ARRAY(0xb74b08e4)
 
Profile for Marc John > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Marc John
Top Reviewer Ranking: 57,528
Helpful Votes: 554

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Marc John
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4
pixel
Audition (Collector's Edition) [DVD] [2001]
Audition (Collector's Edition) [DVD] [2001]
Dvd ~ Ryo Ishibashi
Offered by FilmloverUK
Price: 8.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Very tame - why the hype?, 4 Nov 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I won't give anything away but this is not an extreme film at all. For two hours you watch a (very) slow build up, explaining the characters and their background, followed finally by just six minutes of so-called "extreme" cinema, and then it ends. Even those six minutes of "gore" are tame, most of the action occurs off screen! I can't believe this film makes it onto most people's list of Top Ten most shocking and disturbing films. It's a piece of cake to watch. The hardest parts to get through are the two hours of mind numbing character development before the climatic "shock" scenes, which are not shocking at all. Very, very tame stuff and certainly not a "video nasty" of anything close to Hostel, for example. It looks gorgeous though, the sets, costumes, camera work and acting are very good. It's more like a classy Hollywood thriller than a full throttle attack on your nerves. I can't see how anyone would be disturbed or mentally affected by this tame, harmless film. I've seen stronger, nastier terror films at the 15-rated section of the genre. Get it if you like classy thrillers with minimal, teenager-level gore, but don't expect an adult experience or anything more than that.


A Dangerous Method [DVD]
A Dangerous Method [DVD]
Dvd ~ Keira Knightley
Price: 3.76

2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Long overdue movie about the great Carl Jung, 29 Jun 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: A Dangerous Method [DVD] (DVD)
It's not perfect, but it's very, very good. At last a movie that deals with the founders of psychology in a profound, artistic and memorable way. David Cronerberg's settings and direction are sumptuous, it feels more like a Merchant Ivory film than a flick from the man who made The Fly (the remake) and History of Violence. The film deals with the relationship between Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud lasting from their meeting to their eventual, acrimonious split. Bringing them together is Sabina, a Russian fetishist and Jung patient, with latent potential as an analyst. The screenplay deftly develops the characters and historical events, with exchanges and scenes amongst the characters that are rich, engrossing and highly thought provoking. What a treat for lovers of serious cinema and psychology alike.

Fassbender, as Jung, does a competent job, but you feel he lacks the bluster and panache of the real Jung. There are plenty of videos online of Jung being interviewed, so there's no excuse for Fassbender not adopting more of Carl Jung's mannerisms and swagger. Instead, he plays Jung like a passive, indecisive, weak-willed man, which any Jungian knows is not what Jung was. In the trio of main performances, Fassbender comes off worst. He doesn't even try a Swiss accent, which surely cannot be that difficult to master for a professional actor. I had the impression that Fassbender was more concerned about showing his potential to be the next James Bond instead of truly embracing Jung's persona. What a pity, I'm sure the talent is there.

Mortensen, as Freud, on the other hand, is sublime; with perfect nuances to his speech and behaviour. His Freud carries real authority, laced with just enough of the arrogance and pomp that the real man indeed possessed. Knightley is convincing, nothing more, but that's enough. You do get the sense that she's got one eye on the awards season with this over-wrought performance though.

But it must be said, it's great to see Freud and especially Jung get the big Hollywood movie treatment. If it leads more people to the theories of Jung, especially, it will only be a good thing.


The Middle Passage: From Misery to Meaning in Mid-Life (Studies in Jungian Psychology by Jungian Analysts)
The Middle Passage: From Misery to Meaning in Mid-Life (Studies in Jungian Psychology by Jungian Analysts)
by James Hollis
Edition: Paperback
Price: 9.29

1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Heavily negative but somewhat useful, 12 April 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I was attracted to this book not because I felt a mid-life crisis looming but because the author is a Jungian analyst who seemed to offer some useful insights into Jungian psychology. Anyone who attempts to read Jung's books knows how dense and inaccessible a lot of his writing can be, and for this reason we desperately need Jungian thinkers who can simplify the great man's ideas and insights. Hollis definitely does this at times, although his 'author's persona' is extremely negative. Many times a sentence will begin with the word 'sadly' followed by a general despairing attitude toward the nature of the psyche; it's as though Hollis is himself troubled and full of gloom, despite trying to communicate ideas that counteract such negativity. Also, far too often the author seems to be directing his writing at troubled people, as though he expects the majority of his readers to be severely depressed and in need of some sympathetic 'book therapy'. That may be you, but then again it might not be. Like me, you may have a positive, constructive attitude toward the challenges of the psyche - if you do you'll find Hollis to be totally the wrong 'book doctor' to visit, such is the heavy manner with which his writing makes the assumption that the reader is in a total state of despair. The word 'misery' in the title should already tell you the tone the author is striking.

Also, the book focuses far too much on the psychological processes involved in divorce and partner-reconcilation. Again it's like he's narrowed his audience down and made the assumption that not only are you miserable but surely a 'love-gone-wrong' scenario must be to blame too. If you're happily married or happily single you'll find yourself wading through several chapters that are irrelevant to your circumstances. Although those chapters are still interesting from an objective point of view.

It's interesting that Jungian theory explores how we 'project' our own inner complexes onto outer people and objects - and many times you find that even modern day Jungian analysts are doing exactly the same thing. Hollis seems to be an example of this. The book then becomes somewhat more fascinating not just for the occasional wisdom, but to see just how shadow-possessed the author is, whether he knows it or not! In one telling sentence, Hollis does actually confess that he himself was formerly a patient in psychotherapy - that made perfect sense judging by his negative posturing. I'm not sure he's worked out his own demons yet. Then again, how many Jungians have? Possibly Marie Louise von Franz was among the few who did, and for the best interpretation of Jungian ideas, she's as good as it gets.

But if you can get past this author's relentless assumptions that you must be miserable and alienated in the first place, there are some valid, useful insights in this book. All i wanted to see was a clearer rendering of Jung's complicated theories, I didn't need to be treated like a borderline psychotic who hates the world. Of course, if you are miserable, alienated and do hate the world, you'll gobble this book down quite quickly. After all, misery likes miserable company.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 6, 2012 10:12 PM BST


Disney The Muppets Fozzie Soft Toy 16"
Disney The Muppets Fozzie Soft Toy 16"
Offered by Emma's Party Stuff by EJG Supplies Ltd
Price: 23.99

1 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Loving it, 19 Mar 2012
= Durability:5.0 out of 5 stars  = Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars  = Educational:5.0 out of 5 stars 
The classic, fun-loving Muppet Fozzie Bear can now be enjoyed up close and personal by owning this gorgeous, well crafted, loveable soft toy, which faithfully captures Fozzie's adorable features and undeniable bear charm. Whether you're an adult or child, a serious soft toy collector or just someone looking for a cute gift, you cannot go wrong snapping up this fun, furry Muppet. Go on, give him a home and get the cuddles ready!


Now For Nookie - Roger de Coursey & Nookie The Bear [DVD]
Now For Nookie - Roger de Coursey & Nookie The Bear [DVD]
Price: 7.50

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic comedy from a top bear, 20 Jun 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
With a cheeky, cockney charm and a barely concealed hint of anarchy, Nookie Bear stormed onto UK television in the late 1970s/80s and was a big hit. I fondly remember enjoying plenty of Nookie as a child and this brilliant compilation of his first TV series is well worth watching for any lover of Nookie. Cuddly, cute and clever, Nookie was great entertainment and even went on to perform an adult show complete with outrageously bold profanity and risque behaviour, proving he could cater for "big kids" as well as the little ones. What a gifted bear! Nookie's timing, facial expressions and cheerful demeanour are a joy to behold, a very talented performer who is still on the scene today. With the rise of lifeless cookery and gardening shows in the 1990s onwards, classic 'double act comedy' like this was booted off-air and what a shame. Nookie owes a lot to partner Roger de Courcey who expertly provides physical and vocal assistance to enable Nookie to gleefully express himself. Everyone should have a bit of Nookie in their lives and this DVD will certainly put a smile on your face.


The Red Book: Liber Novus (Philemon)
The Red Book: Liber Novus (Philemon)
by CG Jung
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 96.10

4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Landmark stuff, 30 April 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Jung knew. Simple as that. The proper development of the personality means becoming whole by confronting the deep, mysterious, volatile, inner shadow and integrating it into consciousness. Nobody before or since Jung was so intrepid, pioneering or wise when it comes to this deeply complex process, which is part psychological and part mystical. Jung's Red Book is a treasure that lay buried for far too long. But it's editors and restoration experts have done a fine job presenting this seminal work, which is truly landmark stuff. The only criticism is the book's physical size, it is literally the size and thickness of a briefcase. We need Jung's work to be accessible and widely read, i.e. in coffee shops and on airplanes, etc. This is not a portable book at all and it won't be user-friendly as a result. A wise choice by the editors would be to publish a smaller version, even if it has to be abridged. The credit and service they do to Jung is almost cancelled out by the fact that anyone buying this book will be unable to physically handle it unless it's laid out flat on a large table similar to how you'd study a massive atlas. Saying that, it's still great to see such essential wisdom brought to the public domain.


Rites and Symbols of Initiation: The Mysteries of Birth and Rebirth
Rites and Symbols of Initiation: The Mysteries of Birth and Rebirth
by Mircea Eliade
Edition: Paperback
Price: 13.15

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential knowledge, 4 Jan 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Ritual "death and rebirth" ceremonies in primitive cultures produces a vital, psychological shift which not only prepares the youth for tribal duty but also initiates him into the deeper realms of his own psyche. Such rites were, and remain, spiritual in their processes and results. The initiated youths are brought into contact with their subconscious, wrathful "shadow side" no less, where they must overcome its terror and volatility and integrate its vital power. The Western world never had these ritual structures and we are spiritually poorer for it. In our society, the shadow side of the psyche is not confronted or integrated. Preserving the knowledge and practices of tribes and rites that knew how to face and overcome the psyche's shadow becomes all the more important, and Eliade does a very good job indeed. He does repeat himself and say the same thing twice in virtually every chapter, but that's a trivial complaint. This sort of scholarship is like an endangered species. This book is to be treasured.

Ex-Seeker


The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious (Collected Works of C. G. Jung)
The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious (Collected Works of C. G. Jung)
by C.G. Jung
Edition: Paperback
Price: 17.84

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A giant of the 20th century, 4 Jan 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
With his concept and direct experience of the sub-conscious Shadow, Jung put into words a masterpiece of understanding about what is happening within the psyche of each and every person. If you can take the time to properly digest this lengthy and sometimes dense text, you'll be wiser and more informed than ever before about how your psyche operates. Whether you can confront and integrate your own Shadow after that is another matter.

Ex-Seeker
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 6, 2013 2:03 PM BST


20cm Wood Wooden FREE STANDING CRUCIFIX CROSS Christ Jesus
20cm Wood Wooden FREE STANDING CRUCIFIX CROSS Christ Jesus
Offered by rosarybeads4u
Price: 24.95

2 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic mythic symbol, 4 Jan 2011
The image of Christ on the cross is intended to focus your mind inward, where you are invited to undergo your own personal, psychological "Christ experience" of dying to your conditioned consciousness to be reborn into spiritual consciousness. The suffering and sacrifice portrayed by this classical mythical figure mirrors what you must experience within yourself as you allow yourself to be psychologically crucified, annihilated and reborn. In other words, the crucifixion is a symbolic representation of a personal, inner, psychological act. It's wonderful to see such well fashioned art like this being offered. All we need now is for more people to understand its symbolic value. It is a mistake to regard this character as a real person; he is a mythic figure and you must learn to understand the crucifixion symbolically.

Ex-Seeker
Comment Comments (7) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 3, 2014 3:49 AM BST


Glimpses of the Devil: A True Story of Evil, Possession, Exorcism, and Redemption
Glimpses of the Devil: A True Story of Evil, Possession, Exorcism, and Redemption
by M.Scott Peck
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Professional abuse by a disturbed man, 25 May 2010
I was intrigued to read this book because it was written by a notable psychotherapist who had written bestselling psychology books in the past, the most famous being A Road Less Travelled. I was hoping for an insightful and well balanced psychological perspective on the subject of demonic possession but was shocked to discover that the doctor and author of this book, M Scott Peck, was actually a hardcore Christian who didn't have a rational, balanced attitude at all when it came to patients with obvious personality disorders.

Instead of taking a proper psychological approach to his subjects, Peck allowed his religious zeal to overwhelm and distort his methods, and leapt recklessly into unfounded diagnoses of demonic possession, even going so far as to attempt exorcising the so-called demons himself.

What's remarkable about the book is not the case studies that Peck presents, but the fact that the author had the nerve to write and publish the book in the first place. He reveals himself to be far from the wise old man you might imagine him to be from his reputation. Instead, you're left shocked and amazed that a man so out of touch with reality - and so terribly brainwashed by religion - could ever have thrived for so long as a bestselling author and medical professional. He clearly had mental issues of his own. Indeed, reading the book becomes more interesting in the sense that you get an insight into the mind of a man who went slightly mad over the years, thinking himself to be some kind of arch angel battling satanic forces in his patients.

There is nothing more disturbing than a therapist who abuses his or her position by trying to force religion or some other cult belief on mentally ill patients who need support and balanced care. Peck was a seriously disturbed man who should have been kicked out of the health profession and dropped by his publisher. In fact, he could have done with some therapy himself.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 4, 2011 2:02 PM GMT


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4