998]
Le Dīner De Cons [DVD] [1998]
Dvd ~ Jacques Villeret
Offered by Digizoneuk
Price: £19.47

4.0 out of 5 stars I laughed immoderately, 10 Dec. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I spent quite a long time snorting with laughter while watching this. M. Pignon is a great comic creation, although to be honest (as others have observed) he's the only really sympathetic character in the film; M. Brochant, who has invited Pignon as his candidate for the biggest idiot at le diner des cons, pretty much deserves everything he gets as a result of this. (I particularly like the scene where Pignon's colleague from the Ministry of Finance is asked to come over to reveal the location of the love nest where Brochant's wife has supposedly gone, resulting in Brochant having to hide all his art works and valuables to avoid being identified as the potential target of a tax audit... which, naturally, all goes wrong).

In the end, it's a good evening's entertainment; it probably doesn't bear frequent re-watching, but is worth having in reserve to pull out on a wet Sunday.


Amazon e-Reader USB Charger for Amazon eReaders, UK
Amazon e-Reader USB Charger for Amazon eReaders, UK

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Hellish expensive, 8 Dec. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
In common with a lot of other people, it seems to me that 17.99 is a helluva price for a plug. JUST. A. PLUG. Not even the cable to go with it. What the heck does it do? Deliver little gold-plated electrons or something? I cannot see how Amazon can justify this price, and also feel that there's a bit of a con trick going on when - if you order a Kindle - there is a message saying that the charger isn't included and offering you the option of adding this to the order.


Navigation...: A Newcomer's Guide
Navigation...: A Newcomer's Guide
by Sara Hopkinson
Edition: Paperback

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very good introduction, well laid out, 22 Nov. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is well written, nicely presented and has good, clear diagrams. The book is organised in a logical fashion and builds up on knowledge at each stage:

- it starts with how you identify or give a position using latitude and longitude or by range and bearing;
- then progresses to how you actually identify your position using GPS, by getting a fix using a chart and the bearings of external objects or by using dead reckoning and estimated positions taking tidal stream into account
- discusses tides, tidal heights and ranges, tide tables, tidal streams and the way in which chart information is presented relative to the state of the tide
- using all the information about identifying position and tides then moves onto how to plot and steer a course taking all of these factors into consideration
- explains the buoyage system and symbols on charts
- describes pilotage using this information
- passage planning
- finally discusses use of various electronic aids

This last (electronic aids) is potentially the downfall of these sorts of books, just because they evolve so fast nowadays - I bought a copy of the RYA: Navigation Handbook some years ago, which had quite a lot of space devoted to this and the devices described now look quite antiquated (no doubt there is now an updated edition, however). Hence I think that this book does the right thing, virtually relegating them to an appendix. In any case, it's important to be able to navigate without electronic aids, so the book does the right thing in leaving them largely till the end.


Dilbert 2.0: The Dot-Com Bubble, 1998 to 2000
Dilbert 2.0: The Dot-Com Bubble, 1998 to 2000
Price: £7.67

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A bit of a rip-off, 10 Nov. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I think when this was originally published in hardback as one volume, it was pretty expensive (about £50 - it seems too have come down to around £25 now). So splitting it into four Kindle volumes at £6.58 each probably sounds like a bargain. However, I felt pretty miffed when I discovered that the introduction by Scott Adams is exactly the same in both volumes of this I purchased for Kindle (Dilbert 2.0: The Dot-Com Bubble, 1998 to 2000 and Dilbert 2.0: The Modern Era, 2001 to 2008: 20 Years of Dilbert). What's more, in the "Dot-Com" volume, it constitutes about a third of the actual volume; at least in the "Modern Era" there's a much larger cartoon:introduction ratio. Surely it wouldn't have been too much to ask of the publishers to ask for some volume-specific introduction, rather than just lazily cutting and pasting the same content into each volume?

e-publishing is all very well, but it seems that it's often an excuse for publishers to do as little as possible to try and wring a bit more profit out of something that they already have in their catalogue. More effort please.

By the way, do check that this can be delivered to your device - only Android,Kindle Fire and iPad. Not for standard Kindles or Kindle readers on PCs.


Berkeley Breathed's Outland: The Complete Collection
Berkeley Breathed's Outland: The Complete Collection
by Berkeley Breathed
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £29.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Oh dear. This could get expensive, 19 Oct. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
When travelling to the USA on a regular basis in the 1980s and early 1990s, I got hooked on a number of comic strips that appeared in US newspapers, one of which was "Bloom County". The author, Berkeley Breathed, stopped producing Bloom County in 1989 (there's an explanation in the preface to this book, involving the stress of producing a daily strip to deadline, a risky drive back from the airport where he'd rushed to deliver a strip for despatch to his syndicate, and him finishing up facing the wrong way on a highway with trucks bearing down on him - consequently he decided that it was time to retire the strip).

"Outland" was the successor strip to Bloom County, and presumably as a Sunday-only strip it reduced the stress levels (though footnotes in here indicate that he still had problems meeting deadlines). It started off as a rather different beast to Bloom County, with only the character of Opus the penguin and Ronald-Ann, the ghetto child, making the transition. Outland was where Ronald-Ann went to escape from the realities of ghetto life, and was a very different proposition to the moderately recognisable world of Bloom County (OK, yes, so there were loads of anthropomorphised animals with distinctly odd characteristics). Outland, on the other hand, was a very surrealistic landscape, resembling a cross between George Herriman's backgrounds for the Krazy Kat comics, a Dali landscape, and a Roger Dean album cover for Yes. The new characters were also rather more bizarre, and allowed Breathed to take a poke at a number of targets (for some reason, he seemed to have a grudge against the Disney Corporation and his footnotes in this collection indicate that he was almost inviting them to sue him, not only for creating the character of Mortimer Mouse (Mickey's unlucky brother) but at times including Mickey Mouse and Michael Eisner in the strip). Eventually, however, over the course of the strip's life until 1995, more of the old Bloom County characters crept back in and the surreal elements faded away - maybe it was difficult to keep up that level of invention, or maybe it was just easier to make jokes in the earlier medium. Whatever the reason, by the time that Outland was retired, it was very similar to the old Bloom County strips. Not that that was a bad thing.

The title of this review alludes to the packaging of this particular collection. This is a lovely product; good quality heavy gauge paper and colour reproduction of the strips, excellent hardback binding, comprehensive coverage, and a foreword and footnotes by Breathed. It's just nice to have, even if you're not a particular fan of the strip, though you probably wouldn't pay for it on that basis. But I see that the longer run of Bloom County, from the same publisher, is spread over 5 volumes. I think I'd have to get a mortgage to pay for the whole lot....


BlackBerry BAT-17720-002 D-x1 Battery
BlackBerry BAT-17720-002 D-x1 Battery
Offered by Invero
Price: £6.25

1.0 out of 5 stars Potentially dangerous - beware., 18 Sept. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I bought this as a replacement for the battery that came with my Blackberry Storm 2, which seemed to be getting a bit knackered. I subsequently replaced the Storm 2 with another phone, and it sat in the drawer for a while, with this replacement battery inside, until I needed to get some information off the old Blackberry.

As the battery was by now flat, I plugged in the charger. After a short while, I noticed that the back of the phone had come off; so I tried to click it back on, thinking I must have disturbed it when getting it out of the drawer. It turned out that the battery was actually *swelling* and that was what had forced the back off the phone. I very rapidly took phone and battery outside, removed the battery from the phone and put it on a wall where it couldn't do any damage should it catch fire or explode.

I don't know what might have happened had I left this battery charging unattended - perhaps nothing, but, I would be very circumspect before chancing it. The old battery was perfectly fine, despite not having been charged up for even longer.


Dodger
Dodger
by Terry Pratchett
Edition: Hardcover

6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Back on an upward slope, 17 Sept. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Dodger (Hardcover)
I have to say,I was pretty disappointed with The Long Earth, which took an inordinate number of pages doing fairly repetitive and predictable things, before coming to what seemed a rather rushed conclusion. So "Dodger" is a bit of a (but not a total) return to form. It's always been obvious that Ankh Morpork is an amalgam of many cities over many time periods, but that there's a large element of Dickensian London in there. Dodger-like characters have always been part of the mix as well - Nobby Nobbs, for example, although he lacks quite a lot of the moral characteristics shown by this Dodger. (There's even an Artful Nudger who makes a cameo appearance in "Jingo", I believe). So it's perhaps not surprising that Terry Pratchett should actually set a story in the milieu of mid-19th century London (with a number of anachronisms which he admits - come on, people, it's a historical *fantasy*, it's not supposed to be accurate), allowing him to explore a number of his favourite themes in a bit more detail. (Toshing, for example, and searching for a fabled tosheroon, are topics that crop up whenever Harry, King of the Golden River, appears in one of the Discworld books - as is the comparison between toshing and journalism as muckraking, which appears both in "The Truth" and here. Very convenient that Charles Dickens was a journalist).

So is this a book up there with his best output? The story rattles along, lots of actual Victorians (including Victoria herself) make appearances and help to move the plot along (or sometimes to allow Terry a diversion into some social commentary), and there is a lot of entertaining dialogue between the characters. BECAUSE it takes place in a place and time which actually existed, it requires a rather greater suspension of disbelief than would a story set on the Discworld - you do have to stop saying to yourself "that couldn't have happened then", or "I'm sure the real Victorians wouldn't have done that", whereas you just ignore the anomalies in a Discworld story. And, given that the target audience of the novel is young adults, I think it's an admirable platform to interest people in some of the source material which obviously adorns Terry's library, such as Mayhew's studies of the London poor, or Dickens' campaigning journalism.

Having said all that, this is the first book of Terry's for a long time which I haven't just read cover to cover without any real pause, and I didn't really find myself snorting with laughter as I do with novels from the Discworld series. On the other hand, I will probably pick it up and re-read it sometime in the near future, which I do with pretty much all of the Discworld books (and unlike "The Long Earth", which has remained on the bookshelf since I finished it). So not a complete return to form, but good nonetheless.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6