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The Intention Experiment: Use Your Thoughts to Change the World
The Intention Experiment: Use Your Thoughts to Change the World
by Lynne McTaggart
Edition: Hardcover

80 of 81 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Real Deal, 23 April 2007
Lynne McTaggart is an award-winning journalist and a best-selling author of "The Field". Although not a trained scientist, she has an uncanny ability to bring complex quantum theory to a practical language that makes sense. "The Intention Experiment" expands on the concepts of purposeful consciousness she introduced in her previous book. Unlike other works that simply offer "New Age" fluff to entice a public hungry for hope, "The Intention Experiment" grounds the contention that thoughts have an innate power to affect living organisms on impeccable double-blind studies conducted by eminent scientists. The ability to change the rate of growth in cancer cells by guided imagery, the effects of distant prayer on t cell count of HIV+ patients, and how blessed water can change its molecular structure, are only a few of the fascinating topics McTaggart covers in her book. Readers can learn about the power of mind-body without having to question the legitimacy of her sources.

"The Intention Experiment" is one of the best books in the genre of what is known as "intention science".
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 5, 2013 1:53 PM BST


The Shadow Of The Wind
The Shadow Of The Wind
by Carlos Ruiz Zafon
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.91

7 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Gem of Fiction From Pure Genius, 15 April 2007
This review is from: The Shadow Of The Wind (Paperback)
"The Shadow of the Wind" is one of those rare books that entice readers to face their existential fears with the power of human dignity. Rather than describe the content of the story as other reviewers have so aptly done, I want to focus on the psychological fabric that Carlos Ruiz Safón weaves for us. As a clinical psychologist and author of a psychological novel, I can arguably state that Safón is one of the most gifted wordsmiths of this decade. And I dare say that, if he continues to develop his craft, he could inheret the best of Dumas and Proust for the twenty-first century.

Through his cast of characters, Safón explores the depth of evil, the bitter-sweetness of our first unrequited love, and the invincibility of the human spirit when confronted with darkness. Rather than feeling pity for the emotional and physical traumas that his characters endure, Safón exalts them to serve as examples of how honor overwhelms shame, and how forgiveness subdues bitter rage.

Safón's book exceeded my expectations and inspired me to become a better writer.


Law of Attraction: The Science of Attracting More of What You Want and Less of What You Don't Want
Law of Attraction: The Science of Attracting More of What You Want and Less of What You Don't Want
by Michael J. Losier
Edition: Paperback

62 of 62 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Rare Exception That Actually Delivers, 14 April 2007
Unlike many of the "feel good" books that uplift your spirits with hope to ultimately bring you down with simplistic claims that do not work, Michael Losier's "Law of Attraction" provides practical methods that can be tested for their validity. As a clinical psychologist I specialize in how cultural beliefs affect the immune system. Consequently, I am profoundly aware of how our thinking can influence our wellness, but more importantly, how beliefs are resistant to change because of our fear of joy. With a background in Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP), Michael Losier takes these resistances into account when he offers solutions to change our deprivation mentality. Based on my clinical experience, I can go a step further and argue that, in addition to the suggestions made in "Law of Attraction", when a person begins to see positive results based on their new approach to challenges, there is an empowering effect that enhances immune function and wellness.

I strongly recommend this book for those who are ready to give up beliefs and behaviors that do not serve them well. "Law of Attraction" is an excellent tool for positive change.


The Pilgrimage: A Contemporary Quest for Ancient Wisdom
The Pilgrimage: A Contemporary Quest for Ancient Wisdom
by Paulo Coelho
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.39

28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Private Journey to Explore Self, 5 April 2007
Although "The Pilgrimage" is not Paulo Coelho's most exalted work, it is still a wonderful plunge into the mystical journey. In this book, he chronicles his own experiences on the road to Santiago de Compostela in the region of Galicia known as Celtic Spain. The journey is rich with allegory reflecting how we must face our own fears in order to engage in what he calls "the good fight". The Pilgrimage is reminiscent of Carlos Castañeda's apprenticeship with his mentor Don Juan. Paulo's guide is the enigmatic Petrus, who teaches him to face his own limitations and to break him from the "modernist" notion that our busy work is more important than exploring our inner world. There is a sweet discovery about the book that brings presence to a wisdom that includes mystical exercises worthy of our attention.


Entering The Castle
Entering The Castle
by Caroline Myss
Edition: Audio CD
Price: £16.94

44 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Liberating St. Teresa from the Inquisitors, and Much More, 1 April 2007
This review is from: Entering The Castle (Audio CD)
Before commenting on Caroline's "Entering the Castle", it is important to note how her book is based on sixteenth-century mystic St. Teresa de Avila (Teresa Sanchez de Cepeda). When St. Teresa wrote her theological treatises, the Church did not consider women competent to be authors in general, nor to write about theology, in particular. Although in her book "The Interior Castle" (Las Moradas), St. Teresa proved theologians of the time wrong on both counts, she had to write in a circumspect and self-deprecating style in order to pass the scrutiny of the Inquisitors. These limitations made her writings cumbersome and somewhat fragmented.
In her CD "Entering the Castle", Caroline Myss has liberated St. Teresa from the suffocating Inquisition, and has brought sixteenth-century psychology of the spirit to the twenty-first century. Caroline's CD offers courage, methodology and hope about how, independent of religious affiliation, we can enter our own "castle" to navigate our spiritual journey. More importantly however, Caroline very wisely suggests, we must be "mystics out of the monastery" so that we can reach others with the wealth of spirit required to advance global consciousness. As a clinical psychologist who teaches mystics wellness for their arduous journey to find union with the divine, I strongly recommend "Entering the Castle", for anyone who is seeking spiritual guidance that goes beyond New Age "quick fix".


Entering the Castle: An Inner Path to God and Your Soul
Entering the Castle: An Inner Path to God and Your Soul
by Caroline Myss
Edition: Hardcover

43 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Liberating St. Teresa from the Inquisitors, and Much More, 27 Mar 2007
Before commenting on Caroline's "Entering the Castle", it is important to note how her book is based on sixteenth-century mystic St. Teresa de Avila (Teresa Sanchez de Cepeda). When St. Teresa wrote her theological treatises, the Church did not consider women competent to be authors in general, nor to write about theology, in particular. Although in her book "The Interior Castle" (Las Moradas), St. Teresa proved theologians of the time wrong on both counts, she had to write in a circumspect and self-deprecating style in order to pass the scrutiny of the Inquisitors. These limitations made her writings cumbersome and somewhat fragmented.

In her book "Entering the Castle", Caroline Myss has liberated St. Teresa from the suffocating Inquisition, and has brought sixteenth-century psychology of the spirit to the twenty-first century. Caroline's book offers courage, methodology and hope about how, independent of religious affiliation, we can enter our own "castle" to navigate our spiritual journey. More importantly however, Caroline very wisely suggests, we must be "mystics out of the monastery" so that we can reach others with the wealth of spirit required to advance global consciousness. As a clinical psychologist who teaches mystics wellness on their arduous journey to find union with the divine, I strongly recommend "Entering the Castle", for anyone who is seeking spiritual guidance that goes beyond New Age "quick fix".


The Secret
The Secret
by Rhonda Byrne
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £11.00

371 of 407 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A Word to the Wise..., 20 Mar 2007
This review is from: The Secret (Hardcover)
I am commenting on The Secret as a clinical psychologist who specializes in how cultural and spiritual beliefs affect health as well as the author of a book about converging science and mysticism to navigate our personal journey. First, The Secret is a compilation of opinions from a group of professionals in several fields, rather than a book by the author. It would be more accurate for Ms. Byrne to present herself as the editor, rather than the author of the book. Having said that, it is important to distinguish between wishful thinking and mind-body science. Although the concepts expounded in the book are beautiful examples of what we could achieve if we explored our potential, it leaves the reader with "feel-good" platitudes, by failing to convey that simply wishing something does not attract anything other than expectations that lead to disappointment. As a scientist, I have seen the mind bypass biology in miraculous ways, but this does not happen by just wishing and waiting for "the laws of attraction" to work. Instead, change requires honoring commitments, not blaming others for our failures, assessing the self-sabotaging that surface when self-esteem is compromised, and realistically defining goals.

The success of this book shows how hungry we are for someone to tell us that change happens magically without having to confront our demons and without taking responsibility for the life we created with our actions.

While I wish Ms. Byrne the greatest success, I want to caution the reader that if "wishful thinking" does not attract what you want, do not blame yourself, because it was only thoughts without action.
Comment Comments (12) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 17, 2014 11:38 AM GMT


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