Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 50% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now Shop now
Profile for I. S. Pegler > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by I. S. Pegler
Top Reviewer Ranking: 124,920
Helpful Votes: 113

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
I. S. Pegler "ianto29" (Wales)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4
pixel
Flight From Glastonbury
Flight From Glastonbury
by D H Davies
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A novel about the magical Nanteos Cup, 5 Mar. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a novelisation of the well known story of the Nanteos Cup, a small wooden bowl that was formerly kept at Nanteos mansion, near Aberystwyth in mid Wales. It has entered the realm of folklore and belief, but many of the stories concerning it are probably not that old. Nevertheless it does have a certain magic and charm about it, and there are still people - even today - who claim that the vessel has magical healing properties.

One of the stories is that the Cup is the Holy Grail, the vessel used by Joseph of Arimathea to catch Christ's blood as he was crucified. Joseph carried the Cup to Britain, so the story goes, and to Glastonbury, where Joseph built a church, and the famous abbey was later built on the same spot. The Cup was kept, again according to the legend, at Glastonbury until the time of the dissolution of the monasteries and this is the point where the novel by D. H. Davies breaks into the story.

The monks face a hazardous journey in their efforts to escape with a cargo of the abbey's treasures sewn into their monkish clothes. The are pursued and end up losing most of the treasure but manage to bring the bowl to mid Wales where they find sanctuary in a mansion.

I'm about half way through and enjoying it very much, this is obviously a labour of love and the reasons for it are revealed at the end.

I happen to be writing what I hope will be the definitive history of the Nanteos Cup, which is why it attracted my attention. So very good luck with it, it deserves more publicity, especially in Wales!

I have recently leart that the Nanteos Cup is being exhibited at the National Library of Wales. Perhaps they will sell the book in the shop?


13 CM PROFESSOR CALCULUS IN THE GARDEN FIGURINE FROM THE ADVENTURES OF TINTIN
13 CM PROFESSOR CALCULUS IN THE GARDEN FIGURINE FROM THE ADVENTURES OF TINTIN

5.0 out of 5 stars A lovable character, and expert dowser, 9 Dec. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The figure is in PVC, just under 13cm high (including the base) and exceptionally well made. It comes in a clear tube, I suppose you could just keep it in that, but I think it's better to remove the figure (carefully!) from the tube. This figure has no moving parts, it is not a toy - it is for putting on a shelf as decoration, away from small children, cats and dogs with waggy tails.

Professor Calculus is a lovable character, an eccentric, somewhat deaf but brilliant scientist and an expert dowser. Here he is depicted in a scene from Red Rackham's Treasure where he meets up with with the other characters and Captain Haddock tries to dispose of his dowsing pendulum but Snowy keeps on retrieving it and returning it to the profesor. Although we see him with the spade in this scene, we never see him dig.

This is a must for Tintin die-hards, I can't really fault it.


Black Metal Folding Magnifier Magnifying Glass Jewelry Loupes 10X
Black Metal Folding Magnifier Magnifying Glass Jewelry Loupes 10X
Offered by sourcingmap
Price: £7.75

2.0 out of 5 stars At the top of the page it says 30x but ..., 14 Nov. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
At the top of the page it says 30x but in the product specification it says 10x. When I tested it, the subject was approximately doubled in size (which should really be 2x shouldn't it?) Anyway, dissapointed with regards to magnification, but a robust tool.


THE STORY OF GLASTONBURY
THE STORY OF GLASTONBURY
by sabel Hill Elder
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not real history - sorry, 14 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a rather slim little booklet by Isabel Hill Elder who was a leading light in the British Israelite movement. The British Israelites believe that the native British were descended from the "lost" ten tribes of Judah, but this idea is not accepted by mainstream historians.

The book is a pseudo-historical work with no bibliography or references. Gerald Hawkins (author of "Stonehenge Decoded") gets a brief mention. Her version of Druidism is portrayed as compatible with Christianity and that Glastonbury was an important Druidic centre which became known as Avalon. We are told that Joseph of Arimathea brought the boy Jesus to Britain and that Jesus was educated at the Druidic school at Glastonbury. Some time later he returned home to complete his ministry.

Also mentioned is King Arviragus who supposedly granted the twelve hides of Glastonbuy to Joseph, the story of the miraculous Holy Thorn etc. We are told that the Holy Grail was kept at Glastonbury until the time of the dissolution of the monasteries. It was then taken by the Prior and six monks "over the impassable mountains" to Strata Florida abbey in Mid Wales. When King Henry the VIII's men came to destroy Strata Florida, the Prior and the monks fled to Nanteos Manor, near Aberystwyth. When the last monk was dying, he charged the Powells to keep the Grail (also known as the "Nanteos Cup") "until the church claims her own".

So goes the story, except that the "Nanteos Cup" is most likely a mediaeval mazer bowl.

Elder points at ancient manuscripts held at the British Museum and Jesus College as proof of the Arimathian traditions (which they most certainly are not) and reserves especial contempt for "the sceptic and the scoffer".

As a history of ancient Glastonbury it is basically worthless, but of interest to historians who wish to study the evolution of ideas and beliefs growing around Glastonbury in more modern times.


The Lost Magic of Christianity: Celtic Essene Connections
The Lost Magic of Christianity: Celtic Essene Connections
by Michael Poynder
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars New Age history of Celtic Christianity, 22 April 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This work by the late Michael Poynder definitely falls into the category of New Age history. The "historical" accounts here are certainly at odds with the "mainstream" view of things. It covers other areas such as sacred geometry, gemstones, chakras, dowsing, the Holy Grail, druidism etc.

Poynder developed a view of a "Celtic Christianity" that was compatible with druidism in which all this mystic knowledge was passed on. He believed (with Holger Kersten, author of "Jesus lived in India") that Christ survived the crucifixion and disappeared into India whilst some of his disciples came to Britain, lead by Joseph of Arimathea who of course brought the Holy Grail with him. We are later told that the Holy Grail survived as the Nanteos Cup. If you like this kind of "alternative" stuff it is rather wonderful but the "history" is questionable and the bibliography and references are somewhat lacking, to put it mildly.


The Keys to Avalon: The True Location of Arthur's Kingdom Revealed
The Keys to Avalon: The True Location of Arthur's Kingdom Revealed
by Steve Blake
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best of its kind, 27 Dec. 2012
I've read many books on the "truth" of the Arthurian legends over the course of the years. They all seem scholarly when you read them and yet they all contradict each other. Then eventually you begin to notice a pattern, namely that the author(s) always seem to live in the same general area that they say King Arthur fought his battles, or where Merlin lived etc. etc. In other words it's all a bit partisan. Nevertheless, this book and the follow-up Pendragon: The Definitive Account of the Origins of Arthur are still among my favourites. Although I wasn't totally impressed by the "reworked" geography of Ynys Prydain there are some interesting arguments tackled here that the critics have ignored. It is certainly true that one or two Glastonbury foundation myths do not belong to Glastonbury at all and may in fact relate to places in North Wales. This book was the starting point for my own investigations which resulted in my own Valle Crucis and the Grail and even though I didn't agree on every point, I still believe that Keys to Avalon is one of the best of the populist tomes on the subject of the historicity that underpins the Arthurian story.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 31, 2015 6:37 AM GMT


There Ain't No Sanity Clause
There Ain't No Sanity Clause

5.0 out of 5 stars The best Xmas single ever, 19 Dec. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A classic track from Britain's original punks with a festive seasonal theme. The Damned are still going strong: same power, same break-neck pace, even after all these years. Catch them live!


The Funky Gibbon (feat. Gibbons)
The Funky Gibbon (feat. Gibbons)
Price: £0.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Funky nostalgia, but it's a remix, 18 Aug. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Originally a novelty single released in the mid 1970's by the British comedy troupe known as The Goodies, a.k.a Bill Oddie, Tim Brooke-Taylor and Graeme Garden who entertained us on our TV screens for a full decade. Just a brief caveat that this track is a remix, not the original version - but all in a good cause, namely saving the gibbon, so go ahead and download it now! Over 60% of the proceeds go to the Save the Gibbon campaign set up by the International Primate Protection League, a charity dedicated to the conservation of primates.


Staedtler Mars Professional 555 Compass Set with Lead Part, Extension Bar, Technical Pen Adapter, Universal Adapter and Spares Box
Staedtler Mars Professional 555 Compass Set with Lead Part, Extension Bar, Technical Pen Adapter, Universal Adapter and Spares Box
Price: £41.10

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Professional compass, professional price-tag, 12 Nov. 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I looked at other compasses but I wanted something that was robust and solid. There is too much plastic in many of the others for my liking, this one is solid metal and very well constructed - precision engineering. The buttons on each arm provide a quick release mechanism that allows you to extend the arms out very quickly to the approximate length, then you can fine tune it with the wheel to get it absolutely right.

The needle has two ends - both VERY sharp - and you can use either end. The hinged leg joints are a bit stiff, which is quite satistying. You can use the pencil-leads or use the universal adaptor for use with an ordinary pencil or pen. The extension arm has a second adaptor which is slightly plasticy and too broad to hold a pencil or even a pen. I presume it's for use with one of their own technical drawing pens.

A WORD OF WARNING. According to Staedler's website there's a "telescopic extender bar" in the needle-leg, but mine doesn't seem to have this feature. I presume it refers to a different model?

Still worth five stars in terms of quality, but a bit pricey.


Fiery Shapes: Celestial Portents and Astrology in Ireland and Wales, 700-1700
Fiery Shapes: Celestial Portents and Astrology in Ireland and Wales, 700-1700
by Mark Williams
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £74.00

5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, horrible price-tag, 2 July 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is an academic book (it's printed by Oxford University Press) so there's no way it should be classed as "Mind Boy & Spirit" and especially not "Druidism" - that's completely misleading of Amazon. The main body of the work is just 190 pages, so it's a fairly slim, specialised history book aimed at serious historians of Astrology, so if you already have Nicholas Campion's two-volume History of Western Astrology (see here and here) then you may well be interested in this one.

As academic books go, this one has a reasonably good style. I would have liked to have known more about the content of the manuscript NLW 3026C (which is viewable online at the National Library of Wales' "Digital Mirror" web-pages) but the emphasis seems to be on the influence of the texts (for example on the Welsh bards like Gutun Owain, the noble families etc.) rather than their content, although there is some description of the use of the volvella, the table of hours etc. but not enough for me. For example we are told "(f[olio] 27 [of NLW 3026C] even provides a complex table for integrating the solar and lunar calendars, giving a key to the nineteen-year metonic cycle by which the combination of a specific moon phase and calendar recurs" - which would be completely fascinating but it goes no further and does not demonstrate its use.

Nevertheless a work of some considerable scholarship and worth five stars, but the price-tag is way over the top for such a slim volume.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4