Profile for Genly Ai > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Genly Ai
Top Reviewer Ranking: 94,569
Helpful Votes: 98

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Genly Ai

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3
pixel
THE BUILDINGS OF ENGLAND. BE 41. GLOUCESTERSHIRE. THE VALE AND THE FOREST OF DEAN
THE BUILDINGS OF ENGLAND. BE 41. GLOUCESTERSHIRE. THE VALE AND THE FOREST OF DEAN

5.0 out of 5 stars A Great book, 16 May 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I collect Pevsners - even though he gets a bit lost with the Romanesque and uses stupid terms such as "barbaric". There was little understanding of how Romanesque churches worked in those days. They worshipped the 13th century and the18th century which I find rather boring and crass.


Prosperous
Prosperous
Price: £37.04

5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Record, 16 May 2014
This review is from: Prosperous (Audio CD)
This is an early record by the now established singer Christie Moore. The first track slowly shades into "Tabhair dom do lamh" or Give me your Hand in English. There are some tracks with a background such as "Lock Hospital", the original version of "Streets of Laredo" with a poor soldier cut down by syphalis and being buried - "The girls of the city were the ruin of me". There are also tributes to Woody Guthrie and his fellow commie Pete Seeger as well as upbeat Irish songs like "Spancilhill" and the "Hackler from Grouse Hall".


The Well Below the Valley
The Well Below the Valley
Price: £15.93

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My first Planxty, 17 Nov 2013
I remember buying this when I was nobutt a lass. It was my first album by Planxty and I loved it. I still love their sound and was lucky enough to see Andy Irvine live a few years ago. That was very special as I don't live in a large town and so get few chances to hear live performances.


Andy Irvine and Paul Brady
Andy Irvine and Paul Brady
Price: £12.29

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A beautiful haunting album, 16 Jan 2012
Probably one of my favourite albums of all time. Two excellent musicians with wonderful voices. The strange tones of the hurdy-gurdy add an extra layer to some of the songs. I've had this on tape from student days when I couldn't afford records (as they were then) but never found the album on CD until now.


The Assassin's Prayer: Mistress of the Art of Death, Adelia Aguilar series 4
The Assassin's Prayer: Mistress of the Art of Death, Adelia Aguilar series 4
by Ariana Franklin
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Amusing and fast-paced but no real mystery, 29 Sep 2011
The previous books were set in various parts of England (Cambridge area, Thames valley and Somerset levels) but this traces a route through France and Italy to end up in Sicily. Adelia has to accompany a young princess travelling to her wedding at Palermo. Among the large retinue lurks an old enemy determined to murder her but also keen to cause her a great deal of trouble first.

As with the other books this is to a large extent a comedy. Light on history and with rather cartoon characters - but it is fun all the same. Several of the usual crew turn up for the long trip (including the smelly dog) plus a set of new oddities to help and hinder. We meet the king's foolish sons, a downtrodden maid, some unpleasant churchmen, an Irish pirate and Cathars depicted (following a popular misreading of Montaillou) as a medieval hippy commune. Norman Sicily is shown as an enlightened state where different religions co-exist though dark clouds are gathering to destroy the idyll. Pleasant myths but a pinch of salt is needed.

Two main problems. Compared to the previous books this one does not have a real mystery. There are bodies but the journey keeps moving the characters on, leaving any chance of detection behind. The threat is to Adelia herself which robs her of the distancing that a good fictional detective needs. The other difficulty is the abrupt and partly unresolved ending.

The same book is also published under the title 'A Murderous Procession'.


Ajax: The Definitive Guide
Ajax: The Definitive Guide
by Anthony T. Holdener
Edition: Paperback
Price: £32.50

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars More a brain dump than a book, 6 Sep 2011
Most O'Reilly computing books are good introductions to the subjects. This one, I'm afraid, falls a long way short of the expected standard. It could be titled 'Everything I know about anything remotely connected with Ajax'. It's a large book (900 plus pages) composed of filler plus the small scraps of code you need to use Ajax. If you don't know your way around html and xml technologies, there are better introductions and it is way to early to start thinking about using Ajax. More space is filled with pieces about web-page design and one or two application areas that the author has picked up on. None of it seems to be in any particular order - more 'and here's another thing'. If you don't become lost you'll certainly soon be bored.

Overall I think that the book is a product on a fairly trivial idea that was hailed as a great new technology. It was really just a development of already existing technologies (xml and javascript) so there was really not much to write about.


The Redemption of Alexander Seaton
The Redemption of Alexander Seaton
by Shona MacLean
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good story with an unusual setting, 31 Aug 2011
Northern Scotland in the 1620s. Seaton, a young man who has failed to become a minister of the Kirk because of one indiscretion is working as a schoolmaster in a small town. On the way home from an evening with friends he rescues a man who has been attacked. The victim dies overnight and suspicions fall on one of Seaton's friends. To clear his name Seaton must find the real killer but doing so rakes over both the dark secrets of the town and his own past.

This is an interesting case in a very unusual setting. The Kirk is established in Scotland but there are many Catholic families who are suspected of plotting with foreign powers. Seaton is a strong supporter of the Kirk but elements of his past make his situation more complex.


The Saint-Florentin Murders: The Nicolas Le Floch Investigations 5
The Saint-Florentin Murders: The Nicolas Le Floch Investigations 5
by Jean-Francois Parot
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.46

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Parot keeps up the good work, 31 Aug 2011
Several books in and the standard is still maintained. Like most French crime novels they are full of quirky characters but with Parot they don't grate as much as with others. Not do only the bloody deeds and unwholesome locations keep coming but so do the recipes. Nicholas has to adapt to a new regime, suspicious of his old connections. The problems of working in a world that relied entirely upon patronage are well set out and an integral part of the stories. I'm hoping the tales can make it all the way to the revolution.


The Innocent Mage: Kingmaker, Kingbreaker Book 1
The Innocent Mage: Kingmaker, Kingbreaker Book 1
by Karen Miller
Edition: Paperback

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Much better than expected, 31 Aug 2011
I picked this book up in a sale, not expecting a great deal. There are countless fantasy novels; most of them cut and paste, change the names. It turned out much better than expected. I liked Asher, the main character. He's forthright and has no respect for titles and flummery, which is a refreshing change as these sort of books often tend towards fawning. It's not a fast paced action story, more a slow development though fairly simple at the core. The author plays on common tropes but twists them enough to be interesting. It does lack the cynicism of the best but is fine light reading.


Grey Souls
Grey Souls
by Adriana Hunter
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars A haunting and beautiful book, 30 May 2011
This review is from: Grey Souls (Hardcover)
A young girl is found murdered close to a northern French village during the First World War. The detective assigned to the case looks back, years later at the investigation and his own life.

Though the framework is that of a detective story with a murder, suspects and a detective it is really much more. The case is told in retrospect by the detective questioning his conducts and examining how the investigation meshed with his personal concerns. It is a tragic story from many points of view, not only the sad death of the victim but other equally poignant losses. The war is there as a distant rumble, ever present and influencing matters but never taking centre stage.

The translation reads very fluently and seems to capture the essence of the story.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3