Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 70% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now Shop now
Profile for Amazon Customer > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Amazon Customer
Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,694,086
Helpful Votes: 62

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Amazon Customer

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3
pixel
Waterfall: A Novel (River of Time)
Waterfall: A Novel (River of Time)
Price: £3.79

4.0 out of 5 stars Surprise, 16 Jan. 2012
I downloaded this when it was free, after it came to my attention due to the coverage it was already getting on many of the blogs that I follow.
The plot, as you will have read in the synopsis or other reviews, is one that demands that the reader suspends belief for the time it takes to read it. This isn't a problem for me or for many readers out there whose sole desire when reading is escapism. However, for those who may find this a little more difficult, let me put you at ease - Lisa T Bergren MAKES it believable. I found myself feeling that I could step into this new world, so vivid is its depiction. The setting was lush and three dimensional and the historical details, as far as I am aware in my admittedly limited knowledge, where accurate.
Add to this political intrigue, danger, handsome men, and two sisters who are easy to relate to and willing to do anything for each other, and you have Waterfall - a story which you don't want to miss, and a world which you won't want to leave.


Darkfever (Fever 1)
Darkfever (Fever 1)
by Karen Marie Moning
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting start, 16 Jan. 2012
This review is from: Darkfever (Fever 1) (Paperback)
This is the first Karen Marie Moning book I have read and I have to say that it has convinced me to try more. The premise is intriguing; I have read books about the fae before but never one aimed at adults. The plot moved along swiftly and there was very little story-telling that was extraneous to the plot. There was even a good balance of action and romance, which I do enjoy in a book. In fact, the reading experience would have been almost perfect if not for one thing: the narrator. Mac is gutsy, I'll give her that, as she heads off to a strange country in search of answers regarding the death of her sister. Even her constant refusal to listen to what more experienced people instructher to do can be forgiven as a way to move the plot onwards. The constant fixation on her appearance, and reminders that she is pretty however (in first person, no less) are jarring considering the trials she faces in the book. I realise that in a series of books that revolve around the same person there has to be room for development, but that shouldn't be the driving factor when creating a character, in my opinion.
In short I have a very small grievance in a particularly promising start of a series (which is already finished, so brownie points for that), and I am looking forward to the rest of the novels in which the heroine will hopefully be slightly less fixated on her appearance whilst attempting to survive.


Sony PlayStation 3 Console (320GB Model) with Karate Kid (Blu-ray Movie) Bundle
Sony PlayStation 3 Console (320GB Model) with Karate Kid (Blu-ray Movie) Bundle

5.0 out of 5 stars Good Deal, 16 Jan. 2012
Even as someone who does not play video games all that often, I couldn't pass up on the great price amazon were offering for the bundle. Everyone I told thought it was odd that I had bought it, to the point that I was wondering if I had made a mistake. However, I can honestly say that there hasn't been a day gone by that I haven't used it since I bought it. No it hasn't turned me into a video game addict: the truth is that it is basically a home entertainment system. I can listen to music, watch Blu-ray, go online and communicate with friends on it. It has a huge amount of storage that's boosted even further by an external hard drive. And if I'm not too busy with all that of an evening - I can go on Lego Harry Potter. Well worth buying!


BAZINGA! The Big Bang Theory (Sheldon Cooper) T-Shirt - Navy - M
BAZINGA! The Big Bang Theory (Sheldon Cooper) T-Shirt - Navy - M
Offered by Pure Cotton
Price: £7.50

5.0 out of 5 stars Quality, 16 Jan. 2012
Due to the price of this product I was unsure what to expect, but after my fiancé has washed it a few times it still fits him perfectly and looks brand new. Great delivery speed, great item.


The Summer I Turned Pretty: 1
The Summer I Turned Pretty: 1
by Jenny Han
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hidden Depths, 17 Jun. 2011
The Summer I Turned Pretty is one of those books which are deceptively easy to underestimate. As I began reading, I was doing exactly that. All I wanted was a quick summer read that was interesting enough to keep me occupied for a couple of hours. I got so much more than that.
Belly as a character can be self-centred and selfish - but endearingly so; I think most people can remember a time when they believed that the world should revolve around them. This instantly reached me at a personal level, making me relate to Belly in a way that I hadn't expected. Adding in to this her uncertainty about who she wants to be with, and who might want to be with her, I think that there are very few people who don't understand what she is going through in this book. We, as readers, are witnessing a very important stage in her life, thereby already changing this book into more than a quick summer read. The other characters are all decidedly less developed than the protagonist, but that is not an issue, as what we are really reading about is not how Belly decides who she likes, but how she develops as a person.
More than this average development, however, we see how Belly reacts to several major issues which are thrown in her way, such as divorce, separated families, and illnesses. Through these issues we see how Belly changes and matures and I think it is testament to Jenny Han's writing skills that she introduces these darker elements without making light of them, or destroying the beach read aspect of it.
Definitely recommended, especially for people who like their summer reads not being all sunshine and roses.


Intertwined (An Intertwined Story, Book 1)
Intertwined (An Intertwined Story, Book 1)
Price: £2.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Slow Burner, 17 Jun. 2011
In Intertwined, Gena Showalter introduces a cast of original and likeable characters, and a very original premise. Honestly, throughout the first 100 or so pages, those aspects of the story only just made up for the seemingly unnecessarily adolescent writing style used. Having read many of Showalter's adult books, I am used to, and enjoy, her humorous, colloqial tone. However there was something jarring about it in Intertwined, as though it was trying too hard to sound adolescent; it almost became a parody of what it was trying to depict, and I admit that I nearly put the book down multiple times. But I didn't! And I'm glad, because that original, intriguing premise morphed into something much bigger and better; a mystery. With Gena Showalter's books, I have come to expect that I will be able to predict what happens - which is all very well in her adult PNR, where a sure thing is kind of the point. But after reading Intertwined, I find myself wishing that her books had a mystery element more often, because - believe me - she does it well! Towards the end, we learn a little more about the souls that inhabit Aden's body, a little more about his ties to the world around him - the mystery unravels slightly, so to speak. BUT! there are still so many questions left at the end of the book that I could have quite easily read another 440 pages that sitting, if it would have meant I got some answers.

There are some aspects of the story that aren't so well developed; the characters (even the ones in Aden's head) are all likeable and have their own personality, but everyone seems very one-dimensional, making it difficult to get past the liking and actually relate to them. It would be nice to see more character-building in Unravelled. However, if there is one thing, as this book proves, that Gena Showalter does really, really well - it is spinning a good story. I would suggest that anyone reading it does not give up hope when all seems lost. In a world with so many great books coming out everyday, I know that it seems a crime to waste time on what seems like a lost cause, but I personally believe that, in this case, it was worth it.


Rosebush
Rosebush
by Michele Jaffe
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Gripping, 17 Jun. 2011
This review is from: Rosebush (Paperback)
This story reminds me of exactly the reason I never wanted to be popular; because when you're all the way at the top, the only way to go is down. And Jane, the protagonist, goes down in spectacular fashion, and with a literal bang. Waking up in hospital with amnesia places Jane in exactly the same boat as the reader; clueless. The mixture of present time and memories is very effective, allowing the reader only to know what Jane herself knows, thereby keeping the mystery. And - for me, at least - it was a mystery, right until the very end: keeping me reading after I'd told myself I would only read a couple of chapters, when I really should have been revising. What also kept me reading was the impeccable writing; I had read another of Michelle Jaffe's books, in which she was laugh out loud funny and reminiscent of Meg Cabot, but for me, Rosebush shows just how well the author can adapt to different styles successfully. There are only two grievances I have with this book, one is Jane's character; her overwhelming naivete - it's been the fodder for feel-good teen movies for decades, but I still find it quite unbelievable that a girl who has previously been under the radar thinks she can become popular and not have to pay some price. Also annoying is her seemingly irrational dislike of her step-father-to-be for much of the book. The other is that the end seems a little rushed, as though there had been that much time spent on the mystery that very little had been put into the solving of it, but the fact that Jane is in more danger when the mystery is solved keeps it from feeling too anti-climatic.
Cliched or not, this book directly supports the phrase 'With friends like these, who needs enemies'- but the twist is that it's not made entirely clear to whom this applies - but it could be used to describe every single person in the book.


The Poison Diaries
The Poison Diaries
by Maryrose Wood
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Gothic Fairytale, 21 April 2011
This review is from: The Poison Diaries (Paperback)
I've had this book for months and had been putting it off for way too long, and I don't really know why. The entire reason I picked it up is because the idea of poison intrigued me: that something so lethal can come from things which are generally beautiful is a profound belief, and representative of the plot in its entirety. The synopsis doesn't seem to say much, but it adequately and succinctly sums up what is at the heart of the story: love, even though it is ostensibly a good thing, can be poisonous.
Jessamine lives with her father and, although she is used to being lonely by necessity, she befriends the orphan Weed when he is brought into their home. The friendship doesn't come easily, but when it does, it quickly develops into something more. However, he's keeping secrets from her - and he's not the only one.
Jessamine is a likeable character, but not much else. The book is only 237 pages long so there's not a whole lot of time for development, but for much of it she seems slightly one-dimensional: this may be because she is living with a father who cares more about his plants and information than about her. As her relationship with Weed developed, I was able to identify with her more because she cared about him of her own volition, rather than possibly just because that is the only life she's ever known. Although defiance towards parents is not always a good thing, it was nice to see her defending the boy she was coming to have feelings for in the face of the father she seems wary of ( for good reason).
Weed is an enigma at first. From many of his actions when he is first integrated into the household, it is easy to believe that he is mad. The explanation, when it's finally given, does not shed a whole lot of light on the situation. His actions are now somewhat understandable, but we are left with more questions: why has he got this ability being the biggest one. Regardless, or perhaps in part due to, the mystery surrounding him, he is an endearing character: he is socially inept and probably wary in the situations he is put into, but his belief that Jessamine will steer him in the right direction is endearing, I would have liked to have known more about his origins, but as I read somewhere that there are going to be more books, this will probably be explored in the future.
The writing throughout is very simplistic, making this short read even quicker, but there are some lovely poetic turns of phrase and the story doesn't suffer at all. If I had to pick one thing which I disliked about the story it would be the abruptness of the ending: even if there are to be other books, this one finished really awkwardly and had me checking frantically for more pages. I realise that cliff-hangers are a ploy often used by series authors, and I don't mind that - I do, however, mind the fact that the book seems to finish mid-paragraph.
All in all, I give this book four out of five stars. It's a much better read than I had apparently anticipated, and the supernatural element was completely original as far as I know. I actually didn't see the twist coming until it was right on top of me, and then it left me a little gobsmacked, which - if not a sign of a good book - is at least a sign that the book has got you thinking. I would recommend to anyone who wants a new spin on the supernatural. There isn't a lot of text about the poisons and their properties, but what there was I enjoyed, and I assume they will take a more prominent role in later books.


Delirium (Delirium Trilogy 1)
Delirium (Delirium Trilogy 1)
by Lauren Oliver
Edition: Hardcover

4.0 out of 5 stars Exciting story - Eventually, 21 April 2011
The plot of Delirium sounded little short of perfect: probably the reason it has generated so much interest in potential readers. What better problem (a slightly oxy-moronic sentence but I think you catch my drift) for Lena Haloway to face than love being a disease and, therefore, forbidden? How does anyone fight that? And, perhaps more importantly - would they want to? I think this is something that everyone can relate to; we all have some sort of experience to the effect that love can be painful. I certainly have, so this is a book which made me think, even before I had begun to read it.

It was, however, a worryingly slow starter for me; after months of avidly wanting to read it and then requesting it on NetGalley, I was so apathetic about the story - characters and all - for the first third, at least, that I was worried there was no way I was going to be able to finish it. And had I not actively requested it, I might have added it gladly to the DNF pile and moved on. As it was, I felt I had an obligation to give it a fair trial. And, although I didn't expect to be, I am infinitely glad that I did.

My main issue was with the characters. I felt a sense of detachment which may very well have been deliberately done, considering the subject matter, but which allowed me to feel absolutely no connection to these people who were completely different from me. This detachment was perhaps even more pronounced with Lena, who I should have felt most strongly about. This is a risk that all dystopian books take, I suppose, and happily it was one that paid off in Delirium when Lena began to actually take an active interest in her future, rather than just seeming to go with the flow. I sympathised with her but there was never enough emotion for me to empathise instead. Alex presented a much more interesting character for me; he was a walking mystery for most of the book, and even whilst revealing himself, it seems as though he was always keeping something back. I didn't know whether he was someone to be trusted or not, which makes the ending of the book even more surprising than it might have been.

And what an ending! I can't really say more about it without giving it away, but it was not what I was expecting at all. It was, albeit in a very odd way, infinitely better than I was expecting. It left me anxious for the sequel, but it didn't seem to be written merely to keep people reading; I remember thinking, as my mouth hung open, that there was really no other way that Delirium could have ended. The ending sums up, succinctly, the whole point of Delirium, while conversely leaving so much more to be said; yes, love can be painful - but only the individual can say if it is worth that pain.

All in all, this book was a four out of five stars for me. The levels of thought it provoked, as well as the last two thirds of the plot, made up for the lack of emotional response to the characters. There were some points that jarred, especially in the description of the world it depicts but Lauren Oliver has, in her first foray into dystopian fiction, created a believable environment for her story to take place in.


Nightshade: Number 1 in series (Nightshade Trilogy)
Nightshade: Number 1 in series (Nightshade Trilogy)
by Andrea Cremer
Edition: Paperback

3.0 out of 5 stars Lukewarm, 20 April 2011
After all the hype surrounding this book, I was expecting to either love it or hate it - as usually happens with books that have so much attention. Honestly, however, after turning the last page the overriding feeling I had was one of ambivalence. The writing itself is technically very good, I can't deny that, but the complete lack of interest in any of the character's fates marred even my enjoyment of that. Ren is a future alpha who is controlled by his father, Calla is his female counterpart who will always be second fiddle, and the way in which they allow themselves to be manipulated constantly is an exercise in abject frustration. Shay is a more enjoyable character, but his almost instantaneous attraction to Calla makes me question his credibility.
The story is interesting; giving a different explanation for werewolves and focussing on the magical aspect, but without the benefit of identifiable characters to tie it together, it all falls a bit flat.
Altogether I think this book deserves three stars. There are parts of it which really caught and held my attention, including many of the secondary characters, but the main protagonists left me cold.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3