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Dr. H. A. Jones "Howard Jones" (Wales, UK)
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Chaos, Creativity and Cosmic Consciousness
Chaos, Creativity and Cosmic Consciousness
by Ralph Abraham
Edition: Paperback
Price: 10.49

4.0 out of 5 stars Discussion of some fundamental problems in science and spirituality, 27 July 2014
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Chaos, Creativity and Cosmic Consciousness, by Rupert Sheldrake, Terence McKenna and Ralph Abraham, Park Street Press (Inner Traditions), Rochester, Vermont; 1992, 2001; 208 ff.

In this book we eavesdrop as it were on a discussion between the three authors – a discussion that had gone on since 1982 and, more intensively, in public and private discussions at the Esalen Institute, California, in 1989 and 1990. For readers, it could be regarded as a companion volume to the discussion by Ervin Laszlo, Stanislav Grof and Peter Russell published in 1999 as ‘The Consciousness Revolution’. Ralph Abraham is a professor of mathematics at the University of California, Santa Cruz; the late Terence McKenna was an explorer, philosopher and ethnologist; and Rupert Sheldrake is a biochemist and plant physiologist who studied, taught and carried out research respectively at Cambridge, England, at Harvard, and at the International Crops Research Institute in Hyderabad, India.

On page 1, Sheldrake confronts us with a fundamental scientific dilemma: Are there eternal and unchanging laws of the universe, or is every facet of the universe constantly changing, developing, evolving – including the ‘laws of physics’? What then was the role of the Big Bang, if such an event occurred? Are there unchanging universal templates as suggested by Plato, or is there continual ongoing creativity, as suggested by Henri Bergson?

Chapters Two and Three deal with how chaos – both in mathematical theory and in practice – can lead to definitive solutions, and how these ideas relate to human creativity and imagination. The latter chapter introduces us to C.H. Waddington’s concept of chreodes – grooves or runnels which our speakers speculate exist within the (hypothetical) morphogenetic fields. There is an interesting discussion about how the appearance of Jesus can be viewed as an example of either an ascending or descending developmental process.

The next chapter debates the idea of a World Soul (after Plotinus), related once again to the role of chaos, which is followed by a discussion of the nature of vision and our other senses. Sheldrake discusses his idea of the sensation of vision being outside of the body but rather located where we say the objects we see actually lie. Chapter Six will be controversial I’m sure and is highly speculative: it deals with non-human intelligences and discarnate beings, and ranges over crop circles and the battle between good and evil.

The final chapters deal with the unconscious, the collapse of faith in both religion and scientism, and the need for re-education of humanity in the sacralization of Earth if we are avoid the apocalypse and the extinction of humankind from the planet. The overall message is not gloomy but should serve as a warning for those in positions of power who still have greed and egotism as their main, if not their only, goals in their time on Earth.

The book concludes with a useful Glossary of some of the technical words and a short Bibliography but there is no Index.

Howard Jones is the author of The World as Spirit and Evolution of Consciousness


DDR 361 unmounted mint / never hinged 1953 700 yeArs FrAnkfurt A.D. ODer (Stamps for collectors)
DDR 361 unmounted mint / never hinged 1953 700 yeArs FrAnkfurt A.D. ODer (Stamps for collectors)
Offered by Prophila GmbH
Price: 2.70

5.0 out of 5 stars A fine stamp from the old East Germany, 27 July 2014
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A lovely stamp of Frankfurt cathedral paying tribute to its 700 year history


Karl Jenkins: Motets
Karl Jenkins: Motets
Price: 9.36

5.0 out of 5 stars A fine collection of a cappella choral works, 27 July 2014
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This review is from: Karl Jenkins: Motets (Audio CD)
This is a collection of 19 motets, some of them taken from previously issued CDs (‘The Armed Man’, ‘The Peacemakers’ ‘Requiem’, ‘Stabat Mater’, ‘Adiemus’, ‘Gloria’, ‘Stella Natalis’) but in new a cappella arrangements and sung by Polyphony under the direction of Stephen Layton. The other tracks are of original recordings. I particularly like a cappella recordings as the purity of the human voice comes through without being obliterated in places by thick orchestral textures. If you enjoy this composer's melodies and harmonies, you will love this CD. Polyphony make a beautiful sound and it's refreshing to hear the different arrangements of pieces I already know quite well. It's like hearing Barber's Adagio in its choral setting for the first time.


Dead Men Talking: Afterlife Communication from World War I
Dead Men Talking: Afterlife Communication from World War I
by Michael Tymn
Edition: Paperback
Price: 11.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another in a fine series of afterlife books by Michael Tymn, 26 July 2014
This is an altogether upbeat, reassuring and enlightening book with many insights into discarnate existence from those ‘on the spot.’ The original texts are interspersed with informative commentary from the author. Michael Tymn has built up a fine reputation in the past decade or so for the books he has written about the continuing existence of the soul in the afterlife. His books, together with those of Californian Professor of Religion, Stafford Betty, present such a convincing insight into the true nature of mortal death that only the most disparaging of sceptics could not take comfort from them. There is absolutely no way the information in Tymn's (and Betty's) books could have been obtained other than by communication from the discarnate soul through a medium.
- Howard A. Jones, Ph.D..
Author of Evolution of Consciousness


Berlin (West) 43 unmounted mint / never hinged 1949 Berlin Buildings (Stamps for collectors)
Berlin (West) 43 unmounted mint / never hinged 1949 Berlin Buildings (Stamps for collectors)
Offered by Prophila GmbH
Price: 1.60

5.0 out of 5 stars Mint German stamps, 26 July 2014
Fine stamp, perfect condition, excellent service from Prophila


Self-Actualizing Cosmos: The Akaksha Revolution in Science
Self-Actualizing Cosmos: The Akaksha Revolution in Science
by Ervin Laszlo
Edition: Paperback
Price: 10.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Laszlo revisits his Akashic field concept, 21 July 2014
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The Self-Actualizing Cosmos: The Akasha revolution in science and human consciousness, by Ervin Laszlo; Inner Traditions, Rochester, Vermont, 2014, 208 ff

Scientists, philosophers and religious adherents alike have long embraced the concept of a unifying non-material energy field, a so-called ‘deep dimension’ to reality – except that scientists have found a rational interpretation for this concept only within the last century while theists have been inspired by such a notion for millennia. Several scientists and philosophers have described this energy in their own individual terms – Bucke by ‘cosmic consciousness’, Jung by ‘collective unconscious’, Sheldrake by ‘morphic field’ and, in philosophy, by Plato with his ‘Forms’ and ‘Ideas’ and Kant’s vision of a world of the ‘phenomenal’ and the ‘noumenal’; it is David Bohm’s ‘implicate order’. ‘The world we observe is illusory, ephemeral, and short-lived, while the deep dimension is real, eternal and eternally unchanging’.

I believe Laszlo first introduced his own term, ‘akashic field’, to general readers in his book ‘Science and the Akashic Field’ of a decade ago, though his thoughts had been moving in that direction for at least another decade before that. ‘Akasha’ is a Sanskrit term meaning ‘aether’ or ‘space’ and the concept formed part of ancient Hindu philosophy found in the Upanishads. It is the foundation of the created universe. The akashic record is regarded as the spiritual domain in which all the events of the universe are written through all time. The idea is beautifully summarized on p.2: the akasha is the underlying foundation of the cosmos that creates the conditions for the emergence of life and consciousness; it is complementary to prana – the activating energy.

The author states that the more enlightened scientists (especially quantum physicists and biologists) have come to realize that a new paradigm is needed to explain the phenomena of the world at the molecular and organismal level – matter, life and consciousness are all entangled and constantly interactive. Nonlocality or ‘action-at-a-distance’ (two objects influencing one another without any obvious connection between them) is something we are all familiar with in the case of gravity or magnets. But, as Laszlo says, it applies much more widely than that. In the case of consciousness we find it in telepathy and shared death experiences. Furthermore, nonlocality applies across time as well as across space. This cosmic energy field, or akashic field as Laszlo calls it, is like a giant fine web that envelops the whole universe: touch one part, and it all responds – and goes on responding in the holofield through space-time. Matter and minds together form a holistic interactive system; ‘there is no separation between components and their interaction’. Every individual creature is itself an example of coherence within its being.

The second part of this book recounts discussions between Laszlo and other proponents of similar ideas, and then spiritually oriented scientists present their take on the akashic field concept in short articles. This book provides a much deeper explanation at a more sophisticated scientific level than Laszlo’s previous book on the akashic field, which could easily be read by non-scientists. I think they would have rather more difficulty understanding the arguments here. In summary, the evolution of this akashic field concept (or whatever other term is used to describe the cosmic spiritual field of the universe) leads to ‘a self-actualizing, self-organizing whole, where each part is in coherence with all others’. As usual, there is a list of References and further reading (somewhat shorter than before) and a useful Index.

Howard Jones is the author of The World as Spirit and Evolution of Consciousness


The Certainty of Eternity: The Story of Australia's Greatest Medium
The Certainty of Eternity: The Story of Australia's Greatest Medium
by L. C. Danby
Edition: Paperback
Price: 10.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Reassurance of our continuing discarnate existence in an engaging biography, 17 July 2014
The Certainty of Eternity by L.C. Danby, White Crow Books, Guildford, UK, 2013, 206 ff.

`This book is about Stan Walsh, one of Australia's most respected and talented physical mediums of the early 20th century'. So begins the Foreword to this biography of Walsh -`an ordinary carpenter' - written by L.C. Danby, one of the sitters in the séances that Walsh held in Melbourne in the 1920s and 1930s. In the Foreword, written by Danby's daughter, Jo, she tells us that Danby himself held séances at his home in the 1940s. Expressing reservations about many religions because of the human distortions added to them Jo says: `I especially like the spiritual teachings of the Native American who treat the forests, waterways and the air we breathe with the same reverence as they treat the life force of humans and animals.' In recent decades we have heard the same sentiments expressed by others, notably by the Catholic priest, Fr. Thomas Berry.

Many of the events recorded here are expressed in language that reflects that of the Bible, though this is a book about spiritualism not Christianity or Judaism. Walsh, a lifelong bachelor, was born in 1891 in the small township of Ararat in Victoria, Australia. He spent his adult life in Melbourne with his parents and a sister, and left his earthly body in 1939. He called himself a spiritualist at first but later, guided by Spirit, abandoned this description because there were an increasing number of dubious practitioners.

Early in the story, Danby describes how a sceptical Walsh was introduced to spiritualism by one of his friends, a Welsh bread-carrier called Herbert Jones and his favourite (inspirational) medium, Mrs Beames. At his first full home séance with Mrs Beames, Walsh found himself the recipient of a series of automatic writings. I found this inauspicious and humble introduction of Walsh's new powers quite engaging.

At a subsequent meeting, Walsh was introduced to his spirit guide - an Amerindian called Malocca. Walsh was now set to become a deep-trance medium. Danby is keen to emphasize the difference between mediumship dealing with spiritual matters and materialistic fortune-telling. Walsh, young and inexperienced, at first used his powers for material gain and was rebuked by Malocca for doing so. There is also an interesting incident described that illustrates the `speaking in tongues' referred to in the Bible when another of Walsh's spirit guides spoke to a group of strangers, through Walsh, in their native tongue. And there is a whole chapter given to `the power of thought' - a subject of great current interest with the number of books describing healing by prayer and intention - and others on apports and materializations, and on inspiration.
It is clear that many people found the information Walsh brought through from so many spirits inspiring and comforting, as it will be to readers of this book who have an open mind. This is an excellent and uplifting book. My only reservation would be concerning the negation of the possibility of reincarnation - contrary to a huge amount of physical evidence that this does indeed occur. But as a heart-warming story of a humble and gifted man, and in its reassuring insights into the afterworld, this book makes fascinating reading. The book has a very human approach to Walsh's biographical details, which helps the reader to take seriously the sometimes bizarre events in which he was involved.

Howard Jones is the author of The World as Spirit


Beowulf: A New Translation
Beowulf: A New Translation
by Seamus Heaney
Edition: Paperback
Price: 7.49

5.0 out of 5 stars A modern translation of a medieval Scandinavian epic, 14 July 2014
Beowulf, trans. by Seamus Heaney, Faber & Faber, 2000, 142 ff

This is a story of a Scandinavian prince. It was originally written in Anglo-Saxon or Old English sometime between the 7th and 10th centuries. Beowulf is the principal warrior in the land of the Geats in what is now southern Sweden; his aim is to rid the land of a man-eating monster called Grendel and, in order to do this, he must cross the sea to his lair in Denmark. His story is told both in the original and in this translation in poetic style, but not in the sort of rhyming poetry of Wordsworth or Coleridge. The English lines scan more like Welsh cynghanedd, or the Scandinavian epic Kalevala, or subsequently Longfellow’s story of Hiawatha – but without the strong trochaic rhythm. There is often internal alliteration within or between lines in one verse. Most of the verses have a marginal summary and these carry you through the story even on their own. For those who have read, or are intending to read, the books by Brian Bates – ‘The Real Middle-Earth’ or ‘The Way of Wyrd’ – or for those who have enjoyed the books or films based on the works of J.R.R. Tolkien, this work is highly recommended as background reading. Those who are interested in the events of this time in our history might like to read the magazines of The English Companions, to be found at [...]


Deanna Durbin - Christmas Holiday [DVD] [1944]
Deanna Durbin - Christmas Holiday [DVD] [1944]
Dvd ~ Deanna Durbin
Price: 12.99

4.0 out of 5 stars A well worth watching film noir, 9 July 2014
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This is an interesting film noir directed by Robert Siodmak released in black-and-white in 1944. The original story was by W. Somerset Maugham. Dean Harens plays army lieutenant Charlie Mason, who is about to go on Christmas leave to marry his fiancée in San Francisco. Before he can leave, he receives a cable telling him she has married someone else. He decides to fly to San Francisco anyway to see her but the flight is grounded in New Orleans because of a storm. Here, a local reporter covering the airplane story takes him to a local bordello where he is introduced to Jackie Lamont (Deanna Durbin). At the club, Jackie introduces us to the Frank Loesser number ‘Spring will be a little late this year’ and the couple dance to the Gene Depaul and Don Raye tune, ‘I’ll remember April’. Jackie also gets to sing Irving Berlin’s ‘Always’ and we get a couple of brief excerpts of Wagner’s ‘Tristan und Isolde’ – but this is no musical!

Charlie takes Jackie to a Christmas Mass at the local cathedral: she becomes upset and she pours out her heart to him. It seems her real name is Abigail Mannette, wife of convicted killer Robert Mannette (Gene Kelly). The couple live with his mother, who knows all about her son’s failings, for Robert is also a compulsive gambler and steals money from his mother.
This is a fine example of the genre and I would recommend viewing, quite apart from the pleasure of seeing Kelly and Durbin in dramatic roles.


A Mind to Kill - The Complete Series [DVD]
A Mind to Kill - The Complete Series [DVD]
Dvd ~ Philip Madoc
Price: 54.69

5.0 out of 5 stars The first Welsh detective drama series, before those from Scandinavia, 8 July 2014
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This is an excellent gritty detective drama series made in Wales. It captures the atmosphere of the less salubrious parts of the principality and accurately portrays attitudes of people in the more rural areas. The plots are believable and the acting is convincing, especially of the principals - Philip Madoc is DCI Noel Bain, Ffion Wilkins is his daughter Hannah, Sharon Morgan as pathologist Professor Margaret Edwards, Gillian Elisa and Geraint Lewis as Detective Sergeants Alison Griffiths and Carwyn Phillips. It must have been quite demanding to produce all of these programmes twice over - in English and in Welsh. It's good to have the whole three series boxed together now, and with the pilot episode, in much improved digital quality.


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