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J. M. Gibbard (Norwich, UK)
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Liberon WB500 500ml Wood Bleacher
Liberon WB500 500ml Wood Bleacher
Price: 9.42

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Water stains on brand new oak worktop, 17 Feb 2013
Our builders/kitchen fitters left water standing on our 40mm oak worktops which had had only one coat of finishing oil applied. Consequently we found dark stains, almost as if someone had dropped black ink from a fountain pen on the wood and it had soaked in. We were distraught. Googling brought us here and we read these reviews. For a little over a 10 we thought we'd give it a go. We tested on a piece of off-cut worktop that had been left outside and had blackened in places. Sanding down the surface (to remove the layer of oil) the bleach was applied with a small brush and left to dry. A little damp foam pad was used to wash out the bleach and quickly dried with paper towel. Sanding down again, a quick rub with a tack cloth and it was ready to re-oil. We used Liberon finishing oil again over the top and you would never know there had been any damage. It was miraculous.

To be fair to others reading this, the stain was small (no bigger than a couple of 5p coins spread out) and fresh - we applied the bleach within 24 hours of the stain appearing. We're keeping a bottle around for the inevitable emergencies that will happen to even the most careful owners of these beautiful but demanding oak worktops.

TIP: Decant a little bleach into a small pot to allow you to apply it generously to the brush bristles. Also, do sand the surface off before applying it to allow it to get into the natural grain where the stain has occurred.


The Kent Downs
The Kent Downs
by Dan Tuson
Edition: Paperback
Price: 15.62

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An important and informative work for an ancient landscape., 14 Feb 2008
This review is from: The Kent Downs (Paperback)
Tuson's book covers an often forgotten environment in a corridor of England providing ready access to the near-continent. That the Downs are not as majestic as other upland areas of England matters not as Tuson details the considerable flora, fauna, geology and people of the area through time. Dan is local to the area and the one criticism I would offer is that the book does require quite a familiarity with the geography of the region to get the most out of the considerable colloqial references. That said, with reference to a good map this shouldn't dampen one's enjoyment. Treated as an end-to-end read or a reference point before/after a walk in the hills if you have in any way wondered about any part of this ancient landscape you will, like myself, be more than satisfied with this book.


Communicating Design: Developing Web Site Documentation for Design and Planning
Communicating Design: Developing Web Site Documentation for Design and Planning
by Dan M. Brown
Edition: Paperback

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Real world application of user-interface documentation, 21 Mar 2007
Dan's book is of profound relevance to anyone involved in producing web design documentation. During his day-long tutorial workshop at User Experience 2006 in London Dan taught me more about producing effective and compelling user-experience documentation than anything I'd learned at any time since 2001 and it's all in this book. His is the most comprehensive guide to allowing our work to inform and shape the creation of ground-breaking information architecture and yet it has been written in an accessible, friendly and authoritative manner. This book and Dan's regular contributions to Boxes and Arrows and the IA institute are essential reading for aspiring and practising user-experience professionals.


Panasonic TX-28PM11  Television
Panasonic TX-28PM11 Television

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great value 100Hz Widescreen ... a true Sony-beater, 22 Nov 2004
Choosing a traditional CRT widescreen TV is not easy. With several options to consider ... screen width, refresh rate, SCART support, audio options ...
I chose this TV based on the single most important aspect of TV viewing. The picture. At 28", some reviewers have considered 100Hz to be a bit over the top. The 100Hz figure means that the screen refreshes one hundred times per second - normal TVs refresh only fifty times per second. The increased rate means pictures are sharper and moving action is rendered more smoothly with less of the glowing 'artefacts' such as a white halo around a football during live matches. I decided to choose a TV without in-built iDTV (digital or 'Freeview') capabilities as I already had a Sony box and the picture through this via a decent SCART is awesome. The picture switches accurately from 4:3 to 16:9 though the occasional letter-box style music video cause the dynamic switching to play-up.
Beyond the picture, the sound is more than adequate. A reasonable base reproduction from the in-built speakers means that those of us that have not yet invested in a home theatre kit are not disappointed. I've connected mine via the phono outputs to my Rotel amplifier and Tannoy speakers and this absolutely belts out the audio.
The menu system is relatively simple, at least it's all 'on screen', allowing you to view the picture whilst you tweak settings for image and audio quality. It found all of my local stations and included some weaker feeds with no problem and in under a couple of minutes. The start-up time (from pressing the power button to a picture appearing) is shorter than many sets I've seen recently, even from 'cold'.
The only downside is the lack of SCART sockets. These days having two input/output sockets is simply not enough. I've got a relatively basic set-up, DVD player, VCR and Digital box. The digibox and DVD both have RGB outputs too ... it's not the best in the price range.
Other than that the TV looks great on its stand, it links in well with Qlink kit (includes Sony's SmartLink) so adding decent peripheral kit will really enhance your set-up. The standard IR (infra-red) control codes mean that my Sony box controls the volume and channel switching too so I can even benefit from having one remote in my hand.
Keep your eyes open for price offers on this, in my humble opinion it's certainly the best in its price range. If you've got a quality digital box already this TV will more than do it justice.


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