Profile for Lord Shipley > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Lord Shipley
Top Reviewer Ranking: 682,136
Helpful Votes: 45

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Lord Shipley (Bradford, UK)

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Silver Age
Silver Age
Price: £13.71

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I love Bob!, 2 Aug. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Silver Age (Audio CD)
Just the greatest man in music. Ever. This is an astonishing record, every bit as good as Copper Blue and certainly better than either Candy Apple Grey or Warehouse. How he keeps cranking out such consisisent quality is anyone's guess, but it it doesn't matter just as long as he does. I saw him live in Leeds a couple of months back and it was storming; first 5 tracks played were just side one of Copper Blue. A few tracks from this as well, but the totallyy unexpected highlight was an amazing rendition of 'Chartered Trips' off Zen Arcade; certainly not a song I ever thought I'd ever hear performed live.

I've got Grant Hart's new LP on order, and it should arrive any day. You've a lot to live up here Grant, but I'm sure you're up to the task!


Insider: Gerry Bradley's Life in the IRA
Insider: Gerry Bradley's Life in the IRA
by Gerry Bradley
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.19

5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very redolent of the old Belfast, 14 April 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This book was very well written I thought, and an exploration of the mindset of the IRA as seen through a prolific operator. I don't know if I would have enjoyed it as much if I didn't have a good knowledge of Belfast's geography: I remember than when I lived in Belfast 20+ years ago that the places described in the book were very sinister to an outsider. Unity Flats in particular fascinated me. An awful, run down yet very small place right at the foot of the Shankill. What must it be like to live there? I used to think as I hurried past. It was the sort of place where, even 20 years after the bulk of the events described in this book you felt anything could happen, at any time.

This part of Belfast has changed beyond recognition, with the Divis and Unity Flats gone, and the roads completely remodelled so that it's impossible to imagine now how menacing Millfield and Upper Library Street were. The book evoked those feelings, unique to Belfast for me, better than anything I've ever read.


Brighton Rock
Brighton Rock
by Graham Greene
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.29

5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding, 20 Mar. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Brighton Rock (Paperback)
One of the best novels I've ever read, and I don't normally bother with 'thrillers'. The grimy atmosphere draws the reader in so that you feel you're almost there, which given that Pinky is just about the most malevolent character in any novel I've read (except perhaps Alex, O my brothers), is not somewhere you want to be.


Disco Down
Disco Down
Offered by thebookcommunity
Price: £13.45

3.0 out of 5 stars Bought in error, 20 Mar. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Disco Down (Audio CD)
The song is great, but unfortunately I ordered it when I was very drunk and failed to notice that it was a CD and not a vinyl single. As I don't 'do' CDs at all and am a vinyl enthusiast to the core, this was a slightly embarrassing mistake!


Parallel Lines: Or, Journeys on the Railway of Dreams
Parallel Lines: Or, Journeys on the Railway of Dreams
by Ian Marchant
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.19

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An unexpectedly great read., 25 Aug. 2010
I never expected to find any book that combined a good approximation of my own worldview with an understanding of my principal vice, that is being a railway enthusiast. From punk rock to politics to the platform end this book chimed readily with both my outlook and many of my experiences. As a basher it was good to see even just the use of this term in print, and that Ian duly recognises that bashers are at the top of the enthusiast tree! It is also good to see railway enthusiasts (in fact just used as an example of anyone with any hobby that isn't football, cars or shopping) treated sympathetically and in the context of what appears to have evolved into a very harsh, intolerant, and above all 'cool', society. I should point out that I am extremely cool myself, but in a nice way!


The Death of Grass (Penguin Modern Classics)
The Death of Grass (Penguin Modern Classics)
by John Christopher
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.19

37 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent and shocking piece of work, 17 Mar. 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I've been wanting to read this for ages, so jumped at the chance to buy it now it's been reprinted. I read it in an afternoon and was not disappointed. If anyone's intending to buy it then don't whatever you do read the introduction, which is so laden with spoilers that it was the only thing that reduced my enjoyment of the whole thing in any way.

I've read in many places, including one of the other reviews here, comparisons with The Day of the Triffids, saying that this is much more realistic and that TDOTT is all stiff upper lips and cosy catastrophe. I find this a little unfair because Wyndham's work is set in a world where there are almost no survivors, and as such bears little comparison with the disaster unfolding here. Indeed, Wyndham's main character explicitly realises at one point in TDOTT how different (and bloody) things would be if 10 or 15 per cent of the population had survived, so he has that base covered. Rather than comparisons with TDOTT, which must come more from the fact that both books come from the same era than from anything else, this book made me think more than anything else of a prequel to Cormac McCarthy's deeply disturbing The Road.

In short TDOG is excellent, but has not toppled TDOTT from my Number One for this type of fiction.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 6, 2012 12:31 PM GMT


Page: 1