Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 50% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn more Shop now Shop now
Profile for Dr John the Day Tripper > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Dr John the Da...
Top Reviewer Ranking: 78,964
Helpful Votes: 534

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Dr John the Day Tripper "Dr John the Day Tripper" (Reading, Berks, United Kingdom)
(VINE VOICE)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6
pixel
More Than Somewhat
More Than Somewhat
Price: £3.99

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars At last - Runyon in Kindle format, 8 Jan. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I have some old paperback collections of Runyon's short stories, which are falling to bits owing to the shortcomings of 1970s/80s paperback bindings and excessive re-reading, because I absolutely love these stories. So I've been searching in vain for some time to find an e-book edition (it seems to be difficult to find comprehensive paper versions nowadays as well) and was mightily pleased to discover this one. Unlike most e-books, which seem to have been generated using rather poor OCR systems, this one is well formatted with relatively few typos, and just about justifies what is a relatively high price; and if people paying this price encourages the publishers to get their act together and publish the rest of of the short stories soon, I'll be waiting impatiently to get the next collection.

Runyon's Broadway is one of those timeless fantasy worlds, like Blandings Castle or Ankh-Morpork, that I love to revisit as often as I can. Unlike Blandings, but rather like Ankh-Morpork, Broadway is populated with quite a few characters that you'd rather not meet in reality, like Harry the Horse, or Little Isadore, but are overjoyed to hear their activities recounted as seen through the eyes of Runyon's narrator. The tales are also surprisingly moral; while most of the these people wouldn't know the law if they tripped over it, it's salutary to see how often people who do things which are pretty repugnant get their come-uppance (often in quite messy and unpleasant ways).
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 12, 2013 5:21 PM GMT


Wars of Empire in Cartoons
Wars of Empire in Cartoons
by Mark Bryant
Edition: Hardcover

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Less interesting than others in this series, 21 Dec. 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I have purchased quite a few of the books Mark Bryant has assembled, charting the history of various wars through the cartoons published at the time. I've been through World Wars I and II, and the Napoleonic wars, and found all of the books entertaining and informative, especially for someone like me who dropped history at school in favour of doing sciences (badly). However, this book didn't live up to my expectations - no fault of Mark Bryant's, I hasten to say, much more to do with the jingoistic and, sorry to say, largely humourless attitude of the Victorian and Edwardian cartoonists. Again, that's not to say that they weren't brilliant artists (just look at the craftsmanship of Tenniel, for example) but the ideas for their cartoons seemed to have come directly from whatever the Victorian equivalent of the Central Office of Information was. If you compare this with, say, the vitriol in many of the cartoons from the Georgian era, seen in the equivalent volume on the Napoleonic Wars, or the humorous social commentary in the cartoons from the World Wars, then the Victorian and Edwardian cartoons get mighty wearisome after a while.

Having said all that, I guess that is perhaps just a reflection of the social attitudes of the times, and from a historical point of view, it is probably a very fair representation of prevailing attitudes. However, I always hope when seeing cartoons, to see the anti-establishment as well as the establishment view of the world.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 29, 2015 2:09 PM BST


Tales of Monkey Island - Collector's Edition (PC DVD)
Tales of Monkey Island - Collector's Edition (PC DVD)

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Is it really nearly 20 years?, 21 Dec. 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I worked out that it must be the best part of 20 years since the first part of the Monkey Island games came out, because I can remember where I was working when I wasted more of my employer's time than I should have done working my way through the game and being entertained by the sly humour. I bought all the subsequent games, though I have to admit that I gave up rather on the fourth one (I can't remember the particular variation on the theme of the name now) - mostly because they had gone to a game engine that allowed the characters to be moved in sort-of-three-dimensions but which was really rather tedious to use.

However, I'm glad to report that this game doesn't suffer from those problems. It maintains the humour, and - amazingly - the voice artists are, by and large, the same as they were in earlier games. Even Murray, the evil talking skull, makes an appearance in one of the chapters of the game. Controlling the motion of the characters is a bit tricky to start off with (the ship on which they are is pitching and rolling) but getting past that introductory section is relatively easy (as long as you remember from previous games what you need to dispose of the ghost pirate, leChuck).

If you enjoyed the previous versions of Monkey Island, you will almost certainly enjoy this game as well. I suspect that you need a reasonably high-powered machine to get decent smooth action and response times, though - I certainly noticed a difference when I used the high-performance graphic processor compared to using the standard processor (an option that can be chosen from the right-click menu when launching the game).

The "deluxe" version of this comes in a nice package filled with useless tat, but I'm not sure if you can buy a plain vanilla, no-frills version - might be worth having a look around (unless you're an aficionado of tat, of course).


The Accidental Assassin: An Island, A Poodle, A Body ...
The Accidental Assassin: An Island, A Poodle, A Body ...
by Jan Toms
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Promising idea, not great execution, 23 Sept. 2011
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I tried to like this book, I really did. The idea is promising, though the premise (mild-mannered civil servant accidentally bumps off a lot of nasty people and is mistaken for a hit-man) is sufficiently far-fetched that it needs to be written all-out for humou; you aren't going to suspend disbelief to that extent, so it had better be entertaining. Unfortunately, I found the characters stereotyped and unidimensional, and while there were odd flashes of humour, not really enough to carry me along.

It might just be me though; I see others have read and enjoyed this, but I really did find it a struggle at times to pick it up and carry on. It's sat on my bedside table for quite a while now along with a number of other books, and I usually pick up one of the others when I want to read for a while. I just didn't get enough out of it, or care about any of the characters to the extent that I wanted to know what heppened next.


Napoleonic Wars in Cartoons
Napoleonic Wars in Cartoons
by Mark Bryant
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent capsule history of the Napoleonic Wars, 23 Aug. 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I bought this because of a general interest I have in cartoons and caricatures, and I have previously purchased Mark Bryant's excellent cartoon histories of World Wars 1 and 2. However, this one also holds a special interest for me because the Napoleonic Wars coincides with the golden age of Gillray and Cruikshank, and Gillray is - in my view - probably one of the finest caricaturists there has ever been. This collection shows just how prolific he was,for how long, and the quality of his drawings, and the biting level of the satire is second to none. (Which is not to say that there aren't many other fine cartoons and caricatures in this collection, although many look very crude by comparison).

In addition to this, however, this is also a very fine capsule history of the Napoleonic Wars, and the ebbs and flows of fortune over an extended period. I think this is the first time I've ever really got an overview of what happened, and why, during this era, and I'd heartily recommend it as a source of information as well as a fine collection of social and satirical comment.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 28, 2012 4:43 PM GMT


All The Devils Are Here: Unmasking the Men Who Bankrupted the World
All The Devils Are Here: Unmasking the Men Who Bankrupted the World
by Bethany McLean
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Devil's game of pass the parcel, 27 July 2011
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
How interested are you in how the financial system came crashing round everybody's ears? How high is your tolerance for three letter acronyms? If your answer to both is "quite high", this is an excellent book that gives a pretty readable account of what happened in the Noughties that left the world financial system in its current fragile state. (If you're not particularly interested, or if TLAs make your head spin, this may not be the book for you).

This is a very US-centric account of the financial crisis - other financial centres outside the US get barely a mention, but there is no doubt that the same thing was going on all over the world. Governmental policies to increase the level of home ownership, deregulation allowing a broader range of lenders to get into the mortgage market, aggressive lending policies, financial engineering that involved parcelling up potentially risky loans into securitised bundles that theoretically spread the risk, and lax due diligence on the part of ratings agencies resulted in what can be described as perhaps the biggest Ponzi scheme ever, or certainly as a Devil's game of pass the parcel. Potentially lousy loans to homeowners were hidden away in bonds that were then sold on to investors. Bonds were bundled into more bonds and sold to yet more investors. Eventually , investors were buying "synthetic CDOs" that didn't even contain ANY bonds, mortgages, or other collateral, but merely referenced other bonds. At one end of the scale, investors were putting money into bonds where they had NO idea about the riskiness of the underlying collateral - at the other end, mortgages were being provided (usually to people refinancing their houses to release capital, so not even meeting the supposed objective of increasing the level of home ownership) based on either inadequate information (no requirement to disclose income) or fraudulent applications, often perpetrated by the loan agents. And on top of all this, the ratings agencies were assuring everybody that the bonds were triple-A rated so that everybody felt secure. And eventually - as we all know to our cost - the whole house of cards came crashing round everybody's ears.

Given the complexity of the material being discussed, this is a very well written book. You need to be fairly motivated to keep on ploughing through (especially as it's not exactly a cliff-hanger, we know how it turned out) but there's enough additional colour about the key players, their backgrounds and the way they oeprated, to keep you engaged with reading on. (Surprising how many of the key players had a background as a football or hockey (American style) players at college or afterwards, or military backgrounds. Says a lot about the people who get into financial services perhaps).

So, recommended if you want to know about this stuff, but be prepared for it to get a bit turgid in places. (There IS a good glossary, which helps!)


Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog) (Carefully formatted by Timeless Classic Books)
Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog) (Carefully formatted by Timeless Classic Books)

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Carefully formatted? don't you believe it, 4 July 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
You don't have to be Lynne Truss to get annoyed by the use of double quotes instead of apostrophes, words that run together, etc. For something that claims to be carefully formatted, they didn't spend much time proof-reading this is all I can say. (The mis-formatting shows up on both the Kindle and on the Windows Kindle reader, so it's not just a device-specific problem).

Find a freebie version if you can.

[UPDATE: It gets worse. I just found a whole chapter repeated, line breaks in the wrong place - rating down from 2 stars to one now as a consequence]


Belkin F8N051 Messenger Bag for Laptops, Macbooks and Chromebooks up to 17 inch - Black/Red
Belkin F8N051 Messenger Bag for Laptops, Macbooks and Chromebooks up to 17 inch - Black/Red
Price: £19.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Difficult to fault it really, 13 Jun. 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
...so I won't. This is a great bag for the price; it's a little snug squeezing my laptop in (Samsung RF711 17.3-inch notebook PC (Intel Core i5-2410M 2.3 Ghz, 6GB RAM, 1TB HDD, WLAN, Webcam, Win 7 Home Premium)) but it fits. Just. The bag to hold the power adapter and cable is a really useful addition. And I can fit that, plus a Logitech cordless mouse into the front zipped pocket.

I haven't tried carrying the laptop in the bag, so I can't really comment on how good it is as an actual travel case, but then I bought the laptop as a desktop replacement machine, with no real intent of lugging it hither and thither. As a storage case it's great, and at this price you can't really go wrong.

Oh, and it looks quite smart.


Logitech M505 Wireless Mouse - Black
Logitech M505 Wireless Mouse - Black

5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant mouse, 3 Jun. 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I bought one of these to replace a Bluetooth mouse that was getting temperamental and which then finally stopped working. This is a really good little device - nice fit to the hand, genuinely plug-and-go, battery life is claimed to be 15 months and so far have no reason to doubt that it will be. In fact, I liked it so much I actually went out and bought another to use on my work laptop.


Samsung RF711 17.3-inch Laptop PC (Intel Core i5-2410M 2.3 Ghz, 6GB RAM,  1TB HDD, WLAN, Webcam, Win 7 Home Premium)
Samsung RF711 17.3-inch Laptop PC (Intel Core i5-2410M 2.3 Ghz, 6GB RAM, 1TB HDD, WLAN, Webcam, Win 7 Home Premium)

10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nice machine but could do with Windows 7 Professional rather than Home Premium, 23 May 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Having ordered an Acer Aspire from another vendor who then diddled around for several weeks before finally announcing it was out of stock, I then came to Amazon and ordered this machine instead (and it turned up two days later). It's very good hardware, brilliant screen but - as with all of these machines - there is quite a bit of bloatware on it. I have one real gripe though; this comes with Windows 7 Home Premium. I use my laptop in conjunction with a home network which has a Ubuntu server. There seems to be some bug in Windows 7 to do with DHCP Broadcast flags which stop DHCP connections over a wireless network (works fine on a wired Ethernet connection, or with a static IP address on the wireless connection). In order to solve this, I have googled various suggestions which indicate that you need to change a setting in the policy editor...but this is not supported in Home Premium. So if I want to change it, I'm going to have to start messing with regedit, which I would really rather not do. In any case, it would seem reasonable to me that a machine with this spec really deserves Professional rather than Home Premium - the latter seems like a bit of a shabby compromise to me.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 17, 2011 2:21 PM BST


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6