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G. Gilmour (Belfast N.Ireland)
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Design Patterns in Ruby (Addison-Wesley Professional Ruby)
Design Patterns in Ruby (Addison-Wesley Professional Ruby)
by Russ Olsen
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 28.79

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing Depth and Clarity, 15 July 2008
This book has three goals. To introduce Design Patterns, introduce Ruby and explain how the latter simplifies the former. That it manages to do so in 330 pages, without over-simplifying or stresing one goal at the expense of another, is an amazing achievement. Highly recommended to anyone interested in Design Patterns, regardless of their current language.


Agile Java: Crafting Code with Test-Driven Development (Robert C. Martin)
Agile Java: Crafting Code with Test-Driven Development (Robert C. Martin)
by Jeff Langr
Edition: Paperback
Price: 31.19

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best Introduction to Java Available, 12 July 2008
This book is a superb introduction to Java and TDD. The author takes the courageous approach of introducing objects and unit tests right from the start, rather than the traditional approach of covering 'procedural Java' first. The clarity and organization of the material is first rate, as is the gradual inclusion of real world issues. My only criticisms are firstly that it should be updated to use JUnit 4 and secondly that the setup appendix should cover Eclipse and/or NetBeans as well as IDEA.


xUnit Test Patterns: Refactoring Test Code (Addison Wesley Signature)
xUnit Test Patterns: Refactoring Test Code (Addison Wesley Signature)
by Gerard Meszaros
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 31.39

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Valuable but Flabby and Vague, 11 July 2008
The central problem of this book is that in order to justify the 'Patterns' part of the title the author has to abstract the material almost beyond the point of usefulness. Unless you have already discovered most of the techniques the author describes you will be hard pressed to understand his description of them, which does take away the point of buying the book. There is a lot of valuable material hiding in this book, in particular the taxonomy of Mocks / Test Doubles, but you have to work to find it. At over 800 pages the very size of the book is intimidating. Its hard not to contrast this book unfavorably with Next Generation Java Testing: TestNG and Advanced Concepts which explores the same material in a much more practical, focused and helpful manner.


SOA Using Java Web Services
SOA Using Java Web Services
by Mark D. Hansen
Edition: Paperback
Price: 38.99

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Strong Medicine For Experienced Developers, 11 July 2008
This is not a book for junior or intermediate Java developers looking to write their first web service. Nor is it a gradual introducion to the Web Services technology stack. Instead the book is aimed squarely at experienced developers who already know HTTP, SOAP, XML Schema, WSDL etc... and are still scratching their heads trying to make Web Services work in Java. The density of the material here is scary but the quality is superb. I've bought lots of Web Service books and this is the only one that was of practical use to me. Strongly recommended for those who seriously need to make SOA work.


Write Great Code, Volume 2: Thinking Low-Level, Writing High-Level: Thinking Low-level, Writing High-level v. 2
Write Great Code, Volume 2: Thinking Low-Level, Writing High-Level: Thinking Low-level, Writing High-level v. 2
by Randall Hyde
Edition: Paperback
Price: 26.74

7 of 20 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Very informative but over a decade too late, 10 Aug 2006
This book provides comprehensive, in-depth information about how the compiler for a 'C' like language generates assembly code and organizes the runtime structure of an executable. For a reader seeking this information I would recommend the text unreservedly.

However the book ignores the needs of contemporary software developers by continuously referencing C, C++, Pascal and Delphi as if they were still the dominant programming languages used in industry.

Java is dismissed out of hand as inefficient and there is no mention whatsoever of C# or VB .NET, desipte the fact that these are the languages being used by the overwhelming majority of developers today.

The author provides no coverage of over a decade of research into virtual machine design, dynamic compilation and runtime optimisation. This would be fine if the book was being marketed at a specialist audience but this is not the case.

As a course text on a college computer science course this book would be excellent. But an application developer using J2EE or .NET will not become a better programmer by learning how to reverse engineer 80x86 assembly.


The C++ Standard: Incorporating Technical Corrigendum No. 1 (Computer Science)
The C++ Standard: Incorporating Technical Corrigendum No. 1 (Computer Science)
by Bjarne Stroustrup
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 30.98

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Recommended for serious C++ developers, 27 April 2004
I bought this as a reference of last resort but was plesantly surprised bythe clear organisation and presentation of the material and how accessiblethe writing is. The hardback binding is useful as it tolerates a lot ofabuse while you flick back and forth. An excellent resource for anyone whoneeds in depth coverage of C++.


Effective XML: 50 Specific Ways to Improve Your XML (Effective Software Development)
Effective XML: 50 Specific Ways to Improve Your XML (Effective Software Development)
by Elliotte Rusty Harold
Edition: Paperback
Price: 26.34

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great compendium of XML best practises, 28 Feb 2004
As with 'Effective C++' and 'Effective Java' this is a 'so you know how to use it - this is how you use it right' book.
The book does a great job of organising the presenting the 'folk wisdom' that most developers accumulate when they spend an extended period of time playing with XML/XSLT/DOM etc... I found it a very enjoyable read and wish I had it available when I started using XML in my projects.
Although definitely recommended to XML beginners and intermediates there isnt a lot here for experienced XML developers. There were several points where I felt there wasnt the level of detail I expected (for example XML + CSS), hence four stars rather than five.


XQuery from the Experts: A Guide to the W3C XML Query Language
XQuery from the Experts: A Guide to the W3C XML Query Language
by Howard Katz
Edition: Paperback
Price: 31.48

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Does exactly what it says on the tin, 28 Feb 2004
I have quite a bit of XSLT experience and was looking for something that would enable me to learn XQuery, understand why it was required and gain some insight into the underlying implementations. In all three areas this book succeeded magnificently. The first and third chapters alone made the purchase worthwhile.
For anyone with previous XML experience this is the XQuery book to buy.


J2EE Applications and BEA WebLogic Server
J2EE Applications and BEA WebLogic Server
by Michael Girdley
Edition: Paperback

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not what I expected, 29 Oct 2001
As a comprehensive introduction to J2EE this book is fine, especially as the coverage is up to date.
However given the title, introduction and authors I was expecting clear and concise instructions on how to create and administer components and services in WebLogic. In this respect the book is sadly lacking.


Java.Rmi: The Remote Method Invocation Guide
Java.Rmi: The Remote Method Invocation Guide
by Esmond Pitt
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well worth the money, 9 Oct 2001
Most people learn RMI the hard way, via the JDK documentation and FAQ's. This book is an excellent guide to the subject and a worthwhile purchase for anyone involved in RMI or EJB development.
Huge effort has obviously been spent on making the text as clear and readible as possible. My only criticism is that I would have liked more in-depth discussion of how implementations actually work.


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