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John Atkinson "ManxTog" (Douglas, Isle of Man)
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Aggressor: (Nick Stone Book 8)
Aggressor: (Nick Stone Book 8)
by Andy McNab
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.39

2.0 out of 5 stars Slow Burner, 15 Jun 2014
This book is a slow burner; all the action is in the last third, the rest is a big build-up. Readable for all that, but less so than it should have been.


Mosquito: Menacing the Reich: Combat Action in the Twin-Engine Wooden Wonder of World War II
Mosquito: Menacing the Reich: Combat Action in the Twin-Engine Wooden Wonder of World War II
by Martin W. Bowman
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars As good as being there ..., 16 Feb 2013
I feel that this book succeeds in conveying the experience of what it was like to take part in flying operations with the Mosquito aircraft. The many accounts are vivid and detailed and contain the sort of facts needed to get one into the cockpit and flying the machine. The sounds and smells are recounted as well as operational details of exactly how targets were attacked, altitudes, approach and navigational details, etc. There is also a lot of detail concerning the various problems of flying with Merlin engines and nursing damaged planes back to a friendly airfield. All in all, an excellent account of what it was really like.


Ultimate Risk
Ultimate Risk
by Adam Raphael
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Informative account of a disaster, 28 Mar 2011
This review is from: Ultimate Risk (Paperback)
Getting one's head round the events that led to 32,00-odd Names at Lloyd's losing their shirts is not an easy matter, but this book fills in a great deal of detail. Both myself and Mr Raphael were insurance underwriters. I don't know how much he lost, but I began in 1987 with capital of 100,000 and by 1994 they had lost more than 530,000. We will never know the full figure since the 'book' was bought by that nice man Warren Buffett. What is clear is that the inner circle at Lloyd's had full knowledge of the potential for massive losses from claims for asbestos injury but did nothing, even missing an opportunity in 1982 to leave the 1979 year of account open. That would have meant a rescue of some kind then, but instead more than 20,000 new Names were recruited without being told of the threatening tidal wave of losses. What became clear later is that Lloyd's had misrepresented its claim to have a thorough accounting system and audit to new Names in the brochures. A proper audit would have revealed the true state of affairs. At least 15 Names committed suicide. In a trial in 2000 the judge said that there had been a catalogue of failings and incompetence at Lloyd's that was staggering. This book does much to explain exactly what went wrong. Although the book was written in 1994, I should add that now, in 2011, Lloyd's continues to pursue Names for money in the full knowledge that it was its own failings, as a self-regulator, that led directly to the massive losses. Any other organisation would have been publicly shamed and forced to apologise, but Lloyd's seems curiously above any feelings of conscience and has become arrogant in denying any responsibility.


Mahler: Symphony No.2
Mahler: Symphony No.2
Offered by EliteDigital UK
Price: 22.95

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Solti excels, 28 Mar 2011
This review is from: Mahler: Symphony No.2 (Audio CD)
This is dramatic music, and Solti excels, bringing his operatic experience to bear. The quieter movements are full of feeling. One of my favourite performances of any symphony.


The Secret Diaries of Abigail Titmuss: How to play the fame game and come out on top
The Secret Diaries of Abigail Titmuss: How to play the fame game and come out on top
by Abi Titmuss
Edition: Paperback
Price: 7.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Want to know how the media works?, 2 Dec 2009
This book should be fronted by a quote from Oscar Wilde: 'I can resist anything but temptation.' It is the story of someone caught up in events and swept along without much obvious attempt at control. Perhaps what saved Abi was her long-term ambition to be an actress, but one wonders how she would cope if stardom arrived with its cocaine and alcohol. Will she plumb the depths again? One good aspect of the book is its account of how the camera fell in love with Abi. Like, many celebrities, she has that 'star' quality that makes her leap off the page or screen, but finds public reaction bewildering. An interesting part of the book is her failure to come to terms with this. She sells it as revealing how the media, in particular the red-top media, works. Celebrities and the currant bun have an incestuous relationship, each feeding off the other in an orgy of revelation and denial, with circulation the prize. The popular press have little regard for the truth. If there's a good story and a liar to back it up the red-tops will buy it. The occasional libel action hurts but for the celebrity it's just another fistful of dollars. Abi ends this episode in her life with a property portfolio and the beginning of a new career, and the red-tops look for new sensations; and a willing public will pay for it all.


Miss Austen Regrets (BBC) [2008] [DVD]
Miss Austen Regrets (BBC) [2008] [DVD]
Dvd ~ Olivia Williams
Price: 6.53

30 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Too sick to marry?, 3 May 2008
This excellent and entertaining film unfortunately misses out a lot of medical evidence that could explain why Jane chose not to marry. She was a late child, being 4 weeks overdue, and would have been frail and ill in the first weeks of life, her christening in church being delayed for almost 4 months. Postmaturity can lead to immune deficiency in later life and at the age of Jane developed chronic conjunctivitis which recurred throughout her life. In 1813 she began to suffer from neuralgia, an extremely painful condition affecting the cheek and upper jaw, and Fanny Knight's younger sister Lizzie described how sometimes she saw Aunt Jane walking along the path from Chawton village to the Great House, and obviously in pain, "with head a little to one side, and sometimes a very small cushion pressed against her cheek, if she were suffering from face-ache, as she not unfrequently did in later life". One medical text describes the pain as "devastating", and that for some patients who suffer frequent attacks, "the pain may be so intolerable as to make life a burden". Jane's final illness if often diagnosed as Addison's disease, but this does not explain the night sweats she reported, which are a feature of Hodgkin's Lymphoma. Jane's description of her face in March, 1817, as being 'black and white and every wrong colour' is typical of Addison's disease". The hyperpigmentation or tanning of the skin associated with Addison's disease, however, is inconsistent with her being described as "very pale" shortly afterwards in April. Cope also suggests that "there is no disease other than Addison's disease that could present a face that was "black and white" and at the same time give rise to the other symptoms described in her letters". He had overlooked Hodgkin's disease. Idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura, is a rare syndrome associated with Hodgkin's and is a complication that may occur in the advanced or terminal stage of the disease. It may affect the face and can be devastating to the patient. The symptoms begin with a scattering of red spots, which gradually progress to purple, then darken again, and in some cases turning black. A few days later the spots gradually begin to resolve, and change in colour like a bruise, turning green before fading to a yellowish brown and disappearing. This is consistent with Jane's letter of 25 March describing her looks as "recovering again," and in April, they had gone completely when she was described as "very pale." The "black and white and every wrong colour" of her face describes this process in contrast to the underlying severe anaemia. New crops may soon appear and the process begins again, and in Jane's letter of 27 May, the purpura had returned.

So it may be that Jane had an unconscious sense that she was not strong enough to withstand the rigours of child-bearing and wanted to live with the support of her family.


Swift Jumbo turner
Swift Jumbo turner

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars How big is jumbo?, 14 Feb 2008
How can I order such an item when there is no clue to how big it is or what it looks like?


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