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Tassel Fringe Cream Hanging String Partition Divider 90x200cm Wall Door Curtain
Tassel Fringe Cream Hanging String Partition Divider 90x200cm Wall Door Curtain
Offered by UK MegaDeals
Price: £6.34

2.0 out of 5 stars Doesn't keep out flies, 28 May 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
It looks pretty, but it doesn't keep out flies. Pity.


Not If I See You First
Not If I See You First
Price: £3.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Engaging teen read, 17 Jan. 2016
ARC from NetGalley in return for an honest review.

I downloaded and read this book in an afternoon :) It's not overly long and, apart from some introspective passages, the storyline doesn't dilly dally. The story revolves around Parker, who became blind at the age of 7 in pretty grim circumstances, even for becoming blind. By the time we pick up her life she's lost a lot and has her aunt's family living with her. Most of the action is set at Parker's high school. I found it interesting to only know certain things about the friends from Parker, who obviously doesn't have the perspective of what they look like..

Parker is quite abrasive at times, she says she lost some of her...tact I guess, when she lost her sight. She's a thinker too, analysing her actions and those of others throughout the story. Parker has rules, rules all her friends need to respect if they want to stay friends with her, because rule infinity is basically a 'betray me and we're done forever' rule. The main story of the book centres around Parker and her ex best friend, who broke one of the rules and is now the subject of a rule infinity order - no second chances. I can't really comment much more on the evolution of the storyline without giving spoilers, but it was a well told journey for Parker, not just in her dealings with the ex-BF but her friends and family.

A bit sweary, which was a pity, but otherwise an engaging teen story.


Fire Colour One
Fire Colour One
Price: £0.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Loved this., 23 July 2015
This review is from: Fire Colour One (Kindle Edition)
ARC from NetGalley in return for an honest review.

The story starts at the end, leaving you wondering for the whole book what, exactly, Iris has burnt. She loves fire. Iris is the daughter of an absent father and a really unpleasant mother (with a partner in tow). Her best friend, Thurston, sounds like a really cool performance artist. Iris's mother drags her back to the UK at her dying father's request, and we see her story unfold in flashbacks, narratives and memories. The ending is superb and really satisfying. It is unconventional, but mesmerising too, with lots to say and think about. The author caught me right at the beginning and kept me guessing right till the end.

There are a few swear words in, just FYI.


Fangirl
Fangirl
Price: £4.74

2.0 out of 5 stars Mostly good but jarring at one point, 12 Mar. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Fangirl (Kindle Edition)
I've not read any Rainbow Rowell books before, I only downloaded this one because it was 99p on kindle daily deal and looked like a possibility to check out (I like YA novels in general).

Cath write slash fan fic about a (teen) magician and his (teen) vampire enemy, her home life is a bit messed up, she has a twin, they go to college, they make their way through freshman year (Cath, rather than the twin, is the main focus), friends, boys, interspersed with fic and fanfic chapters and parent stuff. It's an interesting story, Cath is quirky but sympathetic and you end up rooting for her.

However I do think that authors, particularly those writing to a child, teen or YA audience have a responsibility to think about the words they use and how their endorsement of such words makes them seem acceptable. I'm not talking about the F word, it's used a few times in Fangirl. Sadly Rowell uses the word "spaz", "Don't be a spaz". Spaz=spastic, an outdated term for someone with cerebral palsy. it's not as if there aren't lots of other words that don't reference the disabled as synonymous with acting stupidly or awkwardly. I don't see why this type of word is any more acceptable than pejorative racial or sexual/gender words, and it jarred a lot to read it in Fangirl. Hence 2 stars.


Fat Chance
Fat Chance
Price: £3.49

29 of 37 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars When will authors realise that using "retarded" is not acceptable?, 5 Mar. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Fat Chance (Kindle Edition)
So, Fat Chance...

It's not just the use of the word "retarded" (of which more later) I didn't like, to be fair. The second page made crude reference to the main couple having sex in a cupboard at school, and it's liberally sprinkled with the f-word, some people won't mind that, and I try not to judge a story too much in the language used if I think it's promising enough. The concept of an overweight couple going on a weightloss competition on a radio show, the promised humour (there were some funny bits) and wanting to know what happens were enough to keep me going for a time.

I've stopped now though. Zoe and Greg have to take part in a spinning challenge as part of the competition, and when they get to the gym there are massive and unflattering posters of all the contestants. Zoe describes herself as looking like a horse, then says Greg "doesn't come off much better" because his smile makes him look "slightly retarded". The obvious comparison here is retarded=unattractive. It's clearly escaped the author's notice that "retarded" is no longer considered acceptable due to its highly pejorative connotations - it's a word that is never used positively when describing a person, with or without an intellectual disability, and its negative stereotyping and association damages the way people see people with an intellectual disability. Check out [...] for more on this.


All That Glitters (Geek Girl, Book 4) (Geek Girl Series)
All That Glitters (Geek Girl, Book 4) (Geek Girl Series)
Price: £4.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Several new adventures for geeky heroine Harriet, 26 Feb. 2015
*advance copy received in return for an honest review*

I'll start by saying I am unlikely to be in Holly Smale's target audience for her Geek Girl books. I happened across one in a quest to find some books my daughter might like, downloaded it and read it myself. She's reading book 3 at the moment, and blogging about them for her school. When I got an email saying book 4 was available for one week only it was already 5 days into the week, so I figured I was fairly unlikely to be approved, but I was! I read the whole book in one afternoon/evening, neglecting the washing up, kitchen floor and all sorts - that in itself is enough reason to be grateful to Holly Smale!

What I love about the Geek Girl books is that they're fun, fast moving and Harriet is brilliantly geeky. As for Wilbur, let's just say I've been known to call the daughter 'Baby, Baby Panda' on occasion.

This one? It really got me, and I wasn't expecting it would. Harriet-world is immersive, rather like her trips out of reality into the Discworld, you can get caught up in her ups and downs. Even though my own sixth form experience was quite different to Harriet's I laughed and cringed and dreaded/anticipated what was going to happen next, mapping it into my own experiences of school. I think Holly Smale got this one spot on, she made Harriet really relatable, which is no mean feat since I've never modelled, acted or any such thing. So, for a book aimed at teenage girls I really loved it, and I will be buying a paper copy for my daughter very soon.


LifeProof Fre for iPad Mini - Black
LifeProof Fre for iPad Mini - Black

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Let the testing begin!, 18 Jan. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I have just purchased the Lifeproof Fre case for my son's iPad mini - and so begins possibly the most exacting test for any case. He has owned and broken 5 iPads so far (dropped (twice), dunked in the bath, trodden on and ruined by constant application of saliva. We've tried a few cases, and both the Griffin and Otterbox have been great as far as they go...but neither one claim to be waterproof, and we've come to the point where that's what the newest replacement needs most. I've taken the Griffin for myself and moved to the Lifeproof Fre which claims to be waterproof. So, let the testing begin. I will report back on whether the case survives this sternest of tests and, if it doesn't, what the company do about it.


Who Wants to Marry a Millionaire? - A Fairytale(ish) Romance
Who Wants to Marry a Millionaire? - A Fairytale(ish) Romance
Price: £2.99

25 of 31 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A mixed bag, 27 Dec. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Honestly not sure where to put this in terms of stars. I should preface this review by saying that I have talked to the author (via email) about the issues I have with this book, we've both put our points across. I promised her, during this exchange of views, that I would give the book a fair review, this is my effort at doing so.

Good points:
This is unashamedly in the chick lit genre, and does what it says on the tin, to use a hackneyed and inaccurate phrase. It's easy, light reading, the characters are generally nicer (apart from the deliberately not so nice ones of course!) than in the author's first book. Another reviewer said they were the kind of people you'd like to go out for a drink with, and while I'd probably feel horribly out of place drinking with them, they'd have a great time with more sociable people than me!

It's a satisfying storyline in that the right people end up happy. I don't like books where it all goes wrong at the end, well, I don't like the ending bit anyway. The Frog Prince didn't leave me feeling as though there were ends to be tied.

I liked the reinvention of the heroine from drudgery to something she loved and was inspired by. That's pretty feel-good.

Bad points:
My main one is two uses of words referencing the disabled. One's new (romantard) and one's old (spacker) - as I said, I've debated this with Ms Ranald and the latter word, for fairness, is used in the context of historical bullying. For a far better explanation of why not to use derivations of retard (e.g. Romantard) than I can coherently give I would direct anyone interested to www.r-word.org I would normally immediately delete a book using this sort of language, and the fact that I carried on is because I've followed this author via the web, blogs, articles and books and like her and her work (Internet only, I don't actually 'know' know her). While I'm not comfortable with either word, some others may find them contextually justifiable, I don't know, but the R-word website is worth a read whether you do or you don't. There is a SEN teacher character who makes a brief appearance, she seems nice, and inspired by SEN kids (who are, in fact, awesome), though a bit desperate for commitment!

There's also a fair amount of swearing (maybe less than the previous book) which I'm personally not keen on, but others won't mind in the slightest.


Miracles: What They Are, Why They Happen, and How They Can Change Your Life
Miracles: What They Are, Why They Happen, and How They Can Change Your Life
Price: £6.99

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars and the amazing precision of it all, 28 Oct. 2014
*Disclaimer* I received an advance digital copy of this book in return for an honest review. This is an honest review, but you should know that I requested the chance to read it before publication.

Miracles is a book of two parts, both extremely readable, both exciting but in different ways.

Part 1 deals with what miracles are, and includes lots of fabulous science facts about the world, the universe, the moon, gravity, and the amazing precision of it all. I want to write all of these down so you can wonder at them all rig now, but I do not do spoilers (not after my enjoyment of a long anticipated book was ruined by an Amazon reviewer who started her eviewing with the spoiler to end all spoilers). The science in Miracles isn't controversial to non Christians who might pick up a copy, though the conclusions may be challenging! It'll be challenging to some Christians too. My inner science geek is a geek with faith, so the science stuff in part 1 was grand all round. There's also a good look at Bible miracles and why they happened. Loved, loved the exposition of the story of Lazarus as it gave me new pieces of the jigsaw I didn't know before. I'd buy Miracles for part 1 alone.

Part 2 covers actual modern day miracle stories, all the tellers of these stories are known to the author, deliberately so - he felt it would add a layer of credibility to some pretty incredible stories if he didn't just use hearsay but firsthand accounts from people he could trust. There are lots of them, grouped into different types. I tore through this second section in one afternoon whereas the first 8 chapters were consumed more slowly, with lots of asides to my husband, saying, "did you know..."

Overall reading this book was a very positive experience, and I think it has plenty for people of faith and people who don't believe but have an interest in the subject and an open mind to what they might read.


STAND BACK ATTEMPTING SCIENCE! COFFEE MUG - FUNNY MUG
STAND BACK ATTEMPTING SCIENCE! COFFEE MUG - FUNNY MUG

5.0 out of 5 stars Funny mug!, 14 Aug. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
My daughter gave this to her form teacher (a Physicist) as his leaving present and he was really pleased. So was she. Good product.


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