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S. Nash (UK)
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Phil Spector Presents The Philles Album Collection
Phil Spector Presents The Philles Album Collection
Offered by skyvo-direct
Price: 28.14

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Back to mono (again, again and again), 2 Nov 2011
I'll keep this short and sweet, what we have here a body of truly excellent work from a man whose production talents are up with the best of them.

We have a beatifully packaged box featuring lovely replica card sleeves and an informative book. It is possibly the first time some of these Spector albums have ever been released on CD.

However, look very closely at the track listings, many of the tracks are duplicate, sometimes triplicated especially those Crystals tracks.

It is a good job the price tag has been kept to 23 as you may get over 80 tracks but the reality somewhere nearer to 50. It's a box the for die hard fans only, there are easier and less complicated ways for the novice to get into the world of the Wall of sound and where on earth is the seminal Christmas album?
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 18, 2011 12:02 PM GMT


Walking The Ghost Back Home (25th Anniversary Edition)
Walking The Ghost Back Home (25th Anniversary Edition)
Price: 13.34

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 25 years in the waiting......, 21 Oct 2011
The Bible! was a reasonably controvertial name for a band back in 1986 but it did not particulalry matter as Walking the ghost back home was largely ignored until the band finally scored a reasonable hit two years later with their major label single Honey be good. It was however an album of melodic beauty. Song after song of smooth acoustic based (almost indie, almost folk) songs filled the album, there were no fillers and the original backs label CD pressing even included most of the original B-sides to the Gracelend and Mahalia singles however, the album tracks were jumbled around and the track The red flag was even omitted and in usual 1986 fashion the CD sounded very tinny and quiet. Fast forward 25 years to the 25th anniversary edition, the album tracks are back in their rightful order (still no Red flag though) and all of the original B-sides are now present at the end including the wonderful Glorybound and even an excellent demo version of She's my bible. The sound quality is stunning, I'm hearing things in the tracks I've never heard before. The original album only featured 8 tracks, this CD version only features 12 and if I'm honest I'm left wanting more and on hearing of it's release I actually expected more. The only other small gripe is that there is no booklet, the sleevenotes have to be downloaded from a website noted on the sleeve (I hope other labels doing re-issues do not take up this idea, the whole point of a re-issue is the nice booklet that accompanies the re-mastered CD).
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 24, 2012 9:06 PM BST


The Wrong People
The Wrong People
Price: 10.03

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A lost masterpiece......, 7 May 2010
This review is from: The Wrong People (Audio CD)
It's hard to believe that some 24 years ago Furniture released their third album "The wrong people". The band had been doing the rounds in the late 1970's, their first mini album "When the boom was on" released in 1983 was a low key, semi jazzy affair, even so the grit, humour and that dark streak of trademark Furniture was present (the album even featured the original version of "I miss you"). The band's second album "The lovemongers" was more accomplished, still sparse, but just as gritty, the band had developed their sound and in places and it was clear to hear just how good this band were, the original version of "Love your shoes" was enough to hook anyone in, anyone that heard it that was and sadly at the time very few had.

By 1986, little else had been heard of the band until the excellent news that the band had signed to the successful Stiff label and that an album was imminent, at last, a large label had heard the potential in this band that only the select few had been enjoying for the previous three years. The first single from the album "Brilliant mind" was well, brilliant, amazing lyrics, punchy bass, it set a mood, told a story, finally the public took notice, it made number 21 in the UK charts, suddenly the future looked extremely bright. The wrong people" was released later that year, it was a masterpiece, the production, the strings, the keys, everything had been turned up five notches from the sparse production of the first two albums. The songs were flawless, the opening "Shake like Judy says", washed over the listner creating a desperate ache, it fell stright into the re-worked "Love your shoes", it was full throttle Furniture (how this single failed to chart is beyond belief). "She gets out the scrapbook" is the band's jewel in the crown, six minutes of heartache, told in a story, it builds to a huge crescendo of sound, if this track didn't move the listner to tears the follow up "I miss you" most certainly did (this is one of the saddest songs ever written, if you've ever been lost in the desolate hurt of a breakup, it may not be the time to play this track). The mood is lifted on (the original) side two but the quality is equally stunning. The jazzy "Let me feel your pulse" and the full on "Answer the door" lead into the epic closer "Pierre's fight" (a desperate piano ballad fuelled with angst and desolation). This album should have been housed in many more record collections than it it was, unfortunatley it wasn't really Furniture's fault that the album went largely un-noticed, the record label had encountered major financial difficulties by the end of 1986 and only several thousand copies of the album were ever pressed up and like far too many mid Eighties bands, Furniture were quickly passed by.

Some 24 years later (the excellent Cherry Red label) has finally released this masterpiece on CD, the crystal clarity of the vocals, instruments and production are a joy to hear (my chewed up cassette copy, carefully selotaped at one end has long since lost any of it's audio quality). There are bonus tracks too, not that this album requires any padding out in any way but we are treated to the two 12" mixes of the two stiff singles, their respective B-sides (all of which have never been released on any other format other than vinyl) but best of all we are treated to two demo tracks - "That man you loved" (it's just yet more quality Furniture, a little rawer but a quality track) and "Never said" (it's amazing, think Dexy's doing one of their slower soul ballads, Jim Irvin alway had a tinge of Kevin Rowland in his voice for me and that's no bad thing. This track is way too good for a demo, way too good). All topped off with a detailed booklet full of photos and lyrics to every track, even the demos and an absolute steal at mid-price.

Let's hope Cherry Red will re-issue the first two albums on CD and the band's final 1989 album "Food, sex and paranoia", yet another long lost classic.


Belle & Sebastian's If You're Feeling Sinister (331/3)
Belle & Sebastian's If You're Feeling Sinister (331/3)
by Scott Plagenhoef
Edition: Paperback
Price: 8.99

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I'm feeling a bit sinister......, 26 Jan 2008
This is the first book in the 33 1/3 series I have ever read, the series looked interesting and I planed to buy more books in the series. I initially opted to buy the book about If you're feeling sinister, the second album by one of my favourite bands ever, Belle and Sebastian. I was expecting the book to focus on the recording of the album or at least what listeners thought about the album, after all there was 105 pages in the book in which to do so. The book was well written, the author Scott Plagenhoef knew his subject well discussing key points in the band's history and making a lot of comparisions to their contemporaries and to similar music that had possibly influenced the band including how the band came together, a detailed section on the legendary debut album Tigermilk, great quotes from vintage interviews, the Pete Waterman/Brits winning fiasco, the departure of band members Stuart David and Isobel Campbell and even unearthing the names of some unreleased gems scheduled for both Tigermilk and Sinister (worth the cover price alone for this information for the hardcore fan), but the one thing the book lacked was information about the title i.e. If you're feeling sinister, it took approximately 90 pages before the album was mentioned in any depth and was glossed over in less than 5 pages. At the end Plagenhoef aptly noted that Belle and Sebastian maybe one of the last great bands to have been slowly discovered in the old fashioned way with the internet age making the whole process much easier. It was a good read but probably for hardcore fans only.


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