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Mr. Brian R. Dougal (Cheadle Hulme, Cheshire, United Kingdom)
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Wansview wireless pan/tilt ip camera, day and night vision/ internet surveillance home security camera, 2 way andio, support phone remote monitoring
Wansview wireless pan/tilt ip camera, day and night vision/ internet surveillance home security camera, 2 way andio, support phone remote monitoring

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wansview appears to be the Best of these cameras, 26 Mar. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This basic camera design can be had from numerous companies (= manufacturers).
They vary conciderably in price.
Note for anyone contemplating using multiple cameras - their firmware is NOT compatible, which means the multi-cam views they all offer ONLY work if all the cameras are from the same manufacturer.

I have 4 of these Wansview models, all working very well. The bandwidth required must be quite modest, as I can check all simultaneously on a 3G phone connection very readilly (even when only a 2G service is available all images at full res come in in 1 - 2 mins).
Setting up the cams themselves is very easy, and again the Wansview documentation is way above some others I've seen. Setting up for remote monitoring could be tricky IF you have no understanding of IP issues, port forwarding etc and something doesn't work as expected. The instructions show what to do but clearly can't describe the specific router settings for every router. So having the router manual available is required...

(I have read critisisms of various security & home automation products, given 1* ratings because the purchaser expected "plug-and-play" type simplicity. Sorry that might arrive one day but it is NOT here yet !!!).


COOLEAD L610WS P2P  Wireless IP camera webcam /Tilt 2-ways Audio Mobile Viewing WEP/WPA/WAP2 wireless Wi-Fi Pan/Tilt internet IP camera day and night vision CCTV security monitor With  IR-Cut
COOLEAD L610WS P2P Wireless IP camera webcam /Tilt 2-ways Audio Mobile Viewing WEP/WPA/WAP2 wireless Wi-Fi Pan/Tilt internet IP camera day and night vision CCTV security monitor With IR-Cut
Offered by COOLEAD
Price: £30.99

3.0 out of 5 stars An ordering lottery, 13 Feb. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Only order this "item" if you like surprises. Note the manufacturer and model are given as "generic".
There is a user photo showing the Wansview camera. That's what I wanted. What arrived were TCL Tenvis JPT3815 units. I've sent them back.
Update - all compliments to Amazon,s return process,v easy & free.
Now received the replacement Wansview units I wanted. 5* review will be written for them !


James Brindley: The First Canal Builder
James Brindley: The First Canal Builder
by Nick Corble
Edition: Paperback
Price: £17.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Comparison - Richardson & Corble biographies, 13 Feb. 2013
This is a joint review of the books:
James Brindley: Canal Pioneer by Christine Richardson
James Brindley: The First Canal Builder by Nick Corble

If you are only going to buy one of these books, for most people Christine Richardson's would be much the better.
It gives good information about Brindley himself, but is outstanding in its coverage of WHY he built his canals WHERE he did. It is full of maps showing the relevant features as existing before and after his works.

However it is primarily a biography of Brindley as a Canal Builder. He only really got started on this when he was 40.

Nick Corble's book is strictly a biography, covering his work only as it impacted him as a person. It takes a more traditional "one chapter per decade" approach, so is very much more detailed on this family history, starting from his grandparents' generation. It is also more thorough in its treatment of his time working as a millwright. His time on the Bridgewater Canal is treated in great depth (perhaps even over-emphasising the importance of "the Duke's cut"). However his involvement with the Trent & Mersey Canal is definitely very much under-valued. A reader new to all this would completely fail to realise the T&M was hugely more significant to the development of the country than the Bridgewater ever was. Also missing is the key geographical importance of the watershed at Harecastle (north of which water flows up to the Mersey, south of it the river Trent flows round the bottom of the Pennines then up to the Humber). Canals were not new, but before Brindley, they had all (Bridgewater included) basically followed river valleys. Barton Aqueduct was important in persuading money-men to invest in Canals. But engineering wise it was little more than a big bridge, and nothing compared with the big tunnel through Harecastle hill.

I find Christine Richardson's book excellent in so many ways. Importantly it is objective, this is not a hero-worship of Brindley or any of the characters. It builds a good picture of the background happening in England at the time. Where the narrowboat gauge came from is covered. The relative importance of Josiah Wedgwood vs Duke of Bridgwater in both Brindley's life and to canal development appears to me more balanced and accurate than Nick Corble's.
This is an example to all of how to write a biography of someone who is famous for scientific/engineering reasons.
However it does devote just 2 chapters to his millwrighting days, then 10 to the rest of his life. So if it could be improved at all, it would be to have 1 extra chapter added to describe more fully his family history & very early years.

What comes out of both is why a millwright would be the person to develop canals. The dominant power source in England in 1750 was water. Millwrights had been building artificial streams, dams and water courses for many years to get good flow over water wheels. This is pre- steam engines, and as we are currently re-learning, windmills are very unreliable and produce little power ! So the same only bigger, and he had immense natural talent at it.


James Brindley: Canal Pioneer
James Brindley: Canal Pioneer
by Christine Richardson
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Comparison - Richardson & Corble biographies, 13 Feb. 2013
This is a joint review of the books:
James Brindley: Canal Pioneer by Christine Richardson
James Brindley: The First Canal Builder by Nick Corble

If you are only going to buy one of these books, for most people Christine Richardson's would be much the better.
It gives good information about Brindley himself, but is outstanding in its coverage of WHY he built his canals WHERE he did. It is full of maps showing the relevant features as existing before and after his works.

However it is primarily a biography of Brindley as a Canal Builder. He only really got started on this when he was 40.

Nick Corble's book is strictly a biography, covering his work only as it impacted him as a person. It takes a more traditional "one chapter per decade" approach, so is very much more detailed on this family history, starting from his grandparents' generation. It is also more thorough in its treatment of his time working as a millwright. His time on the Bridgewater Canal is treated in great depth (perhaps even over-emphasising the importance of "the Duke's cut"). However his involvement with the Trent & Mersey Canal is definitely very much under-valued. A reader new to all this would completely fail to realise the T&M was hugely more significant to the development of the country than the Bridgewater ever was. Also missing is the key geographical importance of the watershed at Harecastle (north of which water flows up to the Mersey, south of it the river Trent flows round the bottom of the Pennines then up to the Humber). Canals were not new, but before Brindley, they had all (Bridgewater included) basically followed river valleys. Barton Aqueduct was important in persuading money-men to invest in Canals. But engineering wise it was little more than a big bridge, and nothing compared with the big tunnel through Harecastle hill.

I find Christine Richardson's book excellent in so many ways. Importantly it is objective, this is not a hero-worship of Brindley or any of the characters. It builds a good picture of the background happening in England at the time. Where the narrowboat gauge came from is covered. The relative importance of Josiah Wedgwood vs Duke of Bridgwater in both Brindley's life and to canal development appears to me more balanced and accurate than Nick Corble's.
This is an example to all of how to write a biography of someone who is famous for scientific/engineering reasons.
However it does devote just 2 chapters to his millwrighting days, then 10 to the rest of his life. So if it could be improved at all, it would be to have 1 extra chapter added to describe more fully his family history & very early years.

What comes out of both is why a millwright would be the person to develop canals. The dominant power source in England in 1750 was water. Millwrights had been building artificial streams, dams and water courses for many years to get good flow over water wheels. This is pre- steam engines, and as we are currently re-learning, windmills are very unreliable and produce little power ! So the same only bigger, and he had immense natural talent at it.


How Steam Locomotives Really Work (Popular Science)
How Steam Locomotives Really Work (Popular Science)
by P. W. B. Semmens
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.52

5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book - describes the whole locomotive, not just the steam-engine bits, 12 Feb. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
No wonder steam locomotive drivers & firemen were held in such high esteem ! Having read this book, and realised just how much they had to think about and do every single journey, I am in awe.
This excellent book describes the whole locomotive, as a towing vehicle, not just the steam-engine (boiler, pistons etc).

It claims to be, and is, a description of loco technology in the final days of steam traction. Unfortunately all the interveening advances between Trevithick and then are not covered. This is a pity - perhaps the authors would like to write such a history. Based on this book I would certainly buy it !


Kenwood FP731 Multi Pro Food Processor
Kenwood FP731 Multi Pro Food Processor

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent value, masses of accessories provided, 19 Dec. 2012
As a fan of well engineered (= over engineered ???) products I was somewhat afraid that this, as it is a lot of kit for the money, would turn out to be skimped and flimsy. Fortunately NOT so. Whilst clearly not professional "use 8 hours a day every day" type build quality, it seems a sensible quality overall.

The extras are numerous. Far more useful than we expected is the extra small bowl & blade which fits inside the main one. Vari-speed is useful.

Only downsides are 1) a lot of kit = a lot of space needed to store it all !
2) I would have to concur with others, it is a nuisance the centre drive spindle keeps falling off. However it is probably an inevitable part of a design which includes both a food processor and a liquidiser on the same motor base.


MaxiMag antenna for Huawei E160 E176 E182 E182e + 9dbi
MaxiMag antenna for Huawei E160 E176 E182 E182e + 9dbi
Offered by sotel-electronics
Price: £9.99

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent product - multi-frequency, 7 Nov. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Got this to use on my narrow boat.
For use with Huawei dongle (& SIM chip from my Vodafone BlackBerry) in laptop PC.
Significantly better reception compared with taking the laptop out of the boat.
Obviously massive improvement cf without it inside the steel (= near Faraday cage) boat !

Note it is 40cm tall. It is designed to work with ALL the common mobile frequencies.


Two-Stroke Engine Repair and Maintenance
Two-Stroke Engine Repair and Maintenance
by Paul K. Dempsey
Edition: Paperback
Price: £18.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Useful little book with all too few competitors, 29 Aug. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Small 2-stroke garden tools fall into the category of being relatively inexpensive to buy but are nevertheless complicated to maintain oneself & prohibitively / uneconomically expensive to have repaired professionally.
Therefore a book like this is very useful.
The best aspects for me are that it is very general, it explains HOW the parts work, so one is prepared for whatever actual item needs repair. To try to offer a specific-to-model "Haynes" style book would be a lost cause for small cheap 2-strokes. There are hundreds of model types on the market. Even a specific item eg Manufacturer ABC chainsaw model XY123 will be found with various carbs, ignition components etc.

Other good points are the excellent writing style and a sensible & appropriate level of detail.
However it is clear that the American author never expected the book to be read outside the USA, but this matters little.


USB to RS232 - USB Converter Cable
USB to RS232 - USB Converter Cable
Offered by bomien
Price: £1.49

5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect with XP SP3, 17 April 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Plug and go.
Plug the USB end into the computer. Use the supplied mini-CD when Windows asks for it. Everything fine.

Used with a Garmin GPS. Garmin software instantly "found" the device, no need for any messing with settings etc.


ARCTIC F12 PRO TC - 120mm Low Noise Temperature Controlled Case Fan with Unique Anti-Vibration System
ARCTIC F12 PRO TC - 120mm Low Noise Temperature Controlled Case Fan with Unique Anti-Vibration System
Price: £4.99

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb design, extremely quiet, 17 April 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Bought 2 of these fans. Excellent value. Excellent design.
They are extremely quiet, inaudible in low RPM base mode, and still very quiet at high RPM. Even low speed shifts considerable amounts of air, and high RPM shifts huge amounts, reducing time required in this mode.
Much of this extra quieting comes from the mechanical isolation of the suspension rubber mountings.
(Note that the design only allows one-sided mounting, so if mounted for example in a case will only work as an EXTRACTION fan).


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